Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (GSEAS)

Website

www.nps.edu/Academics/GSEAS

Dean

Philip A. Durkee, Ph.D.

Naval Postgraduate School

Code 07, Spanagel Hall, Room 537

833 Dyer Road

Monterey, CA 93943-5117

(831) 656-2727, DSN 756-2727, FAX (831) 656-7861

durkee@nps.edu

Associate Dean

Christopher Smithtro, Col, USAF

Code 07B, Spanagel Hall, Room 537

833 Dyer Road

Monterey, CA 93943

(831) 656-3939, DSN 756-3939

cgsmitht@nps.edu

The Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences consist of seven Departments, Committee, and two Academic Groups:

 

Department of Applied Mathematics

 

MA

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

ECE

Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee

EAAC

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

MAE

Department of Meteorology

MR

Department of Oceanography

OC

Department of Physics

PH

Space Systems Academic Group

SP

Department of Systems Engineering

SE

Undersea Warfare Academic Group

USWAG

Overview

The Graduate School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (GSEAS) supports the Navy and the Department of Defense by educating future leaders to lead, innovate and manage in a changing, highly technological world, and by conducting research recognized internationally for its relevance to national defense and academic quality. More specifically, GSEAS provides advanced technical and scientific knowledge and understanding so graduates:

GSEAS accomplishes the above by offering high quality, traditional academic degrees that include:

Curricula

Traditional degree granting programs are offered by departments, normally at both the master's and Ph.D. levels. Most of these degree programs are an integral part of one or more unique interdisciplinary curricula designed for relevance to national security needs. Each of these curricula infuses cutting edge knowledge into academic courses taught by a dedicated, world-class faculty:

Anti-Submarine Warfare Certificate (274)

Applied Mathematics (380)

Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering (533)

Electronic Systems Engineering (590)

Electrical Systems Engineering (593)

Reactors/Mechanical Engineering via Distance Learning (571)

Mechanical & Naval Engineering (570)

Mechanical & Naval Engineering - Energy Focus (563)

Mechanical Engineering for Nuclear Trained Officers via Distance Learning (572)

Meteorology (372)

Meteorology and Oceanography (373)

Oceanography (440)

Operational Oceanography (374)

Space Systems Engineering (591)

Space Systems Operations (366) *

Space Systems Operations (Distance Learning) (316)*

Space Systems Operations (International) (364)

Systems Engineering (580)

Systems Engineering PhD (581)

Systems Engineering Analysis (308) *

Systems Engineering Certificate (282)

Systems Engineering (Distance Learning) (311)

Systems Engineering Management (MSSEM)/ Product Development (Distance Learning) (721)

Underwater Acoustic Systems (Distance Learning) (535)

Undersea Warfare (525) *

Undersea Warfare (International) (526) *

U.S. Naval Test Pilot School/Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering (613)

*Indicates an interdisciplinary curriculum offered with the Graduate School of Operational and Information Sciences

Degrees

Within each of these curricula, students have the opportunity to earn a high quality academic degree while focusing on an area relevant to national defense and war fighting capabilities. For example, students enrolled the in Space Systems Engineering (Curriculum 591) have an opportunity to study and do research related to space systems while earning an academic degree from either the Department of ECE, PH, MAE, ME or CS and while students enrolled in the Undersea Warfare (Curriculum 525/526) have the opportunity to study and do research related to undersea warfare while earning a degree from either the Departments of ECE, MA, MAE, PH, OC, or OR. Student research is under the tutelage of faculty with research experience related to national security and is an integral part of the educational experience of each student.

GSEAS offers the following degree programs, each designed and evolved to meet the changing needs of the Navy and defense communities while maintaining high academic standards:

Master of Science in Applied Mathematics, Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics

Master of Science in Applied Physics, Ph.D. in Applied Physics

Master of Science in Applied Science (Physical Oceanography), (Acoustics), (Operations Research) or (Signal Processing)

Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering, Astronautical Engineer, Ph.D. in Astronautical Engineering

Master of Science in Combat Systems Technology

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering, Electrical Engineer, Ph.D. in Electrical & Computer Engineering

Master of Science in Engineering Acoustics, Master of Engineering Acoustics, Ph.D. in Engineering Acoustics

Master of Science in Engineering Science

Master of Science in Engineering Systems

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Engineer, Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering

Master of Science in Meteorology, Ph.D. in Meteorology

Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

Master of Science in Physical Oceanography, Ph.D. in Physical Oceanography

Master of Science in Physics, Ph.D. in Physics

Master of Science in Product Development

Master of Science in Systems Engineering, Ph.D. in Systems Engineering

Master of Science in Systems Engineering Analysis

Master of Science in Systems Engineering Management

Department of Applied Mathematics

Chairman

Craig Rasmussen

Spanagel Room 238B

(831) 656-2763, DSN 756-2763

ras@nps.edu

Associate Chairman for Labs and Computing

David R. Canright

Spanagel Room 246

(831) 656-2782, DSN 756-2782

dcanright@nps.edu

Associate Chairman for Research

Pante Stanica

Spanagel Room 268

(831)656-2714, DSN 756-2714

pstanica@nps.edu

Carlos F. Borges, Professor (1991)*; Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1990.

David Canright, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Labs and Computing (1988); Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1987.

Lester E. Carr, III, Lecturer (2005); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Doyle Daughtry, Lecturer (2004); MA, East Carolina University, 1973.

Fariba Fahroo, Professor (1992); Ph.D., Brown University, 1991.

Christopher Frenzen, Professor (1989); Ph.D., University of Washington, 1982.

Ralucca Gera, Associate Professor (2005); Ph.D., Western Michigan University, 2005.

Frank Giraldo, Professor (2006); Ph.D., University of Virginia, 1995.

Wei Kang, Professor (1994); Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1991.

Jeremy Kozdon, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2009.

Arthur Krener, Distinguished Visiting Professor (2006); Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1971

Bard Mansager, Senior Lecturer, (1991); M.A., University of California, San Diego, 1979.

Beny Neta, Professor, (1985); Ph.D., Carnegie-Mellon University, 1977.

Guillermo Owen, Distinguished Professor (1983); Ph.D., Princeton University, 1962.

Craig Rasmussen, Professor and Chair (1991); Ph.D., University of Colorado at Denver, 1990.

Clyde Scandrett, Professor (1987); Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1985.

Gabriela Stanica, Lecturer (2012); MA SUNY Buffalo, 1999.

Pantelimon Stanica, Professor and Associate Chair for Research (2006); Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo, 1998.

Lucas Wilcox, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., Brown University, 2006.

Hong Zhou, Associate Professor (2004); Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1996.

Professors Emeriti:

Donald A. Danielson, Professor Emeritus (1985); Ph.D., Harvard University, 1968.

Richard Franke, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., University of Utah, 1970.

Harold M. Fredricksen, Professor Emeritus (1980); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1968.

William Gragg, Professor Emeritus (1987); Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 1964.

Toke Jayachandran, Professor Emeritus (1967); Ph.D., Case Institute of Technology, 1967.

Gordon E. Latta, Professor Emeritus (1979); Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1951.

Arthur L. Schoenstadt, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1968.

Maurice Dean Weir, Professor Emeritus (1969); D.A., Carnegie-Mellon University, 1970.

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Brief Overview

As well as the Master of Science and Ph.D. programs in Applied Mathematics, the Applied Mathematics Department offers individually tailored minor programs for many of the school's doctoral students. The majority of the department instructional—effort is devoted to the service courses offered.

Degrees

Master of Science in Applied Mathematics

In order to enter a program leading to the degree Master of Science in Applied Mathematics, the prospective student is strongly advised to possess either a Bachelor degree with a major in mathematics or a strong mathematical orientation in a Bachelor degree in another discipline.

Any program that leads to the degree Master of Science in Applied Mathematics for a student who has met the entrance criteria must contain:

  1. A minimum of 32 quarter-hours of graduate-level (3000-4000 numbered) courses with a minimum QPR of 3.0. The program specifications must be approved by the Chairman of the Department of Applied Mathematics and the Academic Associate. The program is subject to the general conditions specified in the Academic Council Policy Manual as well as the following:
  2. A student must complete or validate the four 1000 level calculus sequence and the introductory courses in linear algebra and discrete mathematics.
  3. The program must include at least 16 hours in 3000 level mathematics courses and 16 hours of approved 4000 level mathematics courses.
  4. Courses in Ordinary Differential Equations, Real Analysis, and upper division Discrete Mathematics are specifically required, and those at the 3000 level or above may be applied toward requirement (2).
  5. An acceptable thesis is required. The Department of Applied Mathematics permits any student pursuing a dual degree to write a single thesis meeting the requirements of both departments, subject to the approval of the Chairmen and Academic Associates of both departments.

In addition to the core courses required in item (3), the program allows the student to select an applied subspecialty option from the following list: applied mathematics, numerical analysis and computation, discrete mathematics, operations research, theoretical mathematics, and intelligence.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Applied Mathematics offers the Doctor of Philosophy in Applied Mathematics degree. Areas of specialization will be determined by the department on a case by case basis. Requirements for the degree include course work followed by an examination in both major and minor fields of study, and research culminating in an approved dissertation. It may be possible for the dissertation research to be conducted off-campus in the candidate's sponsoring organization.

Entrance into the program will ordinarily require a master's degree, although exceptionally well-prepared students with a bachelor's degree in mathematics may be admitted. A preliminary examination may be required to show evidence of acceptability as a doctoral student. Prospective students should contact the Chairman of the Applied Mathematics Department or the Academic Associate for further guidance.

Minor in Applied Mathematics

Ph.D. students from another department can qualify for a minor in mathematics by taking at least four mathematics courses at the 3000 or 4000 level; at least three of these must be at the 4000 level. The QPR for courses taken toward the minor requirement must be at least 3.5. The courses taken should constitute a coherent minor program, and must be approved by the Academic Associate for the Department of Applied Mathematics. The use of reading courses to satisfy the requirement is strongly discouraged.

Prerequisites

Prerequisites are as described in the course descriptions. If a student has not taken the prescribed prerequisites at NPS, then a validation examination by the Applied Mathematics Department may be substituted.

Applied Mathematics Course Descriptions

MA Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<MA Courses MAR125-MA2300>

MA0134 Problem Solving Session for MA1113/4 (No Credit) (0-3) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Offered for no credit, pass/fail. Students must be concurrently enrolled in either MA1113 or MA1114, but the course is not mandatory for either course. Prerequisites: None.

MA0156 Problem Solving Session for MA1115/6 (No Credit) (0-3) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Offered for no credit, pass/fail. Students must be concurrently enrolled in either MA1115 or MA1116, but the course is not mandatory for either course. Prerequisites: None.

MA0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course. Prerequisites: None.

MA1010 Algebra and Trigonometry (4-0) As Required

Real number system, complex numbers, exponents and radicals, algebraic expressions and operations, linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, functions and graphs, polynomials and their zeros, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of equations, matrices, trigonometry and unit circles, trigonometric identities and functions. Prerequisites: None.

MA1025 Introduction to Mathematical Reasoning (4-0) As Required

An introductory course in logic and elementary discrete mathematics to be taken by students in the Operations Research curriculum. Considerable emphasis is placed on propositional and predicate logic, and on techniques of proof in mathematics. Mathematical topics include sets, functions, and relations. Coverage of combinatorics includes an introduction to permutations, combinations, the pigeon-hole principle, and the principle of inclusion/exclusion. No previous experience with this material is assumed. Prerequisites: None.

MA1113 Single Variable Calculus (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Review of analytic geometry and trigonometry, functions of one variable, limits, derivatives, continuity and differentiability; differentiation of algebraic, trigonometric, logarithmic and exponential functions with applications to maxima and minima, rates, differentials; product rule, quotient rule, chain rule; antiderivatives, integrals and the fundamental theorem of calculus; definite integrals, areas. Taught at the rate of nine hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: Pre-Calculus mathematics.

MA1114 Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Topics in calculus include applications of integration, special techniques of integration, infinite series, convergence tests, and Taylor series. Matrix algebra topics covered are: the fundamental algebra of matrices including addition, multiplication of matrices, multiplication of a matrix by a constant and a column (vector) by a matrix; elementary matrices and inverses, together with the properties of these operations; solutions to mxn systems of linear algebraic equations using Gaussian elimination and the LU decomposition (without pivoting); determinants, properties of determinants; and a brief introduction to the arithmetic of complex numbers and DeMoivre's theorem. Taught at the rate of nine hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: MA1113.

MA1115 Multi-variable Calculus (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Vector algebra and calculus, directional derivative, gradient, polar coordinates and parametric equations, functions of several independent variables, limits, continuity, partial derivatives, chain rule, maxima and minima, double and triple integrals, cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Taught at the rate of nine hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: MA1114.

MA1116 Vector Calculus (3-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

The calculus of vector fields; directional derivative, gradient, divergence, curl; potential fields; Green's, Stokes', and the divergence integral theorems. Applications in engineering and physics. Taught at the rate of seven hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: MA1115.

MA1118 Multivariable Calculus for Operations Research (4-0) Fall/Spring

First-order linear differential equations, curves and surfaces, polar coordinates, vector algebra and calculus, functions of several independent variables, partial derivatives, Taylor series, chain rule, maxima and minima, directional derivatives and gradient, Lagrange multipliers, double integrals. Prerequisite: MA1114.

MA2025 Logic and Discrete Mathematics I (4-1) Summer/Winter

MA2025 is a first course in discrete mathematics for students of mathematics and computer science. Topics include propositional and predicate logic up to the deduction theorem, methods of mathematical proof, naive set theory, properties of functions, sequences and sums, mathematical induction, an introduction to divisibility and congruences, and an introduction to enumerative combinatorics. Prerequisites: None, although a review of algebra skills is recommended.

MA2043 Introduction to Matrix and Linear Algebra (4-0) As Required

The fundamental algebra of vectors and matrices including addition, scaling, and multiplication. Block operations with vectors and matrices. Algorithms for computing the LU (Gauss) factorization of an MxN matrix, with pivoting. Matrix representation of systems of linear equations and their solution via the LU factorization. Basic properties of determinants. Matrix inverses. Linear transformations and change of basis. The four fundamental subspaces and the fundamental theorem of linear algebra. Introduction to eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisites: Students should have mathematical background at the level generally expected of someone with a B.S. in Engineering, i.e., familiarity with Calculus and solid algebra skills. EC1010 (May be taken concurrently.)

MA2121 Differential Equations (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Ordinary differential equations: linear and nonlinear (first order) equations, homogeneous and non-homogeneous equations, linear independence of solutions, power series solutions, systems of differential equations, Laplace transforms. Applications include radioactive decay, elementary mechanics, mechanical and electrical oscillators, forced oscillations and resonance. Prerequisites: MA1114.

MA2300 Mathematics for Management (5-0) Winter/Spring/Summer

Mathematical basis for modern managerial tools and techniques. Elements of functions and algebra; differential calculus of single- and multi-variable functions; integration (antidifferentiation) of single-variable functions. Applications of the derivative to rates of change, curve sketching, and optimization, including the method of Lagrange multipliers. Prerequisite: College algebra.

<MA Courses MA3001-MA3730>

MA3001 Incremented Directed Study (Variable 1-0 or 2-0) (V-0) As Required

Provides the opportunity for a student who is enrolled in a 3000 level mathematics course to pursue the course material and its applications in greater depth by directed study to the extent of one additional hour beyond the normal course credit. Prerequisites: Enrollment in a 3000 level mathematics course and consent of instructor.

MA3025* Logic and Discrete Mathematics II (4-1) As Required

Provides a rigorous foundation in logic and elementary discrete mathematics to students of mathematics and computer science. Topics from logic include modeling English propositions, propositional calculus, quantification, and elementary predicate calculus. Additional mathematical topics include elements of set theory, mathematical induction, relations and functions, and elements of number theory. Prerequisites: MA2025 (preferable) or MA1025.

MA3030 Introduction to Combinatorics and Its Applications (4-1) As Required

Provides a thorough grounding in elementary combinatorics and its applications to computer science and discrete probability theory to students of computer science who concurrently take MA3025, Logic and Discrete Mathematics. Topics from combinatorics include fundamental counting rules, binomial and multinomial theorems, the pigeonhole and inclusion/exclusion principles, and homogeneous recurrence relations. Elementary discrete probability is covered, up to the expectation of a discrete random variable. Corequisite: MA3025.

MA3042 Linear Algebra (4-0) As Required

Finite-dimensional vector spaces, linear dependence, basis and dimension, change of basis. Linear transformations and similarity. Scalar product, inner product spaces. Orthogonal subspaces and least squares. LU (with pivoting), Cholesky, and QR factorizations. Eigenvalues/eigenvectors, diagonalization. Hermitian matrices, quadratic forms, definite matrices. Vector and matrix norms, orthogonal transformations, condition numbers. Prerequisite: MA1114.

MA3046 Matrix Analysis (4-1) As Required

This course provides students in the engineering and physical sciences curricula with an applications-oriented coverage of major topics of matrix and linear algebra. Matrix factorizations (LU, QR, Cholesky), the Singular Value Decomposition, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, the Schur form, subspace computations, structured matrices. Understanding of practical computational issues such as stability, conditioning, complexity, and the development of practical algorithms. Prerequisites: MA2043 and EC1010.

MA3110 Intermediate Analysis (4-0) Summer/Winter

Multi-variable calculus integrated with linear algebra. Functions of several variables, continuous transformations, Jacobians, chain rule, implicit function theorem, inverse function theorem, extreme, optimization and Lagrange multiplier technique. Applications in Operations Research. Prerequisites: MA1115 and MA3042.

MA3132 Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Solution of boundary value problems by separation of variables; Sturm-Liouville problems; Fourier and Bessel series solutions, Fourier transforms; classification of second-order equations; applications, method of characteristics. Applications to engineering and physical science. Satisfies the ESR in differential equations for the Applied Mathematics program. Prerequisites: MA2121 and MA1116.

MA3139 Fourier Analysis and Partial Differential Equations (4-0) Summer/Winter

Fourier series; solution of the one and two-dimensional wave equations, D'Alembert's solution, frequency and time domain interpretations; Fourier integral transforms and applications to ordinary and partial differential equations and linear systems; Convolution theorems. Course covers basic material essential for signal processing, filtering, transmission, waveguides, and other related problems. Applications include spectral analysis of electronic signals, e.g., radar or sonar. Designed for UW and EW/IW students. Prerequisites: MA1115 and MA2121.

MA3185 Tensor Analysis (3-0) Fall

Definition and algebra of tensors. Dyadic representation in Cartesian and general components. Calculus of tensor fields in curvilinear coordinates. Derivation and application of the basic equations of heat conduction, rigid body mechanics, elasticity, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism, Newtonian and Einsteinian orbital mechanics. Prerequisites: MA1116.

MA3232 Numerical Analysis (4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Provides the basic numerical tools for understanding more advanced numerical methods. Topics for the course include: Sources and Analysis of Computational Error, Solution of Nonlinear Equations, Interpolation and Other Techniques for Approximating Functions, Numerical Integration and Differentiation, Numerical Solution of Initial and Boundary Value Problems in Ordinary Differential Equations, and Influences of Hardware and Software. Prerequisites: MA1115, MA2121 and ability to program in MATLAB and MAPLE.

MA3243 Numerical Methods for Partial Differential Equations (4-1) Winter

Course designed to familiarize the student with analytical techniques as well as classical finite difference techniques in the numerical solution of partial differential equations. In addition to learning applicable algorithms, the student will be required to do programming. Topics covered include: Implicit, Explicit, and Semi-Implicit methods in the solution of Elliptic and Parabolic PDE's, iterative methods for solving Elliptic PDEs (SOR, Gauss-Seidel, Jacobi), the Lax-Wendroff and Explicit methods in the solution of 1st and 2nd order Hyperbolic PDEs. Prerequisites: MA3132 and the ability to program in a high level language such as Fortran, C, or MATLAB.

MA3261 Basic Parallel Computation (3-0) As Required

The course has two goals: First, to introduce fundamental issues such as shared vs. distributed memory, connection topologies, communication algorithms, speedup, efficiency, storage requirements, granularity, pipelining, problem scaling, and useful paradigms for algorithm development. Second, to develop working proficiency by designing, implementing, and evaluating the performance of several parallel algorithms. These include, but are not limited to, numerical quadrature, matrix computations, sorting, network analysis, and dynamic programming. Prerequisites: MA1115 or MA3025 and ability to program in a high-level language.

MA3301 Linear Programming (Same as OA3201) (4-0) As Required

See OA3201 for course description.

MA3393 Topics in Applied Mathematics (V-0) As Required

A selection of topics in applied mathematics. The course content varies and the credit varies. This course is intended to reflect study for the beginning graduate student in an area for which no formal course is taught. Credit for this course may be granted more than one time to an individual student. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MA3560* Applied Modern Algebra and Number Theory (4-0) As Required

This course is devoted to aspects of modern algebra and number theory that directly support applications, principally in communication. The algebraic emphasis is on ring and field theory, with special emphasis on the theory of finite fields, as well as those aspects of group theory that are important in the development of coding theory. Elements of number theory include congruences and factorization. Applications are drawn from topics of interest to DoN/DoD. These include error correcting codes and cryptography. Prerequisites: MA3025.

MA3607 Introduction to Real Analysis (4-0) Summer

The objective of this course is for students to achieve a solid understanding of the basic concepts, theorems, and proofs in introductory real analysis, including: limits, sequences, series, continuity, uniform convergence and uniform continuity, differentiation, and Riemann integration. This is a mathematics course in the pure sense. Proofs will be emphasized, and the student will learn how to reproduce, understand, create and enjoy mathematical proofs. Prerequisites: MA1114.

MA3610 Topology, Fractals, and Chaotic Dynamics (3-0) As Required

An introductory course on chaotic dynamics systems and fractals. Topics covered include: flows on the line, bifurcations, linear systems, phase plane, limit cycles, the Lorenz equations, fractals, and one-dimensional maps. Applications include population growth, laser threshold, the pendulum, relaxation oscillations, and synchronized chaos. Prerequisites: MA1115 and MA2121.

MA3677 Theory of Functions of a Complex Variable I (4-0) As Required

Selected topics from the theory of functions of a complex variable; analytic functions, power series, Laurent series. Singularities of analytic functions; contour integration and residues; applications of residues to real integrals and Laplace transforms, zeros of analytic functions, infinite product representation for analytic functions; maximum modulus theorems for analytic and harmonic functions; conformal mapping. Applications include interference effects in optics and problems from heat flow and fluid flow. Prerequisites: MA1115.

MA3730 Theory of Numerical Computation (3-0) As Required

Analysis of computational methods used for the solution of problems from the areas of algebraic equations, polynomial approximation, numerical differentiation and integration, and numerical solutions of ordinary differential equations. Prerequisites: MA2121.

<MA Courses MA4026-MA5810>

MA4026 Combinatorial Mathematics (4-0) As Required

Advanced techniques in enumerative combinatorics and an introduction to combinatorial structures. Topics include generating functions, recurrence relations, elements of Ramsey theory, theorems of Burnside and Polya, and balanced incomplete block designs. Application areas with DoD/DoN relevance range from mathematics to computer science and operations research, including applications in probability, game theory, network design, coding theory, and experimental design. Prerequisites: MA3025.

MA4027 Graph Theory and Applications (4-0) Fall

Advanced topics in the theory of graphs and digraphs. Topics include graph coloring, Eulerian and Hamiltonian graphs, perfect graphs, matching and covering, tournaments, and networks. Application areas with DoD/DoN relevance range from mathematics to computer science and operations research, including applications to coding theory, searching and sorting, resource allocation, and network design. Prerequisites: MA3025.

MA4103 Thesis Topics Seminar (3-0) As Required

Explores in depth discrete dynamical systems and the thesis topics of students enrolled in the Applied Mathematics degree program. Fulfills the ESR to provide students with the experience of organizing and presenting applied mathematical ideas to students and faculty, including a classroom environment. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only.

MA4237 Advanced Topics in Numerical Analysis (V-V) Fall

The subject matter will vary according to the abilities and interest of those enrolled. Applications of the subject matter to DoD/DoN are discussed. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MA4242 Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations (4-0) As Required

Adams formulas, Runge-Kutta formulas, extrapolation methods, implicit formulas for stiff equations; convergence and stability, error estimation and control, order and stepsize selection, applications. Prerequisites: MA3232.

MA4243 Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations (3-1) As Required

Finite difference methods for parabolic, elliptic, and hyperbolic equations, multi-grid methods; convergence and stability, error estimation and control, numerical solution of finite difference equations, applications. Prerequisites: MA3132, MA3232 suggested.

MA4245 Mathematical Foundations of Galerkin Methods (4-0) As Required

Variational formulation of boundary value problems, finite element and boundary element approximations, types of elements, stability, eigenvalue problems. Prerequisites: MA3132, MA3232 or equivalent.

MA4248 Computational Linear Algebra (4-1) As Required

Development of algorithms for matrix computations. Rounding errors and introduction to stability analysis. Stable algorithms for solving systems of linear equations, linear least squares problems and eigen problems. Iterative methods for linear systems. Structured problems from applications in various disciplines. Prerequisites: MA3046, or consent of instructor, advanced MATLAB programming.

MA4261 Distributed Scientific Computing (4-0) As Required

General principles of parallel computing, parallel techniques and algorithms, solution of systems of linear equations, eigenvalues and singular value decomposition, domain decomposition and application (e.g., satellite orbit determination and shallow water fluid flow). Prerequisites: MA3042 or MA3046, MA3132, and MA3232.

MA4301 Nonlinear Programming (Course Taught by or Staff, Same as OA4201) (4-0) As Required

See OA4201 for course description.

MA4302 Design of Experiments (Course Taught by or Staff, Same as OA4101) (3-1) As Required

See OA4101 for course description.

MA4303 Regression Analysis (Course Taught by or Staff, Same as OA4102) (4-0) As Required

See OA4102 for course description.

MA4304 Time Series Analysis (Course Taught by or Staff, Same as OA4308) (4-0) As Required

See OA4308 for course description.

MA4305 Stochastic Models II (Course Taught by or Staff, Same as OA4301) (4-0) As Required

See OA4301 for course description.

MA4311 Calculus of Variations (4-0) As Required

First and second order tests, Lagrange multipliers, Euler-Lagrange equation, nonsmooth solutions, optimization with constraints, Weierstrass condition, optimal control of ODE systems, Pontryagin maximum principle. Applications may include: control and dynamical systems, estimation, weak formulations, Hamilton's variational principle, or others depending on the interests of the students. Prerequisites: MA2121.

MA4321 Stability, Bifurcation and Chaos (3-0) As Required

Differential equations and dynamical systems, equilibrium of autonomous systems, stability, Liapunov's method, examples of chaos, local bifurcations of vector fields and maps, chaotic dynamical systems. Prerequisites: MA3610.

MA4322 Principles and Techniques of Applied Mathematics I (4-0) Fall

Selected topics from applied mathematics to include: Dimensional Analysis, Scaling, Stability and Bifurcation, Perturbation Methods— regular and singular with boundary layer analysis, as well as, asymptotic expansions of integral, integrals equations, Green's functions of boundary value problems, and distribution theory. Prerequisites: MA3042 and MA3132; MA3232 strongly recommended.

MA4323 Principles and Techniques of Applied Mathematics II (4-0) Winter

Continuation of MA4322. Selected topics include: calculus of variations, Hamiltonian Mechanics, distribution theory and Green's Functions in two and three dimensions, and discrete models. Prerequisites: MA4322

MA4332 Partial Differential Equations (4-0) As Required

This course provides an introduction to the theory of partial differential equations. It includes the following topics: classification of second order equations; initial value and boundary value problems for hyperbolic, parabolic, and elliptic partial differential equations; existence and uniqueness of linear elliptic and parabolic PDEs; nonlinearparabolic and elliptic PDEs; Hamilton-Jacobi equations; systems of conservation laws and nonlinear wave equations; transform methods and Green's functions. Prerequisites: MA3132, and MA3232 strongly recommended.

MA4335 Linear and Nonlinear Waves (3-0) As Required

Analysis of the two main classes of wave motion, hyperbolic waves and linear dispersive waves. Topics covered include: kinematic waves, shock waves, shock structure and shock fitting, Burger's equation, the wave equation, linear dispersive waves, wave patterns and water waves. Prerequisite: MA3132.

MA4362 Astrodynamics (3-0) As Required

Review of the two-body problem. The effects of a third point mass and a distributed mass. Expansion of the disturbing potential in series of Legendre functions. Variation of parameter equations for osculating orbital elements. Perturbation and numerical solution techniques. Statistical orbit determination. Codes used by the military to maintain the catalog of artificial satellites and space debris. Prerequisites: SS3500 or equivalent.

MA4372 Integral Transforms (3-0) As Required

The Laplace, Fourier and Hankel transforms and their inversions; Asymptotic behavior. Applications to problems in engineering and physics. Prerequisites: MA3132.

MA4377 Asymptotic and Perturbation Methods I (4-0) As Required

Advanced course in the application of approximate methods to the study of integrals and differential equations arising in physical problems. Topics covered include: asymptotic sequences and expansions, integrals of a real variable, contour integrals, limit process expansions applied to ordinary differential equations, multiple variable expansion procedures and applications to partial differential equations. Prerequisites: MA3132.

MA4378 Asymptotic and Perturbation Methods II (3-0) As Required

Continuation of MA4377. Prerequisites: MA4377.

MA4391 Analytical Methods for Fluid Dynamics (4-0) As Required

The basic fluid dynamic equations will be derived, and a variety of analytical methods will be applied to problems in viscous flow, potential flow, boundary layers, and turbulence. Applications in aeronautics will be discussed. Prerequisites: MA3132 or MA3139.

MA4392 Numerical Methods for Fluid Dynamics (4-0) As Required

Numerical methods exclusively will be applied to fluid dynamics problems in viscous flow, potential flow, boundary layers, and turbulence. Applications in aeronautics will be discussed. Prerequisites: MA3232 and MA4391.

MA4393 Topics in Applied Mathematics (V-0) Fall

The course content varies but applications of interest to the DoN/DoD will be discussed. Credit may be granted for taking this course more than once. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MA4400 Cooperation and Competition (4-0) Spring

The course will develop game theoretic concepts in evaluations of the importance of players in bargaining situations and of elements in networks. Topics covered include cooperative and noncooperative games, bargaining, the Shapley Value, and coalitions. The course will study applications to military problems and applications to economics, political science, and biology. There will be extensive reading from the literature. Prerequisites: MA3042, OA3201, and an introductory course in probability.

MA4404 Structure and Analysis of Complex Networks (4-0) Winter

The course focuses on the emerging science of complex networks and their applications, through an introduction to techniques and models for understanding and predicting their behavior. The topics discussed will be building mainly on graph theory concepts, and they will address the mathematics of networks, their applications to computer networks and social networks, and their use in research. The students will learn the fundamentals of dynamically evolving complex networks, study current research in the field, and apply their knowledge in the analysis of real network systems through a final project. DoD applications include security of critical communication infrastructure. Prerequisite: MA4027.

MA4550 Combinatorial and Cryptographic Properties of Boolean Functions (4-0) As Required

The course will discuss the Fourier analysis of Boolean functions and the relevant combinatorics with an eye toward cryptography and coding theory. Particular topics will include avalanche features of Boolean functions, correlation immunity and resiliency, bentness, trade-offs among cryptographic criteria and real-life applications in the designs of stream and block ciphers. Prerequisite: MA3025 or a similar combinatorial/discrete mathematics course (and recommended, but not required, an introductory course in probability).

MA4560* Coding and Information Theory (4-0) Summer

Mathematical analysis of the codes used over communication channels is made. Techniques developed for efficient, reliable and secure communication are stressed. Effects of noise on information transmission are analyzed and techniques to combat their effects are developed. Linear codes, finite fields, single and multiple error-correcting codes are discussed. Codes have numerous applications for communication in the military, and these will be addressed. Prerequisites: MA3560.

MA4565 Advanced Modern Algebra (3-0) As Required

A continuation of MA3560. Rings, ring homomorphism, integral domains and Euclidean domains. Unique factorization rings, polynomial rings. Modules and ideals. Noetherian rings, Field extension and Galois theory. Prerequisites: MA3560.

MA4570 Cryptography (4-0) Spring

The methods of secret communication are addressed. Simple cryptosystems are described and classical techniques of substitution and transposition are considered. The public-key cryptosystems, RSA, Discrete Logarithm and other schemes are introduced. Applications of cryptography and cryptanalysis. Prerequisites: MA3560.

MA4593 Topics in Algebra (3-0) Fall

A selection of topics in algebra. Content of the course varies. Credit for taking the course more than once is allowed. Students may select a topic of interest to the DoN/DoD, so the course can support the MERs in a variety of curricula. Prerequisite: MA3560.

MA4620 Theory of Dynamical Systems (4-0) As Required

This course provides an introduction to the theory of dynamical systems providing a basis for the analysis and design of systems in engineering and applied science. It includes the following topics: Second order linear systems; contraction mapping, existence and uniqueness of solutions; continuous dependence on initial conditions; comparison principle; Lyapunov stability theorems; LaSalle's theorem; linearization methods; nonautonomous systems; converse theorems; center manifold theorems; and stationary bifurcations of nonlinear systems. Prerequisites: MA2121.

MA4635 Functions of Real Variables I (3-0) As Required

Semi-continuous functions, absolutely continuous functions, functions of bounded variation; classical Lebesgue measure and integration theory, convergence theorems and Lp spaces. Abstract measure and integration theory, signed measures, Radon-Nikodym theorem; Lebesgue decomposition and product measure; Daniell integrals and integral representation of linear functionals. Prerequisites: MA3606.

MA4636 Functions of Real Variables II (3-0) As Required

Continuation of MA4635. Prerequisites: MA4635.

MA4675 Complex Analysis (4-0) As Required

A continuation of MA3677. Differential equations in the complex plane, transform methods, the Wiener-Hopf method, integral equations, discrete Fourier analysis. Prerequisite: MA3677.

MA4693 Topics in Analysis (3-0) Spring

Content of the course varies. Students will be allowed credit for taking the course more than once. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MA5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

MO Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<MO Courses MO1180-MO1903>

MO designated courses are intended for students in operational curricula only. They do not satisfy the mathematics course requirements for accredited engineering curricula, nor do they satisfy the prerequisites for any of the MA designated courses.

MO1180 Topics in Mathematics for Systems Analysis (3-2) Spring/Fall

A one quarter course in logic, elementary mathematics, combinatorics, and matrix algebra, plus a review of selected topics from single variable calculus with extensions to two variables. This course is intended for first-quarter students in the distance learning Master of Systems Analysis curriculum. Logic places emphasis on the Propositional and Predicate Calculus. Elementary mathematical topics include sets, functions, and relations. Coverage of combinatorics includes an introduction to basic principles of counting (sum and product rules), permutations, and combinations. The fundamental algebra of matrices includes addition, multiplication of matrices, and multiplication of a matrix by a constant, and a column (vector) by a matrix; elementary matrices and inverses, together with the properties of these operations; solutions to m x n systems of linear algebraic equations using Gaussian elimination. Selected topics from single-variable calculus are extended to functions of two-variables, including double integrals over rectangles and general regions. (This course may not be taken for credit by students in an engineering or science degree program, nor may it be used as a prerequisite for any other mathematics course). Prerequisite: Single-variable calculus.

MO1901 Mathematics for ISSO (4-0) As Required

A brief survey of selected calculus and post-calculus topics--single variable derivatives and integrals, infinite series and sequences, complex numbers, and Fourier series and transforms. (This course may not be taken for credit by students in an engineering or science degree program, nor may it be used as a prerequisite for any other mathematics course.) Prerequisites: None.

MO1903 Mathematics for ISSO Space Systems Operations Specialization (3-0) Fall

To be taken concurrently with MA1114. The course consists of a brief survey of the following topics: Complex numbers, Fourier series and transforms, and Ordinary Linear Differential Equations. (This course may not be taken for credit by students in an engineering or science degree program, nor may it be used as a prerequisite for any other mathematics course.) Taught at the rate of seven hours per week for five weeks. Prerequisites: MA1113.

*Required courses for the certificate program Mathematics of Secure Communication.

Network Science Certificate - Curriculum 200

Program Manager

Ralucca Gera, Ph.D.

Code MA, Spanagel Hall, Room 260

(831) 656-2230, DSN 756-2230

Fax: (831) 656-2355

rgera@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Academic Certificate in Network Science provides education in the use of mathematical methods for the analysis, understanding, and exploitation of complex networks. Network Science has emerged as an area critical to the success of the mission of the Navy and the Department of Defense because of the central role it plays in cybersecurity, network-centric warfare, and other related areas of critical interest. A thorough understanding of the underlying mathematics is essential for the correct interpretation and further development of practical methods, models, and approaches to problems involving complex networks. The certificate program is designed to provide that very background. Upon successful completion of the coursework, students will be awarded an academic certificate in keeping with standard practices of the Naval Postgraduate School.

Requirements for Entry

Prospective students must have taken or validated one of MA3025 (suggested), MA2025, MA1025, or equivalent (a working knowledge of mathematical logic, proof techniques and elementary discrete mathematics).

Entry Date

Program entry dates are flexible and students who wish to pursue this certificate should coordinate with the program manager.

Program Length

Variable, usually 1 year.

MA Academic Certificate Requirements

To earn the academic certificate students must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these

standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Required Courses

MA4027

(4-0)

Graph Theory and Applications

MA4404

(4-0)

Structure and Analysis of Complex Networks

and one of the following:

MA4400

(4-0)

Cooperation and Competition

CS4558

(3-2)

Network Traffic Analysis

OA4202

(4-0)

Network Flows and Graphs

Mathematics of Secure Communication Certificate - Curriculum 280

Program Manager

Pante Stanica

Spanagel Hall, Room 268

(831) 656-2714, DSN 756-2714, FAX (831) 656-2355

pstanica@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Mathematics of Secure Communication certificate program comprises three courses. Upon successful completion of the coursework, students will be awarded a certificate of accomplishment in keeping with standard practices of the Naval Postgraduate School. The purpose for its development is to provide Mathematics education to Naval officers and DoD civilians in the broad area of Cryptography and secure communications. As such it satisfies a “Knowledge, Skills, Abilities” (KSA) requirement in the Applied Technology field of “Fundamentals of cryptology and cryptanalysis” for Professional Military Education.

Requirements for Entry

Prerequisite Courses: One of MA3025 (suggested), MA2025, MA1025, or equivalent (a working knowledge of mathematical logic, proof techniques and elementary discrete mathematics). Also required is a baccalaureate degree with an academic profile code (APC) of 324.

Entry Dates

At the beginning of the spring and fall quarters, with start dates in late March/ early April and late September/ early October, respectively.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

To earn the academic certificate students must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Required Courses

Quarter 1

MA3560

(4-0)

Applied Modern Algebra and Number Theory

Quarter 2

MA4560

(4-0)

Coding and Information Theory

Quarter 3

MA4570

(4-0)

Cryptography

Certificate in Scientific Computation - Curriculum 283

Program Manager

Beny Neta

Spanagel Hall, Room 270

(831) 656-2235, DSN 756-2235

FAX (831) 656-2355

bneta@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Scientific Computation academic certificate provides education in the use of mathematical analysis and numerical solution techniques to model science and engineering problems on computers. Scientific Computation has become the third pillar of scientific research, a peer with traditional methods of physical experimentation and theoretical investigation, and as such has emerged as an area critical to the success of the mission of the Navy and the Department of Defense. High performance computers are already widely used in weather prediction, modeling ocean dynamics, design and testing of advanced weapons systems, development of new smart materials, etc. And it has become very clear that even more broad application of scientific computation will be essential to accelerate scientific discovery for national competitiveness and global security.

A thorough understanding of the mathematics underlying the algorithms is essential for the correct interpretation and further development of computational approaches in science. The Scientific Computation certificate program is designed to provide that very background. It is comprised of four courses – the first two of these are fundamental and the other two are selected from a group of nine courses that allows the certificate to be tailored to a specific area of interest. Upon successful completion of the coursework, students will be awarded a certificate of accomplishment in keeping with standard practices of the Naval Postgraduate School.

Requirements for Entry

Prospective students must meet the necessary prerequisites for the courses in the program.

Entry Date

Program entry dates are flexible and students who wish to pursue this certificate should coordinate with the program manager.

Program Length

Variable.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

To earn the academic certificate students must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Required Courses

MA3046

Matrix Analysis

MA3232

Numerical Analysis

And any two from

MA4237

Advanced Topics in Numerical Analysis

MA4242

Numerical Solution of Ordinary Differential Equations

MA4243

Numerical Solution of Partial Differential Equations

MA4245

Mathematical Foundations of Galerkin Methods

MA4248

Computational Linear Algebra

MA4261

Distributed Scientific Computing

MA4311

Calculus of Variations

MA4377

Asymptotic and Perturbation Methods

MA4620

Theory of Dynamical Systems

Applied Mathematics - Curriculum 380

Program Officer

LCDR Thor Martinsen

Code EC/MA, Spanagel Hall, Room 401A

(831)656-2678, DSN 756-2859

Fax (831)656-2760 (ECE) and (831)656-2355 (MA)

tmartins@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Don Danielson

Code MA, Spanagel Hall, Room 238B

(831) 656-2622, DSN 756-2622, FAX (831) 656-2355

dad@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This program is designed to meet the needs of the Department of Defense for graduates who are skilled in applying concepts of higher mathematics. The objective of the program is to equip an officer with the skill to analyze a military problem, formulate it in mathematical terms, solve or approximate a solution, and interpret and present the results.

Completion of this curriculum also qualifies an officer as an Applied Mathematics Subspecialty with a code of 4100P. A typical job in this subspecialty is an instructor in mathematics at the U.S. Naval Academy or the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

Requirements for Entry

Preparatory to graduate work in applied mathematics, the officer shall have completed a strong program of study at the undergraduate level or the first three quarters of the mathematics core sequence, which includes linear algebra, advanced calculus in one and several variables, ordinary differential equations, probability and statistics. Officers not having the required qualifications for direct input enter the program indirectly through the Engineering Science (460) curriculum. An APC of 324 is required.

Entry Date

Advanced Science (Applied Mathematics) is an eight-quarter course of study with preferred entry date in June. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus II w/ Matrix Algebra

MA2025

(4-0)

Logic & Discrete Mathematics I

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy

Quarter 2

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Calculus

MA3025

(4-1)

Logic & Discrete Mathematics II

MA3042

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

Quarter 3

MA3046

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

MA3110

(4-0)

Intermediate Analysis

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

MA3560

(3-0)

Modern Appl Algebra $ Num Theory

Quarter 4

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Ops I

MA3301

(4-0)

Linear Programming

MA3132

(4-0)

PDEs

OA3101

(4-1)

Probability

Quarter 5

NW3276

(2-2)

Joint Maritime Ops II

MA3607

(4-0)

Real Analysis

MA3232

(4-0)

Num Analysis

OA3102

(4-1)

Statistics

Quarter 6

MA4322

(4-0)

Principles and Techniques of Applied Mathematics I

MA3677

(4-0)

Complex Analysis

MA3xxx

(3-0)

Elective

OA3103

(4-1)

Data Analysis

Quarter 7

MA4323

(4-0)

Principles and Techniques of Applied Mathematics II

MA0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

MA4xxx

(3-0)

Elective

MA4xxx

(4-0)

Elective

Quarter 8

MA0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

MA0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

MA4xxx

(3-0)

Elective

NW3285

(4-0)

National Security Decision

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Applied Mathematics - Curriculum 380

The value of graduate education in mathematics lies in the vast breadth of its applicability. The officer with advanced education in mathematics possesses skills in problem solving, modeling, abstraction, optimization, and analysis that are sufficiently general that they apply in many arenas and never lose their currency in the face of changing technology and yet-to-be-identified needs. Graduate education in mathematics is a career-long enabler. Students in the Applied Mathematics curriculum will receive a solid mathematical foundation as they transition into graduate curricula emphasizing relevant and modern advanced mathematical techniques. Students will be encouraged to develop and utilize skills in analysis, reasoning, creativity, and exposition as they acquire knowledge of mathematics and its applications.

1. Fundamental Areas: The officer will complete courses in the following fundamental areas of Mathematics, developing sufficient mastery to qualify for teaching Mathematics at the undergraduate level.

  1. Single, Multivariate, and Vector Calculus
  2. Linear Algebra and Algebraic Structures
  3. Logic and Discrete Mathematics
  4. Real and Complex Analysis
  5. Modern Applied Algebra and Number Theory
  6. Numerical Analysis
  7. Mathematical Modeling in Applied Mathematics
  8. Ordinary and Partial Differential Equations

2. Applications: The officer will become well-versed in the applications of mathematics to real world problems of interest to the military, enhancing performance in post-graduate operational billets and policy making positions.

3. Computer Skills: The officer will acquire the ability to use higher-level structured computer languages on current workstations

4. Communication and Research Skills: The officer will perform independent research in an area of Mathematics, develop written and oral presentation skills, and gain instructional experience.

5. Joint Professional Military Education: Graduates will complete the Navy Joint Professional Military Education Phase I requirements.

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Chairman

Clark Robertson, Ph.D.

Code EC, Spanagel Hall, Room 437A

(831) 656-2081, DSN 756-2081, FAX (831) 656-2760

crobertson@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Instruction

Frank Kragh, Ph.D.

Code EC/Kh, Spanagel Hall, Room 448B

(831) 656-7502, DSN 756-7502

fekragh@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Student Programs

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Phil Pace, Ph.D.

Code EC/Pc, Spanagel Hall, Room 543B

(831) 656-2645, DSN 756-2645

pepace@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Operations

Michael Hsu, CDR, USN

Code EC/Hs, Spanagel Hall, Room 422

dsneely@nps.edu

Ronald G. Aikins, Research Associate (2006), BSCS, Western Kentucky University, 1979

Robert W. Ashton, Associate Professor (1992); Ph.D., Worcester Polytechnic Institute, 1991.

Nathan Brown, Research Associate (2012); M.S., Case Western Reserve University, 2010.

Jon T. Butler, Distinguished Professor (1987); Ph.D., Ohio State University, 1973.

Roberto Cristi, Professor (1985); Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1983.

Monique P. Fargues, Professor and Associate Chair for Student Programs (1989); Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1988.

Douglas J. Fouts, Professor (1990); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 1990.

David Garren, Associate Professor (2012); Ph.D., College of William and Mary, 1991.

Deborah Goshorn, Research Assistant Professor (2008); Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 2010.

Rachel Goshorn, Assistant Professor (2006); Ph.D. University of California at San Diego, 2005.

Tri T. Ha, Professor (1987); Ph.D., University of Maryland, 1977.

Phil Hopfner, Research Associate (2005); B.S., University of Washington, 1984

Robert (Gary) Hutchins, Associate Professor (1993); Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 1988.

David C. Jenn, Professor (1990); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1989.

Alex Julian, Assistant Professor (2004); Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison, 1997.

Jeffrey B. Knorr, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., Cornell University, 1970.

Frank Kragh, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Instruction (2003); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Herschel H. Loomis, Jr., Distinguished Professor (1981); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1963.

John McEachen, Professor (1996); Ph.D., Yale University, 1995.

James Bret Michael, Professor (2004); Ph.D. George Mason University, 1993.

Sherif Michael, Professor (1983); Ph.D., University of West Virginia, 1983.

Donna Miller, Research Associate (2007); MSSE (Software Engineering), Naval Postgraduate School, 2000.

Michael A. Morgan, Distinguished Professor (1979); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1976.

Giovanna Oriti, Associate Professor (2008); Ph.D. University of Catania, Italy, 1997.

Phillip E. Pace, Professor and Associate Chair for Researcher (1992); Ph.D., University of Cincinnati, 1990.

Andrew Parker, Research Associate (1996); M.S., University of Maryland, 1994; MSES, Naval Postgraduate School, 1992.

Matthew Porter, Research Associate (2012); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2011.

John P. Powers, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara, 1970.

R. Clark Robertson, Professor and Chair (1989); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1983.

Ric Romero, Assistant Professor (2010); Ph.D. University of Arizona, 2010.

Alan Ross, Professor of the Practice of Computer Engineering (2008); Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1978.

Deborah Shifflett, Research Associate (2001); MPA, Golden Gate University, 1996.

Weilian Su, Associate Professor (2004); Ph.D., Georgia Institute of Technology, 2004.

Frederick Terman, Senior Lecturer (1983); MSEE, Stanford University, 1964.

Charles W. Therrien, Professor Emeritus (1984); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1969.

Preetha Thulasiraman, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D. University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, 2010.

Murali Tummala, Professor (1986); Ph.D., India Institute of Technology, 1984.

Todd Weatherford, Associate Professor (1995); Ph.D., North Carolina State University, 1993.

Xiaoping Yun, Distinguished Professor (1994); Sc.D., Washington University, 1987.

Lawrence J. Ziomek, Professor (1982); Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1981.

Dan Zulaica, Research Associate (2010); B.S., University of Texas at Arlington, 1981.

*The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Brief Overview

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering is the major contributor to programs for the education of officers in the Electronic Systems Engineering curriculum, the Combat Systems curriculum, the Space Systems Engineering curriculum, the Electronic Warfare curriculum and the Information Warfare curriculum. Additionally, the department offers courses in support of other curricula such as Information Technology Management; Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I); Space Systems Operations; Underwater Acoustics and Engineering Acoustics.

If needed, an MSEE student will usually spend six to twelve months learning or reviewing material at a junior or senior level before entering into graduate studies. The graduate study portion of a typical program is about one year in duration with a combination of course study and thesis work being performed. The thesis portion of the program is the equivalent of four courses (one quarter) with an acceptable written thesis being a requirement for graduation.

The curriculum is organized to provide the students with coursework spanning the breadth of Electrical and Computer Engineering. In addition, students concentrate in one major area of specialization within Electrical and Computer Engineering by taking a planned sequence of advanced courses. Currently there are formal concentrations in:

Communications Systems

Computer Systems

Cyber Systems

Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems

Power Systems and Microelectronics

Signal Processing Systems

Network Engineering

Sensor Systems Engineering

The department has about forty faculty members, including tenure track, non-tenure track, and military faculty, contributing to the instructional and research programs.

Mission

The ECE department mission is to provide NPS students with the highest quality and most defense-relevant graduate education available in electrical and computer engineering.

Degrees

The ECE department offers programs leading to the Master of Science degree in Electrical Engineering (MSEE), Master of Science in Computer Engineering (MSCE), the Master of Science in Engineering Science with a major in Electrical Engineering [MSES(EE)] or the Master of Science in Engineering Science with a major in Computer Engineering [MSES(CE)], the Master of Engineering with major in Electrical Engineering[MEng(EE)] or the Master of Engineering with a major in Computer Engineering [MEng(CE)], the degree of Electrical Engineer (EE) and Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.). A student is able to earn one of the academic degrees listed above while enrolled in Electronic Systems Engineering (Curriculum 590 resident or 592 non-resident distance learning), Space Systems Engineering (Curriculum 591), Combat Systems Science & Engineering (Curriculum 533), and Undersea Warfare (Curriculum 525). The department typically graduates over forty graduate degree candidates per year in resident programs and additional candidates in distant learning programs.

MSEE Degree Program

The MSEE Degree Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission (EAC) of ABET, http://www.abet.org. A Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering or its equivalent is required for the MSEE degree. Credits earned at the Naval Postgraduate School and credits from the validation of appropriate courses at other institutions are combined to achieve the degree equivalence.

This program provides depth and diversity through specially arranged course sequences to meet the needs of the Navy and the interests of the individual. The department chairman's approval is required for all programs leading to this degree.

Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 52 credit hours of graduate level work.
  2. There must be a minimum of 36 credits in the course sequence 3000-4999, of which at least 30 credits must be in Electrical and Computer Engineering. The remainder of these 36 credits must be in engineering, mathematics, physical science, and/or computer science.
  3. Specific courses may be required by the department and at least four courses that total a minimum of 12 credits, must be in the course sequence 4000-4999.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits must be presented to, and approved by, the department.

MSEE Program Educational Objectives: The MSEE Degree program has the following objectives (i.e., skills and abilities that graduates are expected to attain 3-5 more years after graduation):

MSEE Student Outcomes: In order to achieve the above objectives, the Program curriculum is designed to produce the following outcomes (skills and abilities students will have at the time they complete the Program):

MSCE Degree Program

The MSCE program provides both a broad-based education in traditional computer hardware and software related subjects while at the same time concentrating on military-relevant Computer Engineering topics such as Computer Security, High-Speed Networking, Distributed and Parallel computing, and Fault Tolerant computing. A Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering or its equivalent is required for the MSCE degree.

Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 52 credit hours of graduate-level work.
  2. There must be a minimum of 36 credits in the course sequence 3000-4999, of which at least 24 credits must be in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, or Software Engineering.
  3. Specific courses are required by the department, and at least four courses that total a minimum of 12 credits must be in the course sequence 4000-4999.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits must be presented to, and approved by, the department.

MSES(CE) Degree Program

Students who do not have BSCE degrees and are unable to achieve BSCE equivalency can pursue the MSES (CE) degree. Such students must, by virtue of their education and on-the-job experience, be capable of successfully completing the Computer Engineering Program Core and Specialization Tracks. Except for BSCE degree equivalency, the requirements for the MSES (CE) degree are the same as those for the MSCE degree.

Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 52 credit hours of graduate-level work.
  2. There must be a minimum of 36 credits in the course sequence 3000-4999, of which at least 24 credits must be in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, or Software Engineering.
  3. Specific courses are required by the department, and at least four courses that total a minimum of 12 credits must be in the course sequence 4000-4999.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits must be presented to, and approved by, the department.

MSES(EE) Degree Program

Students who do not have BSEE degrees and are unable to achieve BSEE equivalency can pursue the MSES(EE) degree. Such students must by virtue of their education and on-the-job experience be capable of successfully completing one of the MSEE Degree Program specialization tracks. Except for BSEE degree equivalency, the requirements for the MSES(EE) degree are the same as those for the MSEE degree.

Requirements:

  1. A student needs a minimum of 52 credit hours of graduate-level work.
  2. There must be a minimum of 36 credits in the course sequence 3000-4999, of which at least 30 credits must be in Electrical and Computer Engineering. The remainder of these 36 credits must be in engineering, mathematics, physical science, and/or computer science.
  3. Specific courses may be required by the department and at least four courses that total a minimum of 12 credits, must be in the course sequence 4000-4999.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits must be presented to, and approved by, the department.

MEng(EE) Program

The Master of Engineering (Electrical Engineering) is a course-based degree program for non-resident students enrolled in distance learning programs.

Requirements:

  1. Students must complete a minimum of 32 credit hours of graduate level course work which includes a minimum of three courses and 10 credit hours of 4000 level course work.
  2. MEng (EE) degree programs must contain a minimum of 5 courses in electrical and computer engineering.
  3. This degree program is quite flexible and can be designed with a focus tailored to meet distance learning customer requirements for work-force development.

MEng(CE) Program

The Master of Engineering (Computer Engineering) is a course-based degree program for non-resident students enrolled in distance learning programs. Specific courses are required by the department.

Requirements:

  1. Students must complete a minimum of 36 credit hours of graduate level course work which includes a minimum of four courses and 12 credit hours of 4000 level course work where at least three of the four 4000-level courses must be graded.
  2. MEng (CE) degree programs must contain a minimum of eight courses in Electrical and Computer Engineering, Computer Science, or Software Engineering.
  3. This degree program is quite flexible and can be designed with a focus tailored to meet distance learning customer requirements for work-force development.

EE Degree Program

Students with strong academic backgrounds may enter a program leading to the degree of Electrical Engineer. The EE degree program requires more course work and a more comprehensive thesis than a master's degree program but does not require the seminal research demanded in a Ph.D. program.

Requirements:

  1. A minimum of 96 total graduate credits is required for the award of the engineer's degree, of which at least 24 must be in accepted thesis research, and at least 54 credits must be in Electrical and Computer Engineering courses.
  2. At least 36 of the total hours are to be in courses in the sequence 4000-4999. Approval of all programs must be obtained from the Chairman, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

TSSE Program

The Total Ship Systems Engineering Program is an interdisciplinary, systems engineering and design-oriented program available to students enrolled in Mechanical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering or Combat Systems programs. The program objective is to provide a broad-based, design-oriented education focusing on the warship as a total engineering system. The eight-course sequence of electives introduces the student to the integration procedures and tools used to develop highly complex systems such as Navy ships. The program culminates in a team-performed design of a Navy ship, with students from all three curricula as team members. Students enrolled in programs leading to the Electrical Engineer Degree are also eligible for participation. Entry requirements are a baccalaureate degree in an engineering discipline with a demonstrated capability to perform satisfactorily at the graduate level. The appropriate degree thesis requirements must be met, but theses that address system design issues are welcome.

Ph.D. Degree Program

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering has an active program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree. Joint programs with other departments are possible. A noteworthy feature of these programs is that the student's research may be conducted away from the Naval Postgraduate School in a cooperating laboratory or other installation of the federal government. The degree requirements are as outlined under the general school requirements for the doctor's degree.

ECE Department Laboratories

The laboratories of the department serve the dual role of supporting the instructional and research activities of the department. The department has well-developed laboratories in each specialty area.

Nano-electronics Lab

This laboratory supports design and analysis of semiconductor devices, design and development of VLSI integrated circuits, and design, implementation and testing of microprocessor and VLSI systems. Major equipment of the lab includes: Semiconductor Parameterization Equipment, Capacitance-Voltage measurement equipment, Semi-automatic Probing stations, High Speed Sampling Scopes, Logic Analyzers, Printed Circuit Assembly tools, Unix and PC workstations, Silvaco(TM) TCAD simulation tools, Tanner and Cadence Design tools and Semiconductor Parameterization Equipment (high power capability), Manual Probing stations (2+), Wire-bonding equipment, and PC workstations. The lab supports courses and thesis research projects in the MSEE degree Computer/Nanotechnology track and Power/Solid state track. This lab will be a major player in the nanoelectronics of the NPS Nano/MEMs initiative.

Digital Electronics/Microprocessor Lab

This laboratory is an instructional lab that supports courses in digital logic design and microprocessor-based system design. Students acquire practical knowledge through hard-wired and programmable logic design. Programmable design includes CPLDs (complex programmable logic devices) and FPGAs (field-programmable gate arrays). Students learn how to develop combinational and sequential circuits using hardware description languages, VHDL and/or Verilog. They learn the design, verification, and simulation process used in contemporary digital computer design using tools like ModelSim, Precision, and Synplify Pro. This lab supports instruction in microprocessor programming and interfacing, as well as system design involving high-speed pipeline processors and architectures. Specifically, ARM is used as a representative RISC (reduced instruction set computer) processor. Students gain an understanding of embedded computing through assignments that create systems which acquire inputs (data, keyboard entry, A/D etc.) and produce outputs (processed data, displayed data, D/A, etc.). For example, students program an NXT robot that accepts human-supplied controller input and produces signals that drive actuator motors.

Circuits and Signals Lab

This laboratory provides support for instruction and research in the areas of basic analog design, discrete component testing, fundamental circuit design, and communication theory. The laboratory is equipped with CAD facilities capable of schematic capture, circuit simulation, and fault detection. The lab utilizes various test equipment to include, but not limited to, oscilloscopes, signal generators, spectrum analyzers, multi-meters, and high-speed data acquisition equipment.

Academic Computing Lab

This laboratory is the largest PC-equipped learning resource center in Spanagel Hall and the primary PC computational facility for the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. It is primarily a teaching laboratory for accomplishing computer assignments that are assigned as part of ECE courses. It is also used for research-related computing but only when such computing does not interfere with course work. The laboratory serves approximately 350 students annually and supports over 25 courses and over 12 curricula. It is also heavily used for student thesis preparation. The computers in this lab are, by necessity, high-end systems because the vast majority of software used in the lab are scientific and engineering applications that are extremely computationally intensive. The NPS Information Technology Assistance Center (ITAC) organization supplies labor for maintenance and upgrading of this facility.

Optical Electronics Lab

This laboratory provides educational and research support in the areas of fiber optics, lasers (including a fiber sigma laser), integrated optics and electro-optics. The laboratory has a variety of fiber optics instrumentation (including two OTDRs, a fusion splicer, optical spectrum analyzer, connector application equipment, a 1.5 Gb/s digital pattern generator and BER tester, an optical fiber amplifier, optical autocorrelator for pulsewidth measurement, various diode laser controllers), RF and microwave instrumentation (signal synthesizer, microwave spectrum analyzer), and general purpose test instrumentation. A variety of detectors, integrated optical modulators and imaging equipment are also available. The lab supports EC3210, EC3550, EO3911, EC4210, thesis students, and research in fiber optic communications and optical signal processing.

Electromagnetics Lab

This laboratory supports instruction and research in the area of microwave systems and technology. This is accomplished with a mix of hardware, instruments, test systems, and software. Included in the lab inventory are scalar and vector microwave network analyzers, electromagnetic software for simulating antennas, ships and aircraft, and a software design system for simulation of microwave circuits and systems. There is also a fully automated anechoic chamber for antenna pattern measurements.

Radar and Electronic Warfare Systems Lab

The objective of the Radar and Electronic Warfare (EW) Systems Laboratory is to educate military officers and civilians in the technology and operational characteristics of electronic warfare. The Radar and Electronic Warfare Systems Laboratory supports both research and teaching. The hardware laboratory contains instrumented radar and electronic warfare equipment and has been in operation for over 35 years. Each radar system is well instrumented to operate as a teaching tool. The equipment allows the student to experience hands-on knowledge of performance characteristics, conduct experimental research, and reinforces concepts that are taught in the classroom.

Controls and Robotics Lab

This laboratory is mainly an instructional lab that supports experiments for all courses in Guidance, Navigation, Controls, and Robotics. Lab facilities include servo control stations and associated computers (equipped with A/D and D/A data acquisition cards, LabView, and Matlab/SIMULINK software) that are used to conduct simulations and physical experiments, modeling, analysis, and design of control systems. The lab is also equipped with advanced robots to support robotics laboratory assignments and thesis projects in robotics.

Power Systems Lab

The Power Systems Laboratory supports postgraduate education and thesis research related to the design, analysis, simulation and implementation of power converter and electric drive technology. Thesis research projects are closely coupled to current Department of Defense priorities including more-survivable power system architectures such as DC Zonal Electric Distribution, Integrated Power Systems, and electric propulsion. In coursework and projects, students employ modern device technologies, hardware-in-the-loop synthesis tools, simulation packages, measurement devices, and power converter and electric machine modules to assess component operation, develop feedback controls, and study evolving power system challenges. An emphasis is placed on prototyping and validating against detailed simulation models.

Digital Signal Processing Lab

This laboratory supports instruction and research in the area of Digital Signal Processing. Research and student thesis include work in the areas of detection and classification of signals, face recognition, acoustic communications, multirate signal processing and other areas. Lab facilities include several Windows based workstations and the capability of programming Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) for real time applications.

Computer Communications and Networking Lab

This laboratory supports instruction and research in computer network design, engineering, and infrastructure development. The lab is currently divided between guided media (wire and fiber optic) networks and wireless networks. The lab also has facilities within the NPS High Performance Computing lab for network simulation and experimentation. Thesis work and research undertaken include modeling and simulation of high-speed and wireless networks and related protocols, video transmission and voice transmission over digital networks, traffic modeling, simulation and analysis, design and simulation of wide area networks, and related areas. Guided media lab facilities include routers, LAN switches, Voice-over-IP servers, Telcom fiber optic switches, ATM switches, video processing equipment, a channel simulator, protocol analyzers, network simulation packages, and computer workstations. The wireless lab facilities include WiFi, WiMax, VoIP, and sensor mote equipment, as well as a variety of signal generation and analysis equipment.

Secure Computing Lab

This lab contains computing facilities for classified projects (up to the SECRET level). It contains a variety of computing platforms from Windows-based PCs to a Linux cluster. The lab is also heavily used by students preparing classified documents including class presentations and theses.

Cryptologic Research Lab (CRL)

This laboratory is the NPS's center for research in communications engineering, focusing on physical layer design issues for wireless communications devices. Research areas emphasized are non-binary modulation, forward error correction coding, software defined radio, spread spectrum systems, cellular systems, wireless local and wide area networks, and interference mitigation. The CRL's facilities include many tools for modern communications engineering, such as eight software defined radio design stations; a state-of-the-art wireless fading channel simulator; arbitrary waveform generators; microprocessor-, digital signal processor (DSP)-, and field programmable gate array (FPGA)-based signal possessing development systems; and various signal generation, capture, and analysis tools.

Flash X-ray Lab

The NPS Flash X-ray Laboratory provides DoD support, testing and research capability to study weapons effects on electronics. It provides a Gamma radiation source to verify operation of electronic circuit and systems in a nuclear weapons environment. The machine can additionally be used to study Electro Magnetic Pulse for nuclear or microwave weapons. This is one of two Flash X-ray systems in the Navy (NRL).

Signal Enhancement Lab

The ECE department does a significant amount of research in wireless communications functions, both transmitting and receiving, in-the-clear and encrypted, solving interference, electromagnetic compatibility and radio spectrum utilization issues. Applications include Direction Finding, Improvised Explosive Device detection and jamming, and low-profile and Ultra-Wide-Band antenna development. This laboratory provides hardware and software support of these projects and is entirely research-supported.

Other support facilities within the department include the Calibration and Instrument Repair Laboratory. Classified instruction and research are supported by appropriately certified facilities.

Calibration and Repair Lab

The Calibration Lab and Electronics Repair Lab is a dual function facility that provides Electronics Calibration capabilities and Electronics General Repair functions.

The Electronics Test Equipment Repair Lab is a full-time, stand-alone repair facility. It provides a wide repair support for all NPS Electronics Test Equipment that are listed in the Property Book Inventories, maintained by each department. Repair parts, test equipment and library of repair and service manuals are also maintained on site.

The Calibration Lab is a Type 4 Electronics Field Repair Facility (FCA) assigned to region METCALPAC, Tech HQ, NAVSEASYSCOM. All test equipment that falls within the assigned Phase Packages (4 Phases) are all supported.

Electrical and Computer Engineering Course Descriptions

EC Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<EC Courses EC0810-EC2990>

EC0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course. Prerequisites: None.

EC0820 Integrated project (0-12) As Required

This course is available to students in the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department who are participating in an integrated project. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

EC0950 Seminar (No Credit) (0-1) As Required

Lectures on subjects of current interest will be presented by invited guests from other universities, government laboratories, and from industry, as well as by faculty members of the Naval Postgraduate School. Prerequisites: None.

EC1010 Introduction to Matlab (1-1) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

An introductory course for students with little or no programming background using MATLAB. Basic concepts of the MATLAB environment are considered, such as matrix operations, vector and matrix manipulations, equation solving, simulation, programming, and graphing. This course prepares students for using MATLAB in future course work in the ECE department. Graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisites: None.

EC2010 Probabilistic Analysis of Signals and Systems (3-1) Summer/Winter

The foundations of signals and systems are developed from probabilistic and statistical approaches. Emphasis is on signal processing, communication systems, and computer networks relevant to military applications. Topics include probability, random variables, and random sequences; density and distribution functions; deterministic versus nondeterministic signals; expectation, the dc and the r.m.s. values of nondeterministic signals, correlation and covariance; radar and sonar signal detection; LTI systems, transformation of random variables and the central limit theorem; basic queuing theory and computer communication networks. Prerequisites: EC2410 (may be taken concurrently).

EC2100 Circuit Analysis (3-2) Summer/Winter

The fundamental circuit analysis course for Electrical Engineering majors. The course considers circuit principles, circuit topology, direct current circuits, natural response, forced response, total response, impedance concepts, the application of the Laplace transformation to solve circuit problems and device transfer functions. The laboratories will utilize both computer software and hands-on exercises. Prerequisites: PH1322, MA1043, and MA2121 (may be concurrent).

EC2110 Circuit Analysis II (3-2) Fall

A continuation of EC2100. The course considers circuit principles, impedance concepts and steady-state ac circuits, ac power, frequency response and selectivity, basics of operational amplifiers and an introduction to machines and power converters. Prerequisites: EC2100.

EC2200 Introduction to Electronics Engineering (3-3) Summer/Winter

An introduction to electronic devices and circuits. Solid state physics and semiconductor fundamentals. Properties of p-n junctions in diodes; Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT) and Field Effect Transistors (FET); static and dynamic models for these devices, and their linear and nonlinear applications. Applications of transistors in the design of amplifiers and digital systems. Ideal operational amplifiers characteristics and applications. Fabrication and the design of integrated circuits. Prerequisites: EC2100.

EC2220 Electrical Engineering Design (3-4) Spring

A team-based capstone engineering design course emphasizing the application of electrical engineering principles, devices, and circuits to the design, analysis, implementation, and testing of electronic systems. The intensive laboratory component initially reviews various electronic circuits useful in the design of the final project. Final projects require the design, analysis, implementation, testing and demonstration of an electronic system that also incorporates realistic parameters impacting the design process, such as economics, ergonomics, ethics, environmental impact, safety, etc. Prerequisites: EC2200.

EC2300 Introduction to Control Systems (3-2) Summer/Winter

This course presents classical analysis of feedback control systems using basic principles in the frequency domain (Bode plots) and in the s-domain (root locus). Performance criteria in the time domain such as steady-state accuracy,

transient response specifications, and in the frequency domain such as bandwidth and disturbance rejection are introduced. Simple design applications using root locus and Bode plot techniques will be addressed in the course. Laboratory experiments are designed to expose the students to testing and evaluating mathematical models of physical systems, using computer simulations and hardware implementations.ME2801 and EC2300 are equivalent courses. PREREQUISITES: AE2440/EC2440 and MA2121. This course can be offered as an online course. Familiarity with the MATLAB development environment is assumed.

EC2320 Linear Systems (3-1) Fall

Formulation of system models including state equations, transfer functions, and system diagrams for continuous and sampled-data systems. Computer and analytical solution of system equations. Stability, controllability, and observability are defined. Introduction to design by pole placement using measured and estimated state feedback. Application to military systems is introduced via example. Prerequisites: EC2100 and ability to program in MATLAB.

EC2400 Discrete Systems (3-1) Spring/Fall

Principles of discrete systems, including modeling, analysis and design. Topics include difference equations, convolution, stability, bilateral z-transforms and application to right-sided and left-sided sequences, system diagrams and realizations, and frequency response. Simple digital filters are designed and analyzed. Prerequisites: MA1113 and ability to program in MATLAB.

EC2410 Analysis of Signals and Systems (3-1) Summer/Winter

Analysis of digital and analog signals in the frequency domain; properties and applications of the discrete Fourier transform, the Fourier series, and the continuous Fourier transform; analysis of continuous systems using convolution and frequency domain methods; applications to sampling, windowing, and amplitude modulation and demodulation systems. Prerequisites: MA1113 & ability to program in MATLAB or consent of instructor.

EC2440 Introduction to Scientific Programming (Same as AE2440) (3-2) Winter/Summer

This course offers an introduction to computer system operations and program development using NPS computer facilities. The main goal of this course is to provide an overview of different structured programming techniques, along with introduction to MATLAB/Simulink/GUIDE and to use modeling as a tool for scientific and engineering applications. The course discusses the accuracy of digital computations, ways to incorporate symbolic computations, and presents numerical methods in MATLAB functions. PREREQUISITES: Knowledge of single variable calculus and matrix algebra. This course can be offered as an online course.

EC2450 Accelerated Review of Signals and Systems (4-0) As Required

An advanced review of continuous and discrete system theory intended for students who have previous education in these areas. Topics covered by each student will depend upon background and competence in the subject matter of EC2400, EC2410, and EC2320. Prerequisites: Sufficient background in linear systems theory. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

EC2500 Communications Systems (3-2) Spring/Fall

In this first course on the electrical transmission of signals, the theory, design, and operation of analog and digital communication systems are investigated. Included are A/D conversion, modulation, demodulation, frequency-division multiplexing, and time-division multiplexing. Prerequisites: EC2200 and EC2410.

EC2650 Fundamentals of Electromagnetic Fields (4-1) Spring/Fall

This course covers electromagnetic field theory and engineering applications. Both static and dynamic electric and magnetic field theory is covered. The complete theory is presented in terms of Maxwell's equations and boundary conditions. Applications include induction, plane wave propagation in lossless and lossy media, analysis of finite transmission lines, and plane wave reflection. Labs provide practical experience with microwave instruments, components, and measurement techniques. Prerequisites: MA1116 or equivalent.

EC2820 Digital Logic Circuits (3-2) Spring/Fall

An introductory course in the analysis and design of digital logic circuits that are the basis for military and civilian computers and digital systems. No previous background in digital concepts or electrical engineering is assumed. Topics include: data representation, Boolean algebra, logic function minimization, the design and application of combinatorial and sequential SSI, MSI, and LSI logic functions including PLAs and ROMs, and the fundamentals of finite state machine design and applications. Laboratories are devoted to the analysis, design, implementation, construction, and debugging of combinatorial and sequential logic circuits using SSI, MSI, LSI, and programmable logic devices. Prerequisites: None.

EC2840 Introduction to Microprocessors (3-2) Summer/Winter

An introduction to the organization and operation of micro processing and microcomputers, both key embedded elements of military systems. Topics include: the instruction set, addressing methods, data types and number systems, stack and register organization, exception processing, assembly language programming techniques including macros, assembly language implementation of typical control structures, data structures, and subroutine linkage methods. Laboratory sessions teach a systematic method for program design and implementation. The laboratory assignments consist of a series of programs which collectively implement a major software project. Prerequisites: A high level language.

EC2990 Design Projects in Electrical Engineering (0-8) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Design projects under the supervision of faculty members. Individual or team projects involving the design of devices or systems. Projects will typically be in support of faculty members. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

<EC Courses EC3000-EC3460>

EC3000 Introduction to Graduate Research (1-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

This course is designed to prepare students to undertake graduate research and to write a thesis or dissertation. The first part of the course provides an overview of (1) the NPS Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the department's research program and its faculty, (2) the NPS Research Program and the organization and functions of the NPS Research Office, (3) NPS library electronic resources, (4) an overview of S&T planning in the DoD, and (5) guidance on the thesis process. In the second part of the course, research opportunities are presented by the faculty. A broader view of the field of electrical and computer engineering is gained through student attendance at ECE Department seminars delivered by outside speakers. In the third part of the course, students are exposed to thesis research currently being carried out in the ECE Department by attending thesis presentations delivered by graduating students. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

EC3110 Electrical Energy: Present and Emerging Technologies (3-2) Spring

This course presents electrical energy topics for on shore facilities, expeditionary and ship applications divided into three categories; generation, distribution and consumption. For these three categories the current state of the art is presented first and then expounded with emerging technologies including renewable energy sources, energy harvesting, smart grid, micro-grids, smart metering, energy management systems, flexible AC transmission systems (FACTS), battery management systems, all electric and hybrid transportation systems, more efficient loads such as lighting, motors and power converters. PREREQUISITE: EC2100 or EO2102 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

EC3130 Electrical Machinery Theory (4-2) Winter

An introduction to the analysis of magnetically-coupled circuits, dc machines, induction machines, and synchronous machines. The course will include explicit derivations of torque, voltage, and flux linkage equations, formulation of steady-state circuits, development of reference frame theory, and the basics of machine simulation as required in shipboard electric drive analysis. Prerequisites: EC2100.

EC3150 Solid State Power Conversion (3-2) Summer

A detailed analytical approach is presented for the operation, performance, and control of the important types of solid state power converters found in naval shipboard power systems. The course reviews the characteristics of power semiconductor switching devices. A systems approach is used to analyze high power converters: phase controlled rectifiers, line commutated inverters, self-commutated inverters, transistor converters, and switching regulators. Prerequisites: EC2100 or consent of instructor.

EC3200 Advanced Electronics Engineering (3-2) Spring

Characteristics of differential and multistage amplifiers. Transistors frequency response, including Bipolar Junction Transistors (BJT), Junction Field Effect Transistors (JFET), and Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors (MOSFET); characteristics and design consideration. Integrated circuit OPAMP applications; analysis and design of non-ideal OPAMPs. Applications of BJTs and Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductors (CMOS) in integrated circuits, and different biasing techniques. Analysis and design of digital circuits, including Transistor Logic (TTL), Emitter Coupled Logic (ECL), and CMOS logic families. Applications and design feedback amplifiers and operational amplifiers applications in analog filters and oscillators. Prerequisites: EC2200.

EC3210 Introduction to Electro-Optical Engineering (4-1) Fall

An overview of the elements that comprise current military electro-optical and infrared (EO/IR) systems. Topics include properties of light, optical elements, quantum theory of light emission, operating principles of laser sources, propagation of Gaussian beams, laser sources, laser modulators, thermal sources of radiation, laser and IR detectors (photomultipliers, photoconductors, photodiodes, avalanche photodiodes), signal-to-noise analysis of direct- and heterodyne-receiver systems. Includes military applications of electro-optic and infrared technology such as missile seekers, laser designators, laser weapons, and Bragg-cell signal processors. Prerequisites: EC2200 and EC2650.

EC3220 Semiconductor Device Technologies (3-2) Fall

This course is intended to familiarize the student with solid state device operation and fabrication of present day semiconductors and transistor technologies. Topics include: fundamental theory of charge transport, semiconductor materials (Si, GaAs, SiGe, InP), bandgap engineering, epitaxy crystal growth, and semiconductor device manufacturing technology. A virtual wager lab is accomplished in the software labs to visualize parameters as impurity implants to electron flow. Measurement labs will utilize hands-on wafter probe measurements of digital and analog devices. Prerequisites: EC2200 or equivalent.

EC3230 Space Power and Radiation Effects (Formerly EO3205) (3-1) Spring

Fundamentals of different power systems utilized in spacecraft; photovoltaic power technology; solid-state physics, silicon solar cells, solar cell measurement and modeling, gallium arsenide cells and II-V compounds in general, array designs and solar dynamics. Radiation effects on solid state devices and materials. Survivability of solar cells and integrated circuits in space environment and annealing method. Other space power systems including chemical and nuclear (radioisotope thermoelectric generators and nuclear reactors). Energy storage devices and power conversion. Spacecraft power supply design. Note: EC3230 is taught with compressed scheduling (first six weeks of quarter). Prerequisites: EC2200.

EC3240 Renewable Energy at Military Bases and for the Warfighter (3-2) Summer

The course will introduce participants to current energy use at military bases as well as mobile platforms power sources. Participants will be introduced to state-of-the-art renewable energy systems that would be utilized at military installations. This will include; detailed study of Photovoltaic & Solar Energy use, overview of wind energy & other renewable energy sources, as well as energy storage systems. Cost saving comparisons and environmental impact will be conducted. The course will also investigate the use of some of the above renewable systems in mobile platforms for the warfighters and expeditionary forces personal use. PREREQUISITE: EC2100 or EO2102 (or equivalent basic course in Electrical Engineering.)

EC3280 Introduction to MEMS Design (3-3) As Required

This is a 4.5 credit hour class introducing the students to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Topics include material considerations for MEMS and microfabrication fundamentals. Surface, bulk and non-silicon micromachining. Forces and transduction; forces in micro-nano-domains and actuation techniques. Case studies of MEMS based microsensor, microactuator and microfluidic devices. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) of MEMS devices and small group design project. Prerequisites: basic understanding of electrical and mechanical structures: EC2200 or MS2201 or PH1322 or consent of instructor.

EC3310 Optimal Estimation: Sensor and Data Association (3-2) Winter

The subject of this course is optimal estimation and Kalman filtering with extensions to sensor fusion and data association. Main topics include the theory of optimal and recursive estimation in linear (Kalman filter) and nonlinear (extended Kalman filter) systems, with applications to target tracking. Topics directly related to applications, such as basic properties of sensors, target tracking models, multihypothesis data association algorithms, reduced order probabilistic models and heuristic techniques, will also be discussed. Examples and projects will be drawn from radar, EW, and ASW systems. Prerequisites: EC2320, EC2010, and MA2043 or consent of instructor.

EC3320 Optimal Control Systems (3-2) Spring

This course addresses the problem of designing control systems which meet given optimization criteria. The student is exposed to the development of the theory, from dynamic programming to the calculus of variation, and learns how to apply it in control engineering. Prerequisites: EC2300, EC2320.

EC3400 Digital Signal Processing (3-2) Spring/Fall

The foundations of one-dimensional digital signal processing techniques are developed. Topics include Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) algorithms, block convolution, the use of DFT and FFT to compute convolution, and design methods for nonrecursive and recursive digital filters. Multirate signal processing techniques are also introduced for sampling rate conversion, efficient analog to digital, digital to analog conversion, time frequency decomposition using filter banks and quadrature mirror filters. Computer-aided design techniques are emphasized. The algorithms introduced have direct applications in sonar and radar signal processing, IR sensor arrays, modern navy weapon systems, and also in voice and data communications. Prerequisites: EC2410 or EC2400.

EC3410 Discrete-Time Random Signals (3-2) Summer/Winter

Fundamentals of random processes are developed with an emphasis on discrete time for digital signal processing, control, and communications. Parameter estimation concepts are introduced, and impact of uncertainty in parameter evaluation (estimated moments and confidence intervals) are presented. Random processes are introduced. DKLT and applications to image processing and classification problems are considered. Impact of linear transformations to linear systems is discussed. FIR Wiener, and matched filters are introduced. IIR Wiener filter introduced, time permitting. Applications to signal and system characterization in areas such as system identification, forecasting, and equalizations are considered to illustrate concepts discussed during the course. Prerequisites: EC2410 (may be concurrent) and EC2010.

EC3450 Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics (4-0) Fall

Introduction to various mathematical techniques (both exact and approximate), special functions (e.g., Bessel functions, Hankel functions, and Legendre polynomials), orthogonality relationships, etc., that are used to model and solve real world problems concerning the propagation of sound in the ocean. Topics include, for example, reflection and transmission coefficients, ocean waveguide pulse-propagation models based on normal mode and full-wave theory, the WKB approximation, three-dimensional ray acoustics, and the parabolic equation approximation. Prerequisites: Standard undergraduate sequence of calculus and physics courses for engineering and science students.

EC3460 Introduction to Machine Learning for Signal Analytics (3-2) Winter

This course introduces basic concepts and tools needed to detect, analyze, model, and extract useful information from digital signals by finding patterns in data. It covers some of the fundamentals of machine learning as they apply in signal and information processing. The emphasis in the course is on practical engineering applications rather than theoretical derivations to give participants a broad understanding of the issues involved in the learning process. Supervised learning tools such as the Bayes estimator, neural networks and radial basis functions, support vector machines and kernel methods are presented. Unsupervised learning tools such as k-means and hierarchical clustering are discussed. Data transformation and dimensionality reduction are introduced. Performance measures designed to evaluate learning algorithms are introduced. Concepts presented are illustrated throughout the course via several application projects of specific interest to defense related communities. Application topics may include target/signal identification, channel equalization, speech/speaker recognition, image classification, blind source separation, power load forecasting, and others of current interest. Prerequisites: knowledge of probability and random variables (EC2010, or OS2080, or OA3101, or equivalent), linear systems (EC2410 or equivalent), linear algebra (MA2043 or equivalent), ability to program in MATLAB, or consent of instructor.

<EC Courses EC3500-EC3910, 30,...90>

EC3500 Analysis of Random Signals (4-0) Fall

Fundamental concepts and useful tools for analyzing non-deterministic signals and noise in military communication, control, and signal processing systems are developed. Topics include properties of random processes, correlation functions, energy and spectral densities, linear systems and mean square estimation, noise models and special processes. Prerequisites: EC2500 (may be concurrent) and EC2010, or consent of instructor.

EC3510 Communications Engineering (Unclassified) 3-1 (Winter)

The influence of noise and interference on the design and selection of digital and analog communications systems is analyzed. Topics include link budget analysis and signal-to-noise ratio calculations, receiver performance for various analog and digital modulation techniques, and bandwidth and signal power trade-offs. Examples of military communications systems are included. Prerequisites: EC3500 or EC3410.

EC3600 Antennas and Propagation (3-2) Summer/Winter

A fundamental understanding of antennas, scattering, and propagation is developed. Characteristics and design principles of common antenna types such as dipoles, arrays, horns, reflectors and microstrip patches, are considered. Concepts of antenna gain and effective area are used to develop power link equations. Scattering theory is introduced and propagation phenomena are considered for real-world scenarios. Design applications include phased, Yagi and log-periodic arrays, as well as shaped-beam reflector antennas, sidelobe suppression, radar target scattering, stealth principles, surface waves, HF and satellite communications. Prerequisite: EC2650 or equivalent.

EC3610 Microwave Engineering (3-2) Spring

This course provides an overview of the circuits and devices used in microwave radar communication and electronic warfare systems. The course covers network analysis using scattering parameters, transmission media, selected circuits, electron tubes, solid state devices, and monolithic integrated circuits. Circuits and devices are studied in the laboratory using both hardware and computer simulation. Prerequisite: EC2650.

EC3630 Radiowave Propagation (3-2) Spring

This course treats the effects of the earth and its atmosphere on the propagation of electromagnetic waves at radio frequencies. Topics covered include ground waves, sky waves, ducting, reflection, refraction, diffraction, scattering, attenuation, and fading. Basic theory is covered and computer models are introduced where appropriate. Emphasis is placed on determination of the transmission loss between transmitting and receiving antennas. Computer laboratory exercises are used to illustrate the propagation characteristics of various indoor and outdoor environments, and their effects on system performance. Prerequisites: EC2650 or consent of instructor.

EC3700 Joint Network-Enabled Electronic Warfare I (3-2) Fall

The concept of information operations (IO) and the critical role for electronic warfare (EW) are examined. The net-enabled force transformation is presented emphasizing how network-enabled EW technology provides a force multiplier for this transformation. Important EW technology components of SeaPower-21 are emphasized. The network space – battlespace duality and the Global Information Grid are also analyzed (FORCEnet). Metrics are presented to quantify the information value from wireless networks of distributed sensors and weapons. A direct assessment of the value of the network (information superiority) to the combat outcome (battlespace superiority) is presented. Integrated air defense suppression examples are studied using game theory to demonstrate the concepts. The role of intelligence also is emphasized. Sensor technologies and their use in the battlespace are presented. Mathematical models for electronic attack (EA) techniques are developed including those against GPS, RF and IR sensors. Off-board EA techniques including chaff, towed and rocket decoys, and digital image synthesizers are emphasized for counter-surveillance, counter-targeting and counter-terminal. High-power microwave and laser-based directed energy weapons are examined. Sensor protection techniques are discussed including an introduction to the new area of counter-electronic support. Students do a research project on a topic of interest from the Force Transformation Roadmap. Laboratory exercises are also conducted in the Radar and Electronic Warfare Laboratory. Prerequisites: EC2500 and EC2650 or equivalent.

EC3710 Computer Communications Methods (3-2) Spring/Fall

The course objective is to develop an understanding of computer communications networks with emphasis on the requirements of military environments and the U.S. Navy's combat platforms. Coverage includes the essential topics of network topology, connectivity, queuing delay, message throughput, and performance analysis. The layered network architectures, such as the seven-layer OSI model and DoD's TCP/IP protocol suite, are covered. The techniques and protocols used in these layers are discussed. Local area networking technologies such as Ethernet, FDDI and wireless Ethernet, and wide area technologies such as X.25 and frame relay are covered. Principles of networking devices (hubs, switches, and routers) are presented. Some distributed applications are presented briefly. Prerequisites: EC2010 and EC2500.

EC3730 Cyber Network and Physical Infrastructures (3-2) Winter

Cyber infrastructure systems and technologies of interest to the military. Copper and fiber media networks, telecommunication networks and signaling, the Internet, enterprise networks, network-centric sensing, collection, monitoring, dissemination, and distribution of critical data. Terrestrial wireless networks: cellular networks, local area and long haul data networks (GSM, WiFi, WiMAX, LTE, Link 16 and Link 22). Space based networks: satellite communication networks, wide area large sensor networks. Heterogeneous networks: end-la-end communication, sensing, collection, and distribution across fiber, terrestrial wireless, and satellite networks, protocols, design and performance analysis. Control and overlay networks such as Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and the National power grid. Prerequisites: EC2500 and understanding of basic communication systems and networks.

EC3740 Reverse Engineering in Electronic Systems (3-2) Summer

Presents fundamental, systems-level concepts for developing an understanding of system functionality without a prior access to the system's design specifications. Considers generalized approaches to developing a set of specifications for a complex system through orderly examination of specimens of that system. Illustrates procedures for identifying the system's components and their interrelationships. Demonstrates methods for creating representations of the system in another form or at a higher level of abstraction. Presents fundamental definitions for forward engineering, reverse engineering, design recovery, restructuring and reengineering. Basic analysis techniques such as impulse response will be introduced. System identification techniques such as parameter estimation, Markov models and linear time-invariant (LTI) theory will be used to build dynamical models from observed data. Case studies from several domain areas will be presented to include: integrated circuit (IC) and circuit board analysis, communications protocol analysis, software disassembly, and programmable logic verification. Prerequisites: EC3730 or consent of instructor.

EC3750 Introduction to SIGINT Engineering (3-2) Fall

An introduction to the technology of signals intelligence systems, with particular emphasis on the means for accessing signals of intelligence value. Covers the three major branches of SIGINT: communications intelligence, electronic intelligence, and foreign instrumentation signals intelligence. Collection platform, receivers, and antennas are examined. Emitter location techniques are considered. Prerequisites: EC3410 or EC3500 or EO3512, U.S. citizenship and Top Secret clearance with eligibility for SCI access.

EC3760 Information Operations Systems (3-2) Winter

This course examines the Network-centric Environment that is the focus of the Information Operations (IO) infrastructure with emphasis on current and future implementation models. A Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) approach is taken in which the adversary's computer network system architecture is examined and evaluated for the purpose of exploitation, protection, and/or attack. A thorough review of the fundamentals of communications, computer networks, and advanced digital technologies is discussed. This course works closely with the Department of Defense to reinforce realistic approaches for solving critical IO issues within the community. Prerequisites: EC2500 OR EO2512 or consent of instructor. Classification: U.S. citizenship and TOP SECRET clearance with eligibility for SCI access.

EC3800 Microprocessor Based System Design (3-2) Fall

Advanced microprocessor system concepts are studied. Microprocessor systems are widely used for embedded control in military systems as well as for stand-alone computers. Topics covered are CPU operation and timing, address decoding, typical LSI support chips, exception processing, design of static and dynamic memory systems, worst-case timing analysis, bus arbitration, and direct memory access controllers. The laboratory consists of a design project integrating hardware and software using a state-of-the-art development system. Prerequisites: EC2820.

EC3820 Computer Systems (3-2) Summer

The course presents a unified approach for the design of computer systems stressing the interacting processes implemented in hardware, software, and firmware. General features of operating systems are studied as well as specific features of an existing system. The elements of a multiprogramming system are introduced. Prerequisite: EC2840.

EC3830 Digital Computer Design Methodology (3-2) Winter

A design and project-oriented course covering basic principles, theories, and techniques for practical design of digital systems. Emphasizes an integrated viewpoint combining essential elements of classical switching theory with a thorough understanding of modern design aids. Current military and commercial systems are used as design examples. Prerequisite: EC2820.

EC3840 Introduction to Computer Architecture (3-2) Spring

The fundamental principles of computer architecture and processor design, including the influences of implementation technology, cost, performance, and the historical development of computer architecture. Levels of abstraction and instruction set/architecture design. Processor design and implementation, including the data path and the control unit. Computer design, including buses, the memory hierarchy, and the input/output subsystem. Factors affecting performance and performance measurement, evaluation, and comparison. The effects of embedded military applications on computer architecture. Prerequisites: EC2820.

EC3860 Trustworthy Computer Hardware Analysis and Design (3-2) Spring

This course initially presents a detailed review of the techniques, methods, and tools used by engineers to design and implement modern, high-performance, digital circuits, systems, and computers. This is followed by a detailed review of implementation technologies, at all levels of integration from discrete devices to complete systems on a chip, including the use of COTS, ASIC, and programmable devices, that are typically used for implementing a wide range of digital systems including servers, desk-top computers, embedded computers, reconfigurable computers, and network routers and switches. Course material then focuses on the vulnerabilities of the design, implementation, and manufacturing processes to the covert addition of malicious functionality, as well as the vulnerabilities of the underlying implementation technology. Finally, the techniques and methods required to design, implement, and manufacture trusted, high-performance, digital circuits, systems, and computers are studied. Corequisite: EC3740.

EC3910, 20, 30,...90 Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (V-V) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Courses on special topics in Electrical Engineering are offered under these numbers. In most cases, new courses are offered as special topics of current interest with the possibility of being developed as regular courses. See the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department's on-line catalog for current offerings.

<EC Courses EC4000-EC4360>

EC4000 Introduction to Doctoral Research (2-0) Spring/Fall

The main objectives of the course are to foster interaction among the doctoral students and the department faculty and to promote excellence in research. Additional objectives of the course are to prepare the doctoral students to initiate the screening and qualifying steps of the program, to undertake dissertation research, and to publish and present research results. Along with an overview of the ECE Ph.D. program, the course provides guidance on the program preliminaries, such as the screening and qualification exams and minor requirements, and the dissertation research process. A broad overview of the current research problems in the field of electrical and computer engineering relating to the needs of national defense and in the ECE department in particular is presented. Students in the early stages of their program will be exposed to ongoing dissertation research and advances in the field through research presentations delivered by doctoral students in the research phase of their program, NPS faculty and outside researchers. The course provides the opportunity for doctoral students at all levels of progress to meet once a week to discuss their research, share ideas, rehearse conference presentations and dissertation defenses, and to gain exposure to a diversity of research topics and ideas. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only. PREREQUISITE: Approved ECE Ph.D. student or Consent of the ECE Ph.D. Program Committee.

EC4010 Principles of Systems Engineering (3-2) Spring/Fall

An introduction to systems engineering concepts and methods for the design and integration of complex defense systems, with emphasis on electrical engineering applications. Familiarity with the systems engineering process is developed through case studies of representative defense systems and a group design project which includes determination of system requirements from mission needs and operational requirements. Digital simulation models, including those in current use by DoD, are used to determine engineering and performance tradeoffs. Prerequisites: Four quarters in an NPS engineering curriculum or equivalent.

EC4130 Advanced Electrical Machinery Systems (4-2) Spring

Advanced analysis of detailed and reduced-order representations of shipboard electric machinery and power electronic drives. This course will include extensions to 3-phase machine and network connections, constant flux and current source control, extensive simulation examples including saturation and open-phase conditions, comprehensive investigation of linearized and reduced-order machine and drive representations, the modeling and control of a dc link system, and the fundamentals of AC machine vector control. Prerequisites: EC3130.

EC4150 Advanced Solid State Power Conversion (4-1) Fall

Design and analysis of modern power electronic drives with particular emphasis on electric drives for present and future ship propulsion systems and variable frequency/variable speed power converters for advanced shipboard electric power distribution. Electrical and mechanical systems compatibility and electrical system interfacing topics are addressed. This course begins by examining the non-ideal aspects of power semiconductor switches and other components. In addition, dynamic performance of power electronic circuits is explored. The course includes some more advanced topics like resonant converters and active power line conditioners. Prerequisites: EC3150 and electrical machine theory, or consent of instructor.

EC4210 Electro-Optic Systems Engineering (3-0) Winter

Advanced topics and application of electro-optics. Military applications of electro-optic and infrared technology such as laser communications, laser radar, and Bragg cell signal processors. Signal-to-noise analysis of laser detector performance. Student reports on EO/IR topics of current military interest. Prerequisites: EC3210.

EC4220 Introduction to Analog Vlsi (3-1) Summer

Modern active circuit design topologies; analog and sampled data networks. Analysis of transfer function properties, stability and causality. Higher order filter design and synthesis. Use of computer simulation tools, SPICE, and different device models for network analysis. Transformation methods and switched-capacitor filtering and non-filtering applications. Introduction to analog VLSI techniques using stray-insensitive switched-capacitor networks. Examples of such analog VLSI designs in military applications. Prerequisites: EC2400 and EC3200 or EC2200 with consent of instructor.

EC4230 Reliability Issues for Military Electronics (3-1) Winter

This course investigates where and why semiconductor devices fail in military environments. Topics include limitations of commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) integrated circuits, thermal failure, electrostatic breakdown, noise in solid state devices, packaging reliability issues, radiation effects due to space and nuclear environments, and the limited availability of military integrated circuit suppliers. Prerequisites: EC3220.

EC4280 Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design II (2-4) As Required

Same as ME4780 and PH4280. This is the second course in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design. This course will expose students to advanced topics on material considerations for MEMS, microfabrication techniques, forces in the micro- and nano-domains, and circuits and systems issues. Case studies of MEMS-based microsensors, microactuators, and microfluidic devices will be discussed. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) and characterization of existing MEMS devices. The grades will be based on exams, lab projects, and a group design project. Prerequisites: ME/EC/PH3280 or ME3780 or consent of instructor.

EC4300 Advanced Topics in Modern Control Systems (3-1) As Required

Advanced topics and current developments in control systems are presented in this course. The list of special topics includes (but it is not limited to) robotics systems, autonomous vehicles, and design by robust techniques. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

EC4310 Fundamentals of Robotics (3-2) Fall

This course presents the fundamentals of land-based robotic systems covering the areas of locomotion, manipulation, grasping, sensory perception, and tele-operation. Main topics include kinematics, dynamics, manipulability, motion/force control, real-time programming, controller architecture, motion planning, navigation, and sensor integration. Several Nomad mobile robots will be used for class projects. Military applications of robotic systems will be discussed. Prerequisites: MA3042; either EC2300 or EC2320, or consent of instructor.

EC4320 Design of Robust Control Systems (3-2) Winter

This course presents advanced topics on control system design. Major emphasis is on robust techniques in order to account for uncertainties on the systems to be controlled. Several applications show the trade-offs in several applications, such as missile and/or underwater vehicles control design. Advanced concepts on H2 and H-infinity will be introduced as part of the course. Prerequisites: EC3310, EC3320.

EC4330 Navigation, Missile, and Avionics Systems (3-2) Spring

Principles of missile guidance, including guidance control laws, basic aerodynamics and six degree-of-freedom motion simulation. Additional topics are selected from the following areas to address the general interests of the class: advanced guidance laws, passive sensors, INS guidance, fire control and tracking systems, and ballistic missile targeting. Prerequisites: EC3310. Classification: U.S. citizenship and SECRET clearance.

EC4350 Nonlinear Control Systems (3-2) Spring

This course presents techniques for automatic control of nonlinear systems with application to current military and robotic systems. Main topics include the analysis and design of nonlinear systems with phase plane and describing function methods, Lyapunov and sliding mode control techniques. Accuracy limit cycles, jump resonances, relay servos, and discontinuous systems will also be considered. Prerequisites: EC2300, EC2320.

<EC Courses EC4400-EC4590>

EC4400 Advanced Topics in Signal Processing (3-0) As Required

Special advanced topics in signal processing not currently covered in a regularly scheduled course and relevant to advanced naval and other military applications. Topics may include digital filter structures and implementations, advanced computational topics and architectures for signal processing, imaging, recent work in signal modeling, array processing, or other topics of interest. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

EC4430 Multimedia Information and Communications (3-1) Fall

The course objective is to present essentials of real-time communication of digital multimedia (audio, video and text) information over packet-switched networks by bringing together topics from digital signal processing (information processing), digital communications (information transmission and reception), and computer networking (information distribution). Algorithms for compression of multimedia information are presented. Related international standards, such as G.728, JPEC, MPE3, MP3, LZW, and IS95, are discussed. Major topics include digital representation and compression of multimedia information, transmission (storage) and distribution of compressed information, and end-to-end delivery issues, such as loss, reliability, security and encryption of multimedia information. Prerequisites: EC3410 or EC3500.

EC4440 Statistical Digital Signal Processing (3-2) Fall

Modern methods of digital signal processing are developed in this course from a statistical point of view. Methods are developed for processing random signals through statistical data analysis and modeling. Topics include adaptive filtering, linear prediction, MA, AR, and ARMA signal modeling, lattice structures, and an introduction to subspace methods and other modern methods of spectrum estimation. Techniques presented are applied to various engineering problems such as system identification, forecasting, and equalization. The algorithms introduced have direct applications in communication, sonar, radar systems signal processing, and modern Navy weapon systems. Prerequisites: EC3410 or EC3500 and MA2043 or consent of instructor.

EC4450 Sonar Systems Engineering (4-1) Winter

Mathematical development and discussion of fundamental principles that pertain to the design and operation of passive and active sonar systems critical to naval operations. Topics from complex aperture theory, array theory, and signal processing are covered. This course supports the undersea warfare and engineering acoustics curricula and others. Prerequisites: EC3450 or PH3452 or OC3260 and either EC3410 or EC3500 or EO3402 or equivalent.

EC4480 Image Processing and Recognition (3-2) Winter

This course provides image processing background for understanding modern military applications, such as long range target selection, medium range identification, and short range guidance of new weapons systems. Subjects include image sampling and quantization, image representation, enhancement, transformation, encoding, and data compression. Predictive coding, transform coding, and interframe coding techniques are also introduced. 3D to 2D imaging projections are also introduced to extract 3D information either from motion or stereo imaging. Some effort is directed toward image compression techniques particularly suited for multimedia video conferencing. Prerequisites: EC3400.

EC4500 Advanced Topics in Communications (3-0) As Required

Topics and current developments in communications relevant to advanced naval and other military applications. Offered on an occasional basis with the topics determined by the instructor. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

EC4510 Cellular Communications (3-0) Winter

This course presents the fundamentals of cellular communications. Cellular architectures, propagation models, modulation formats, diversity techniques, equalization, error control, multiple access techniques, networking, and standards such as AMPS, N-AMPS, IS-54, GSM, and IS-95 are covered. Prerequisites: May be taken concurrently with EC3510.

EC4530 Soft Radio (3-2) Summer

An introduction to soft radios, devices that generate (transmitter) and/or process (receiver) digital communications signals in software and in reconfigurable hardware. The course covers basic radio frequency (RF) design principles, soft radio architectures, analysis of receiver operation, and existing soft radio efforts. Prerequisite: EC3510 or consent of instructor.

EC4550 Digital Communications (4-0) Spring

This course presents the advantages and limitations of modern military M-ary digital communications systems. M-ary modulation formats, matched filter receivers, probability of symbol error calculations, coherent and non-coherent receivers, carrier and symbol synchronization, modems, bandwidth and signal energy, diversity combining, and fading channels are covered. Examples of current operational and proposed military and commercial space and earth links are treated. Prerequisites: EC3510.

EC4560 Spread Spectrum Communications (3-2) Summer

Methods of reducing the effects of hostile jamming on military radio communications systems are considered. Direct sequence spread spectrum systems and frequency-hopped spread spectrum systems are examined with regard to their LPI, LPD, AJ, and multiple access capabilities. Time-hopped and hybrid systems are also considered. Coarse and fine synchronization problems and techniques are presented. Prerequisites: EC3510.

EC4570 Signal Detection and Estimation (4-0) Winter

Principles of optimal signal processing techniques for detecting signals in noise are considered. Topics include maximum likelihood, Bayes risk, Neyman-Pearson and min-max criteria and calculations of their associated error probabilities (ROC curves). Principles of maximum likelihood, Bayes cost, minimum mean-square error (MMSE), and maximum a posterior estimators are introduced. Integral equations and the Karhunen-Loeve expansion are introduced. The estimator-correlator structure is derived. Emphasis is on dual development of continuous time and discrete time approaches, the latter being most suitable for digital signal processing implementations. This course provides students the necessary foundation to undertake research in military radar and sonar systems. Prerequisites: EC3410 or EC3500.

EC4580 Error Correction Coding (4-0) Fall

Digital military communication systems often employ error control coding to improve effectiveness against noise, fading, and jamming. This course, together with EC4560, provides students the necessary foundations for understanding the principles of such systems. Topics include Shannon's channel capacity theorem and coding methods for error control in digital communications systems, including convolutional, block, concatenated, and turbo codes, as well as trellis-coded modulation. Applications of error control coding to modern digital communications systems are discussed. Prerequisites: EC3510.

EC4590 Communications Satellite Systems Engineering (3-0) Winter

Communication satellite systems including the satellite and user terminals. Subjects include orbital mechanics, satellite description, earth terminals, detailed link analysis, frequency division multiple access, time division multiple access, demand assignment, random multiple access, and spread spectrum multiple access. Various military satellite communications systems are introduced. Prerequisites: EC3510 or EO4516.

<EC Courses EC4600-EC4795>

EC4600 Advanced Topics in Electromagnetics (3-0) As Required

Selected advanced topics in electromagnetics that are not currently covered in regular courses offerings, and relevant to naval and other military applications. Topics may include, but are not limited to, computational electromagnetics, scattering and radiation, propagation, and new device and antenna concepts. Prerequisites: EC3600 or consent of instructor.

EC4610 Radar Systems (3-2) Summer

The radar range equation is developed in a form including signal integration, the effects of target cross-section, fluctuations, and propagation losses. Modern techniques discussed include pulse compression frequency modulated radar, moving target indicator (MTI) and pulse Doppler systems, monopulse tracking systems, multiple unit steerable array radars, and synthetic aperture systems. Laboratory sessions deal with basic pulse radar systems from which the advanced techniques have developed, with pulse compression, and with the measurement of radar cross-section of targets. Prerequisites: EC3600.

EC4630 Radar Cross Section Prediction and Reduction (3-2) Fall

This course covers the design and engineering aspects of stealth and its impact on platform and sensor design. Signature prediction methods in the radar, infrared (IR), and laser frequency bands are discussed. Radar cross section (RCS) analysis methods include geometrical optics and diffraction theory, physical optics and the physical theory of diffraction, and numerical solutions to integral and differential equations. Prediction methods for IR and laser cross sections (LCS) are also introduced. Signature reduction by shaping, materials selection, and active and passive cancelation are applied to each frequency regime. The measurement of these cross sections is also covered. Prerequisites: EC3600 or consent of instructor.

EC4640 Airborne Radar Systems (3-2) Fall

The main objective of this course is to discuss concepts and digital signal processing techniques involved in modern airborne radars, which detect targets in presence of large ground clutter and other interferences. Radar waveform (or modes) are treated as continuous wave (CW), high pulse repetition frequency (HPRF), medium pulse repetition frequency (MPRF), and low pulse repetition frequency (LPRF). Practical implementation and the signal processing associated with each mode will be elaborated. Advantages and limitations of each mode shall be discussed. Military applications of these modes will be discussed in the existing airborne and surface based radar systems. Concepts and algorithms are covered for digital pulse compression, MTI clutter cancelation, Doppler processing, constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection, ambiguity resolution, synthetic array radar (SAR) processing and other associated techniques and algorithms. Prerequisites: EC4610 or equivalent.

EC4680 Joint Network-Enabled Electronic Warfare II (3-2) Spring

The course is intended for U.S. students with Secret clearance. The course continues the discussion of counter electronic support and begins with an introduction to low-probability-of-intercept (LPI) emitter signaling techniques and technologies. The origin and importance of the LPI emitter are emphasized. Case studies are shown to demonstrate the capability of the LPI emitter as an anti-ship capable missile seeker. Network enabled receiver techniques are presented highlighting the benefits of the sensor-shooter-information grid and swarm intelligence. The new challenges facing the intercept receiver design and the trends in receiver technology are addressed. To increase the processing gain of the receiver, time-frequency signal processing methods are presented and include the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution, quadrature mirror filter bank trees for wavelet decomposition and the Choi-Williams distribution. Bi-frequency techniques are also emphasized and include cyclostationary processing for estimating the spectral correlation density of the intercepted signal. Calculations using each signal processing method are shown to demonstrate the output information and its correlation with the input signal parameters. New detection results are then derived by the student for various LPI signaling schemes to illustrate the parameter extraction methods developed. Autonomous emitter classification architectures are also presented. Laboratory simulation exercises are conducted to demonstrate the concepts. Prerequisites: EC3700, U.S. citizenship, and Secret clearance.

EC4690 Joint Network-Enabled Electronic Warfare II (3-2) Spring

The course is intended for international students and contains the same material as EC4680. The course continues the discussion of counter electronic support and begins with an introduction to low-probability-of-intercept (LPI) emitter signaling techniques and technologies. The origin and importance of the LPI emitter are emphasized. Case studies are shown to demonstrate the capability of the LPI emitter as an anti-ship capable missile seeker. Network enabled receiver techniques are presented highlighting the benefits of the sensor-shooter-information grid and swarm intelligence. The new challenges facing the intercept receiver design and the trends in receiver technology are addressed. To increase the processing gain of the receiver, time-frequency signal processing methods are presented and include the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution, quadrature mirror filter bank trees for wavelet decomposition and the Choi-Williams distribution. Bi-frequency techniques are also emphasized and include cyclostationary processing for estimating the spectral correlation density of the intercepted signal. Calculations using each signal processing method are shown to demonstrate the output information and its correlation with the input signal parameters. New detection results are then derived by the student for various LPI signaling schemes to illustrate the parameter extraction methods developed. Autonomous emitter classification architectures are also presented. Laboratory simulation exercises are conducted to demonstrate the concepts. Prerequisites: EC3700.

EC4710 High-Speed Networking (3-2) Summer

The course systematically develops the traffic characteristics of DoD and commercial broadband services (video, voice, text, and other multimedia information) and determines the need for high-speed networks with emphasis on quality of service. Queuing theory is used in the design and analysis of the various modules of a high-speed network: traffic modeling, switches, admission control, scheduling, traffic monitoring, and congestion control. Emerging trends and technologies that enable deployment of high-speed global networks for tactical, commercial, and residential use are discussed. Topics include queuing theory, traffic models, traffic management, and broadband technologies, such as ATM, Gigabit Ethernet, DSL, and cable access. Laboratory is concerned with the use of OPNET for simulation studies of various network topologies. Prerequisites: EC3710 or consent of instructor.

EC4715 Cyber System Vulnerabilities and Risk Assessment (3-2) Summer

The course utilizes reverse engineering principles to identify and assess vulnerabilities in electronic, communication, and control systems and analyze risk to provide tradeoffs. Vulnerabilities in cyber systems based on genetic, developmental, and those caused by system overload are presented. Widely accepted industry and military standards, underlying technologies, specification mismatches and interoperability, and resource constraints are examined to identify vulnerabilities of interest. Vulnerability assessment at component and system level along with prioritization and elimination procedures are discussed. Risk analysis for secure operation of the system and relevant tradeoffs are presented. Laboratory exercises provide hands-on experience. Prerequisite: EC3730, EC3740.

EC4725 Advanced Telecommunication Systems Engineering (3-2) Summer

Studies the engineering of communications transport networks with a particular emphasis on telephony systems. Presents basic concepts in conventional telephony and traffic engineering such as availability, blockage, dimensioning and survivability. Introduces the architecture of Public Switched Telephone Networks (PSTN) and Mobile Switching Networks (MSN). Presents alternatives for enterprise architectures including Private Automatic Branch Exchange (PABX) and Media Gateways (MG). Examines DoN implementations from intra-ship, ship-to-ship and long haul. Discusses approaches to signaling and provisioning. Presents the Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) architecture. Surveys a variety of transport network technologies to include the Synchronous Optical Network (SONET)/Synchronous Digital Hierarchy (SDH) standard, Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM), dark fiber, and metro Ethernet. Introduces carrier-grade Voice-over-Internet Protocol (VoIP) implementations. Concludes with a discussion of Network Management. Prerequisite: EC3710.

EC4730 Covert Communications (3-2) Winter

Electronic signal and data communication mechanisms in which the presence of a message being transmitted is concealed in plain sight of other signals or data are presented. Information hiding in user data, protocol data, and radio, electronic, acoustic and other sensory signals is examined. The techniques of steganography, covert channels, low probability exploitation, and information concealment in analog signals are studied. Techniques and mechanisms for establishing robust, secure covert communication schemes are introduced. The detection, analysis, and abortion of adverse covert communication schemes are discussed. Design of systems suitable for attack and defense of covert communications using programmable logic devices is introduced. Low probability of detect, low probability of intercept, and anti-jamming techniques are reviewed. Embedding and extraction algorithms of steganography are presented. Related topics of watermarking and embedded malware are reviewed. Prerequisite: EC3730 or EC3710.

EC4735 Telecommunications Systems Security (3-2) Fall

Examines underlying technical security issues, policies, standards, implementations, and technologies associated with large-scale commercial telecommunications systems. Reviews the infrastructure and components of carrier class networks to include transport multiplexers and multi-protocol switches. Discusses the public switched telephone network (PSTN) and public land mobile network (PLMN). Begins with a review of the need for Signaling System No. 7 (SS7) and how security is implemented in SS7 networks. Presents fundamental trust assignments in second generation (2G) cellular mobile networks and specifically analyzes trust relationships between core components of the PLMN subsystems. Specifically discusses air interface (Um, Gm) protection measures and presents case studies of systemic flaws. Presents evolutionary changes in security practices in third (3G) and fourth generation (4G) protocols and standards. Examines underlying principles of lawful intercept (LI) implementation and discusses the evolution of LI capability from the PSTN through 3G and 4G networks. Studies the protection of data services in the PLMN and IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS). Specifically focuses on the General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) Tunneling Protocol (GTP) and Roaming Exchanges (GRX). Discusses future research and proposed security standards in next generation systems. Prerequisite: EC3710 or EC3730.

EC4745 Mobile Ad-Hoc Wireless Networks (3-2) Spring

The course presents the fundamental principles, design issues, performance analysis, and military applications of infrastructure and ad hoc wireless packet switched networks. Radio wave propagation, wireless channel characteristic, orthogonal frequency division multiplexing, transceiver design, channel coding, and other physical layer technologies are reviewed. Principles of wireless local area and wide area (cellular) networks are presented. Design and performance analysis of medium access control mechanisms - contention, reservation and scheduling - are covered. Mobile IP protocol is presented, and reactive and proactive protocols for routing in ad hoc networks are introduced. The performance of TCP over wireless networks is analyzed. Security in infrastructure and ad hoc networks is addressed. Sensor networks are introduced. Energy management is discussed. The widely used and emerging wireless networking standards are reviewed. Hardware laboratory assignments provide hands-on experience and OPNET projects allow simulation of large scale networks to complement the theory presented in the course. Prerequisite: EC3710 or consent of instructor.

EC4750 Sigint Systems II (3-4) Winter

Detailed problems and principles of Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) are presented. Several SIGINT scenarios are studied in class, and students select one for a team project. The scenarios taught are based on SIGINT needs from the National Security Agency (the scenarios are highly classified). The selected SIGINT scenario will require a conceptual design or realignment of national SIGINT systems to satisfy the operational commander's SIGINT needs. Prerequisites: EC3750 or consent of instructor. Classification: U.S. citizenship and TOP SECRET clearance with eligibility for SCI access.

EC4755 Network Traffic, Activity Detection, and Tracking (3-2) Spring

Network traffic characterization, traffic engineering/management and detection and tracking of traffic anomalies are covered with a focus on statistical and information theoretic concepts, signal processing, and control theory. Network (cyber) traffic is characterized based on statistical and information theoretic approaches such as self similarity and information entropy. Traffic flows and traffic flow analysis are presented; multimedia nature of network traffic discussed. Traffic engineering techniques of congestion control, traffic redirection, and admission control are examined utilizing network flows and queue management and analysis. Detection theory is introduced. Detection of threat activity based on traffic anomalies is examined. Neyman-Peason criterion and the receiver operating characteristic are presented. Traffic flow analysis for activity tracking is discussed. Case studies of local area networks, the Internet, sensor networks, and wireless networks including the 4G systems are conducted. Laboratories will provide hands-on experience and introduce tools of traffic characterization, detection, monitoring, and tracing. Prerequisite: EC3730, EC3500.

EC4765 Cyber Warfare (TS/SCI) (3-2) Summer

Cyber warfare explored from an electrical engineering perspective. Historical examples of military cyber warfare operations are reviewed. Rudimentary denial-of-service techniques are initially discussed and progress to intelligent waveform-specific forms of computer network attack (CNA). The effect of communications signaling manipulation is analyzed in examples involving mobile wireless networks such as Global Systems Mobile (GSM), and the IEEE 802.11 and 802.16 standards. Extension of cyber warfare concepts to large scale systems is presented to include concepts in distributed denial of service attacks, distributed storage, distributed sensor coordination, and information exfiltration. Prerequisites: EC3760; Classification: U.S. citizenship and TOP SECRET clearance with eligibility for SCI access.

EC4770 Wireless Communications Network Security (3-2) Fall

Examines the impact of the radio frequency environment on the security of wireless communications networks. Specifically, considers access and availability issues related to jamming and associated countermeasures such as spread spectrum transmission. Investigates diversity applications such as Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) and Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM). Examines confidentiality assurance in the form of encryption and analyzes the impact of the RF environment on various cipher types such as stream and block ciphers. Discusses approaches to integrity assurance in the form of digital hashing, interleaving, and convolutional coding. Examines all of the above factors in the context of a variety of topologies to include personal area networks (PAN), local area networks (LAN), metropolitan area networks (MAN) and wide area networks (WAN). Provides a brief overview of encryption and digital signaling. Analyzes and compares protocol implementations such as Wired Equivalent Privacy (WEP), Wi-Fi Protected Access (WPA), the WiMax Cipher Block Chaining Message Authentication Code Protocol (CCMP) and the Mobile Application Part (MAP) of Signaling System No. 7 (SS7). Discuss general aspects of wireless communication vulnerabilities. Prerequisite: EC3710 or EC3730.

EC4775 Computer Network Hardware Security (3-2) Summer

This course initially reviews computer network hardware from the architectural, design, implementation, and manufacturing perspectives. The operational vulnerabilities of networking hardware are then presented. Techniques and methods for improving network hardware security, that are appropriate for both existing and future high-speed networks, are then discussed. Today’s cyber networks operate at multi-gigabit wire speeds and future networks are projected to operate at tera-bit speeds. Network security techniques which require packet processing and analysis at these high speeds will be examined, and special hardware implementations will be presented. Additional topics include critical high speed hardware for network security applications, encryption and decryption processors, and hardware intrusion detection schemes. Prerequisite: EC3730, EC3860.

EC4785 Internet Engineering (3-2) Winter

This course examines the optimal design and analysis of interconnected, heterogeneous computer networks, specifically those employed by the US Navy (e.g., IT-21). A common theme throughout will be the confluence of connection-oriented and connectionless data communications and their overarching networking methodologies. The course will focus primarily on the TCT/IP suite. Techniques for segmentation and reassembly, routing, transfer agent placement, error control, throughput analysis, broadcasting, and multicasting will be examined in detail. Performance of common distributed applications will be analyzed. Prerequisite: EC3710 or consent of the instructor.

EC4790 Cyber Architectures and Engineering (3-2) Fall

The course addresses the holistic design, analysis and integration of the three-tiered cyber architecture of the medium, network, and services. Interoperability and interconnection of heterogeneous networks are discussed. Service oriented architectures and service orchestration mechanisms to include such techniques as artificial intelligence, control theory, min-max algorithm and feedback analysis are introduced. Network centric services and system design for both wired and wireless platforms are emphasized. Tools such as WSDL and SoaML will be introduced. System availability calculations and quality of service issues at different levels of the system are discussed in-depth. Comprehensive approaches to security across all levels of the system-medium, network, and services-are analyzed. Development of network centric, distributed engineering applications will be considered for static as well as mobile services. Sensor networks, information fusion, and end-to-end services are studied. Prerequisite: EC3730 or EC3710.

EC4795 Wireless Device Security (3-1) Spring

This advanced course extends earlier study in communications devices and software defined radio to include security vulnerabilities and countermeasures from the perspective of the radio signal and the wireless device. Radio signal vulnerabilities include signal interception, rouge access points, wireless intrusion, client misassociation, unauthorized association, emitter geographical location, direction finding, RF energy detection, and emitter fingerprinting. Wireless device vulnerabilities include backdoor access, tempest, reverse engineering, cloning and tampering of static random access memory field programmable gate arrays, bus snooping, side channel attacks, covert channels, red/black separation, and aspects of software defined and cognitive radios. Prerequisites: EC3500, EC4530.

<EC Courses EC4800-EC5810>

EC4800 Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering (3-0) As Required

Advanced topics and current developments in computer architecture including such subjects as: graphics and multimedia processors relevant to military applications and workstations; computer structures for artificial intelligence and large data bases; supercomputers and massively parallel architectures; advanced logic design, hardware/software co-design, and multiple-valued logic. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

EC4810 Fault-Tolerant Computing (3-2) Summer

Introduction to fault-tolerant computing. The causes and effects of computer, digital system, and software failure. The fundamental concepts and techniques for the design and implementation of fault-tolerant computers, testing digital systems, and software. Modeling, simulation, and evaluation of fault-tolerant systems. Military and space applications of fault-tolerant computing. Prerequisites: EC3800 or EC3840.

EC4820 Advanced Computer Architecture (3-2) Fall

Techniques to achieve high-performance computing, including advanced architectural features and highly parallel processors. Techniques for improving processor, memory subsystem, and I/O subsystem performance, including pipelining, memory interleaving, multi-level caching, and parallel I/O. Parallel computer models, scalability, and clustering. Parallel programming, the role of the compiler, and compiler parallelization techniques. Performance metrics, evaluation, and comparisons between parallel processors. Enabling technologies for highly parallel computers, including the use of microprocessors and field-programmable gate arrays. Distributed memory. Processor/cluster interconnection networks. Advanced implementation technologies and techniques, including reconfigurable computing. Military applications of high-performance computers and parallel processors. Prerequisites: EC3800 or EC3820 or EC3830 or EC3840.

EC4830 Digital Computer Design (3-2) Spring

This course presents digital system design techniques that can be used in tactical embedded systems. It involves a study of the architecture of and the design process for digital computer systems. Topics covered include instruction set architectures, advanced computer arithmetic, hierarchical design techniques, and design of systems using standard and custom VLSI devices. Modern computer-aided design tools are emphasized. Laboratory project is the design of a digital computer. Prerequisites: EC3800 or EC3830.

EC4870 VLSI Systems Design (3-2) Winter

Introduction to the design and implementation of Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) and Bipolar CMOS (BiCMOS) Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) digital Integrated Circuits (ICs). Topics covered include the specification of the high-level functional design, the design, implementation, and simulation of low-level cells, floor planning and the assembly of low-level cells into the high-level design using hierarchical place-and-route techniques, circuit extraction and simulation for functional verification, timing analysis, and power estimation, and the principles of bulk CMOS, BiCMOS, and SOS/SOI IC fabrication. Applications of VLSI ICs in military systems are also covered. The course is centered around laboratory projects where student groups design, implement, simulate, and submit for fabrication, a full-custom CMOS, BiCMOS, VLSI IC. IC functionality is selected by each student group. A field trip to a commercial foundry and clean room tour is also included. Prerequisites: EC2200 and either EC3800 or EC3830 or EC3840.

EC4900 Topics for Individual Study in Electrical Engineering (V-V) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Supervised study in selected areas of Electrical Engineering to meet the needs of the individual student. A written report is required at the end of the quarter. Prerequisites: Consent of the department chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

EC4910, 20,...90 Advanced Special Topics In Electrical Engineering (V-V) Fall

Courses on advanced special topics in Electrical Engineering are offered under these numbers. In most cases, new courses are offered as special topics of current interest with the possibility of being developed as regular courses. See the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department's on-line catalog for current offerings.

EC5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

EO Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<EO Courses EO2402-EO4911>

EO2402 Introduction to Linear Systems (4-1) Summer

A course in the rudiments of linear systems for naval officers in non-electrical engineering curricula. Principles of discrete and continuous-time systems. Topics include difference equations, discrete and continuous convolution, correlation, transfer functions, and system diagrams. Transform applications in communication and control systems. Prerequisites: Ability to program in a higher level language.

EO2512 Introduction to Communications and Countermeasures (4-2) Spring

A first course in communications and countermeasures for the Information Warfare curriculum. The course considers basic electricity and electronics, noise analysis, amplitude modulation, frequency modulation, digital coding, and transmission. Prerequisites: MA3139.

EO2513 Introduction to Communication Systems Engineering (4-2) Winter

A first course in communications systems for the C4I curriculum. The course considers basic electricity and electronics, signals and systems, and amplitude modulation transmission and reception. Prerequisite: MO1901

EO2525 Probabilistic Analysis of Signals and Communications Systems (4-1) Spring

Basic analog and digital communications techniques are discussed. The foundations of signals and systems are developed from probabilistic and statistical approaches. Emphasis is on communication systems relevant to military applications. Topics include AM, FM, probability, random variables, probability density and distribution functions; deterministic versus nondeterministic signals; expectation, the dc and rms values of nondeterministic signals, correlation and covariance; LTI systems, transformation of random variables, and the central limit theorem. Prerequisites: MA2121 and PH1322

EO2652 Fields, Waves, and Electromagnetic Engineering (4-1) Winter

This course covers electromagnetic field theory and engineering applications. Static electric and magnetic field theory is developed and Maxwell's equations are presented. Applications include plane wave propagation, analysis and design of transmission lines, waveguides, resonators, and high frequency components. Labs provide practical experience with microwave instruments, components, and measurement techniques. The objective of the course is to provide a foundation for subsequent study of microwave engineering, antennas, scattering, and radio wave propagation for application in the areas of communications, radar, and electronic warfare. Prerequisites: MA1116 and PH1322, or consent of instructor.

EO3402 Signals and Noise (3-1) Fall

A course in the rudiments of modern signal processing for naval officers in non-electrical engineering curricula. Topics include signal processing in the frequency domain using the DFT and FFT, random signals, their description and processing. Applications to signal detection, demodulation, filtering, beam forming, target tracking, and other relevant naval and military operations. Prerequisites: EO2402 and OS2103 or equivalent.

EO3404 Applied Digital Signal Processing (3-2) As Required

This course introduces the fundamentals of Digital Signal Processing as applied to one dimensional acoustic signals. The course covers the fundamental theory of Signals and Systems, the application of the DFT (Discrete Fourier Transform) to problems in spectral estimation, digital filter design, detection of pulses by correlation and fundamentals of array processing. The laboratories are entirely based on processing of acoustic signals using Metlab. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor.

EO3502 Telecommunications Systems Technology (4-0) Winter/Summer

A broad-based course in telecommunications systems technology for a multidisciplinary audience. The course considers analog and digital communications systems. Specific topics include amplitude and angle modulation transmission and reception; baseband and passband digital modulation; system noise; transmission lines, waveguides and antennas; fiber optics; satellite communications. Prerequisites: MO1901.

EO3512 Telecommunications Engineering (4-1) Summer

The second course in communications and countermeasures for the Information Warfare curriculum. The course considers signals and protocols for networks, time and frequency domain multiplexing, transmission lines, antennas, and fiber optics, and cellular communication concepts. Prerequisites: EO2512.

EO3513 Communications Systems Engineering (4-2) Spring

The second course in communications systems engineering for the C4I curriculum. The course considers analog and digital communications systems. Specific topics include angle modulation transmission and reception; the sampling theorem; spectral representation of pulse and digital signals; pulse and digital modulations; baseband coding forms; frequency and time division multiplexing; transmission lines, waveguides and antennas. Prerequisites: EO2513.

EO3516 Introduction to Communication Systems Engineering (4-2) Spring

A first course in communication systems for the Space Systems Operations curriculum. The course considers basic electricity and electronics, signals and systems, and amplitude modulation transmission and reception. Prerequisites: None.

EO3525 Communications Engineering (4-1) Summer

The influence of noise and interference on the design and selection of digital  communications systems is analyzed.  Topics include link budget analysis and signal-to-noise ratio calculations, receiver performance for various digital modulation techniques, bandwidth and signal power trade-offs, an introduction to spread spectrum communications, and multiple access techniques.  Examples of military communications systems are included.  Prerequisites: EO2525.

EO3602 Electromagnetic Radiation, Scattering and Propagation (4-2) Spring

The principles of electromagnetic radiation are applied to antenna engineering, scattering, and propagation. The characteristics of various practical antenna types are considered including arrays and reflectors. Scattering concepts are introduced and propagation phenomena are considered. Applications include sidelobe suppression, radar target scattering and stealth approaches, HF and satellite communications. This course is intended for students not in the 590 curriculum. Prerequisites: EO2652 or equivalent.

EO3730 Cyber Communications Architectures (same as CY3300) (4-0) As Required

The purpose of this course is to develop literacy and familiarity with Navy, DoD, and allied enterprise information systems and emerging technology trends. It presents basic concepts in conventional and military telephony and telecommunication networks; examines DoN implementations from intra-ship, ship-to-ship and long haul; and discusses architectures and components of the GIG including both classified and unclassified networks. It discusses interoperability of diverse network architectures and the impact of mobile platforms on operations. Prerequisites: CY3100, CY3110 and CS3030, SECRET.

EO3911 Interdisciplinary Studies in Electrical and Computer Engineering (V-V) Fall

Courses on special topics of joint interest to electrical and computer engineering and other areas are offered under these numbers. In most cases new courses are offered as special topics of current interest with the possibility of being developed as regular courses. See the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department's on-line catalog for current offerings.

<EO Courses EO2402-EO4911>

EO4409 Engineering Acoustics Capstone Project (2-4) Summer

Same as PH4409. See PH4409 for course description and prerequisites.

EO4512 Communications and Countermeasures (3-2) Fall

The final course in communications and countermeasures for the Information Warfare curriculum. The course develops encryption and decryption concepts, secure communications, and communications countermeasures. Prerequisites: EO3512. Classification: U.S. citizenship and SECRET clearance.

EO4513 Communications Systems Analysis (4-2) Summer

The final course in communications systems engineering for the C4I curriculum. The course considers propagation effects on signal transmission; end-to-end path calculations for wire/coax, optical fiber, and RF systems including terrestrial ground links and satellite communications; spread spectrum; wireless/cellular communications. Prerequisites: EO3513.

EO4516 Communications Systems Analysis (4-2) Summer

The final course in communications systems engineering for the Space Systems Operations curriculum. The course considers propagation effects on signal transmission; end-to-end path calculations for wire/coax, optical fiber, and RF systems including terrestrial ground links and satellite communications; spread spectrum; wireless/cellular communications. Prerequisites: EO3516.

EO4612 Microwave Devices and Radar (4-2) Summer

Those microwave devices most important in radar and in electronic warfare systems are studied, including magnetrons, traveling-wave tubes, and solid-state diodes. The radar range equation is developed. In addition to basic pulse radar, modern techniques are discussed including Doppler systems, tracking radar, pulse compression, and electronically steerable array radars. Electromagnetic compatibility problems involving radar systems from which the advanced techniques have developed, with performance measurement methods, automatic tracking systems, pulse compression, and the measurement of radar cross-section of targets. Prerequisites: EO3602 (may be concurrent) or consent of instructor.

EO4911 Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies in Electrical and Computer Engineering (V-V) Fall

Courses on advanced special topics of joint interest to electrical and computer engineering and other areas are offered under these numbers. In most cases, new courses are offered as special topics of current interest with the possibility of being developed as regular courses. See the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department's on-line catalog for current offerings Prerequisites: None.

Electronic Systems Engineering - Curriculum 590

Website

http://www.nps.edu/Academics/GSEAS/ECE/index.html

Program Officer

LCDR Thor Martinsen

Code EC/MA, Spanagel Hall, Room 401A

(831)656-2678, DSN 756-2859

Fax (831)656-2760 (ECE) and (831)656-2355 (MA)

tmartins@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cr, Spanagel Hall, Room 452

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum is designed to educate officers in current electronics technology and its application to modern naval warfare. It establishes a broad background of basic engineering knowledge, leading to selected advanced studies in electronic systems, ship/weapon control systems, and communication/information processing applicability. It will enhance individual performance in all duties throughout a naval career, including operational billets, technical management assignments, and policy making positions, thereby preparing Naval officers for progressively increasing responsibility, including command, both ashore and afloat. U. S. Naval officer students are required to complete the requirements for the MSEE degree as well as certain additional requirements specified by the program sponsor for award of a Navy P-code. Other students are not required to satisfy these additional requirements.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree in engineering or the physical sciences is desired. Differential and integral calculus, one year of calculus-based college physics and at least one semester of college chemistry are required. The Engineering Science Program within the ESE curriculum is available for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements. The time required will vary with the candidate's background. Prior to undertaking the program, or as a part of the program, each officer will earn/have earned the equivalent of an accredited BSEE. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry.

Entry Date

Electronic Systems Engineering is typically an eight-quarter course of study with entry dates in every quarter. A six-quarter program is available for officers with an ABET EAC accredited BSEE degree on a case-by-case basis. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering degree are met en route to satisfying the educational skill requirements.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Engineering Electronics Subspecialist with a subspecialty code 53XXP. A limited number of particularly well-qualified students may be able to further their education beyond the master's degree and obtain the Degree of Electrical Engineer and a 53XXN subspecialty code. The curriculum sponsor is the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Instructor: Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD

Project Manager: SPAWARSYSCOM; NAVSEASYSCOM; NIWA

Operations Test and Evaluation: COMOPTEVFOR

Electronics Research Manager: NSA/CSS, FT. Meade

C3 Staff Officer: DISA HQ, Washington, DC

Project Officer: Warfare Systems Architecture and Engineering, SPAWARHDQTRS

Electrical Engineer: USSTRATCOM

Typical Course of Study:
Computer Systems Option

Quarter 1

EC2100

(4-2)

Circuit Analysis

EC2820

(3-2)

Digital Logic Circuits

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-Variable Calculus

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy

Quarter 2

EC2110

(3-2)

Circuit Analysis II

EC2200

(3-1)

Introduction to Electronic Engineering

EC2400

(3-3)

Discrete Systems

EC2840

(3-2)

Introduction to Microprocessors

Quarter 3

CS2971

(4-2)

Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming with C++

EC2300

(3-2)

Control Systems

EC2410

(3-1)

Analysis of Signals and Systems

EC3800

(3-2)

Microprocessor Based System Design

EC3000

(1-0)

Introduction to Graduate Research

Quarter 4

ECXXXX

 

BSEE Elective I

EC3830

(3-2)

Digital Computer Methodology

EC3500

(4-0)

Analysis of Random Signals

EC2320

(3-1)

Linear Systems

EC3000

(1-0)

Introduction to Graduate Research

Quarter 5

ECXXXX

 

BSEE Elective II

EC2220

(3-4)

Applied Electronics

EC3820

(3-1)

Computer Systems

ECXXXX

 

BSEE Elective III

Quarter 6

EC4010

(3-2)

Principles of Systems Engineering

EC4830

(3-2)

Digital Computer Design

EC3830

(3-2)

Digital Computer Design Methodology

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 7

ECXXXX

 

MSEE Elective I

EC3850

(3-1)

Computer Communications Methods

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 8

ECXXXX

 

MSEE Elective II

EC4800

(3-0)

Advanced Topics in Computer Engineering

EC4870

(3-2)

VLSI Systems Design

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

The Communications Systems option is designed to provide an advanced education in modern communication engineering topics such as digital communications, spread spectrum communication including anti-jam and low probability of intercept applications, forward error correction coding, wireless networks, and satellite communications.

The Computer Systems option is designed to provide an advanced education in the design, implementation, and application of military computer systems, including such topics as logic circuits, logic design and synthesis, microprocessors, computer and digital systems architecture, military computer architectures, fault tolerant computing, high-speed networking, silicon VLSI and gallium arsenide digital IC design, parallel processing, and the hardware/software interface.

The Guidance, Control, and Navigation Systems option is designed to provide an advanced education in the modeling and simulation advanced dynamic systems, the current state of knowledge regarding state estimation (linear and nonlinear filtering), system identification, and the control of dynamic systems, and to unite the theory with military applications. Courses in specific areas of military application include military robotics, missile guidance and control, and integrated target tracking.

The Solid State Microelectronics and Power Systems option is designed to provide advanced education in the analysis, design, simulation and control of power electronic and electromechanical components and integrated topologies common to existing and proposed military systems.

The Signal Processing Systems option is designed to provide advanced education in algorithms and design of systems for analysis and processing of signals and images encountered in communications, control, surveillance, radar, sonar and underwater acoustics.

The Sensor Systems Engineering option is designed to provide the educational curriculum and thesis research opportunities in a wide range of sensor systems utilized by Navy, DoD and other national agencies.  Research efforts cover a wide range of topics dealing with sensor related problems -- from basic research in electromagnetic scattering, propagation and compatibility, or underwater acoustic propagation, to applications to electronic warfare and sonar systems, sensor networks, submarine EM signatures and shielding, weather processing for tactical military radars, digital/optical receivers, low probability of intercept (LPI) emitters and digital phased arrays for sensors and communication systems.

The Network Engineering option offers advanced education in design, implementation and analysis of modern communication networks. Courses cover the infrastructure of network-centric military communication systems to include wireless, mobile ad-hoc and sensor networks, high-speed networks, large-scale network deployment, intrusion prevention systems and architectures for multimedia distribution. Hands-on experimentation and implementation is provided using state-of-the-art networking equipment consisting of optical switches, routers, wireless access points, advanced sensor motes, traffic generators, channel simulators, protocol analyzers, high-resolution vector spectrum analyzers, wireless signal generators, multimedia encoder/decoder transmission systems, and simulation software.

Educational Skills Requirements (ESR)
Electronic Systems Engineering - Curriculum 590
Subspecialty Codes: 5300P-5311P

  1. Mathematics: The officer will have a thorough knowledge of mathematical tools, which are intrinsic to electrical and computer systems engineering, including but not limited to differential equations, vector analysis, linear algebra, probability, and Fourier and Laplace methods.
  2. Engineering Science and Design: To acquire the requisite background needed to meet the other military education requirements, the officer will acquire proficiency in modern physics, electromagnetic, electronic devices and circuits, system theory, modern electronic system design, and integrated electrical power systems and their controls. In addition, proficiency will be gained in other appropriate fields, such as underwater acoustics, dynamics, fluid mechanics or thermo-dynamics, that provide the requisite breadth to a military engineering education.
  3. Cyber Networks and Physical Infrastructures: The officer will have a sound understanding of cyber infrastructure systems and technologies of interest to the military. Knowledge will include but not be limited to cover copper and fiber media networks, telecommunication networks and signaling, the Internet and enterprise networks, wireless and cellular networks, and spaced based networks. Additionally, officers will gain an understanding of control and overlay networks such as Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems and the National power grid. In addition, the officer will have introductory knowledge of computer hardware and their integration into military systems.
  4. Electronic and Electrical Engineering: In order to provide officers skilled in the application of electronic systems to military needs, the officer will have competence in the broad area of electrical engineering including circuits, electronics, computer and communications networks, and systems engineering. The officer will select elective courses to obtain breadth in his/her understanding of military electronic systems. To achieve depth of understanding, the officer shall specialize in one of the following areas: (a) Communication Systems (including electronic counter-counter measures, low probability of intercept systems, low probability of detection systems, and other military issues) (b) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Systems (c) Microelectronics and Power Systems (d) Signal Processing Systems (as applied to surveillance, underwater acoustic data acquisition and processing, imaging and target location, and other military issues) (e) Computer Systems (including advanced integrated circuits, networking and data communications, parallel and distributed systems, reliable real time military platforms) (f) Sensors (including radar, electro-optical, electronic and information warfare systems) (g) Network Engineering (including wireless networks, sensor networks, high speed data networking, and telecommunication systems) (h) Cyber Systems (including a rigorous treatment of the cyber network and physical infrastructure, cyber system vulnerabilities and risk assessment, telecommunications systems engineering, trustworthy hardware, and Internet engineering).
  5. System Engineering: The officer will have a sound understanding of engineering principles utilized in the systems engineering process, particularly as they relate to military systems, including establishment of system related operational requirements and criteria.
  6. Conducting and Reporting Independent Investigation: The officer will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent investigation of a Navy and/or DoD relevant electronic systems problem, to resolve the problem, and to present the results of the analysis in both written and oral form.

Electronic Systems Engineering (DL) - Curriculum 592

ECE DL Business Manager

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cx, Spanagel Hall

Room 462

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

ECE Associate Chair for Students

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall

Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Electrical and Computer Engineering Department Distance learning programs are tailored to customer requirements and may lead to one of several master's degrees. Options include the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering (MSEE), the Master of Science in Engineering Science with a major in electrical engineering (MSES(EE)) and the Master of Engineering (MEng). Courses are delivered on a schedule determined in consultation with the customer, with one course per quarter being typical (four courses per year). A typical program can be completed in two to three years. MS degree programs are research-based and require submission and approval of a written thesis. The MEng degree is course-based and may require a capstone project. A 3.0 GQPR in course work is required for award of a master's degree. Non-resident students enrolled in ECE Department certificate programs may, upon completion of the certificate program(s), transfer from the certificate curriculum to the 592 curriculum and apply certificate program courses toward requirements for a master's degree.

Research or Capstone Project

Course work is followed by research and submission of a written thesis in MSEE and MSES(EE) degree programs. The MSEE Degree Program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET and requires that students have a baccalaureate degree from an ABET EAC accredited engineering program or establish equivalency. The ECE Department can provide transition education for the purpose of establishing equivalency, but additional course work is required. The MSES(EE) Degree Program is also research-based but is not accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. It is intended for students who have not satisfied ABET EAC undergraduate program criteria but by their academic preparation and on-the-job experience can successfully complete graduate courses in a chosen area of electrical engineering. Theses must be submitted and approved within a three year period following the completion of course work in research-based degree programs.

The MEng degree program is course-based, and the degree may be awarded solely on the basis of course work. MEng programs may include a capstone project if a customer wants one. The total time required to complete a degree program ranges from four to seven years, depending on the courses selected.

DL Program Delivery Mode

To maintain quality, it is ECE Department policy to enroll non-resident students in courses offered synchronously to resident students. Courses are delivered to the remote site via video tele-education (VTE) using two-way audio and video. Lectures are recorded and streaming video is made available to accommodate those DL students whose attendance at the remote site is interrupted by job-related travel. Course materials are provided online using SAKAI (http://www.nps.edu/Technology/CLE/). Student mentoring sessions will be scheduled by each instructor and conducted via e-mail or phone. Courses can also be delivered synchronously using Blackboard Collaborate (www.blackboard.com).

Requirements for Entry

An APC score of 323.

Acceptance by the ECE Department: Entrance to the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum at Naval Postgraduate School is through a three-part requirement consisting of a minimum grade point average at the undergraduate level, a sufficient mathematics background, and a sufficient background in technical undergraduate studies. Applicants with a B.S.E.E. degree usually will satisfy the last two requirements automatically.

Command/Company endorsement.

Entry Dates

At the beginning of any quarter in the academic year.

Degree

MSEE, MSES(EE) or MEng.

Subspecialty

This program does not lead to a subspecialty code.

Typical course of study (MEng with specialization in EW):

Employment years 1-2

EC3600

(3-2)

Antennas and Propagation

EC3630

(3-2)

Radiowave Propagation

EC3700

(3-2)

Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare

Employment years 3-4

EC3210

(3-2)

Introduction to Electro-Optical Engineering

EC3610

(3-2)

Microwave Engineering

EC4610

(3-2)

Radar Systems

Employment years 5-6

EC4630

(3-2)

Radar Cross Section Prediction and Reduction

EC4640

(3-2)

Airborne Radar Systems

EC4680

(3-2)

- Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare II

Employment year 7

EC0820

(0-8)

Capstone Project in Electrical Engineering

EC0830

(0-8)

 

Capstone Project in Electrical Engineering

EC4900

 

Topics for Individual Study in Electrical Engineering

Electrical Systems Engineering (Energy) - Curriculum 593

Program Officer

LCDR Thor Martinsen

Code EC/MA, Spanagel Hall, Room 401A

(831)656-2678, DSN 756-2859

Fax (831)656-2760 (ECE) and (831)656-2355 (MA)

tmartins@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum is designed to educate officers in current electronics and power systems technology and its application to modern naval warfare, particularly as it applies to energy consumption and production. It establishes a broad background of basic engineering knowledge, leading to selected advanced studies in electronic systems and ship power control systems. It will enhance individual performance in all duties throughout a naval career, including operational billets, technical management assignments, and policy making positions, thereby preparing Naval officers for progressively increasing responsibility, including command, both ashore and afloat. U. S. Naval officer students are required to complete the requirements for the MSEE degree as well as certain additional requirements specified by the program sponsor for award of a Navy P-code. Other

students are not required to satisfy these additional requirements.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree in electrical engineering or closely related field is required. Differential and integral calculus, one year of calculus-based college physics are required.

The Engineering Science Program within the ESE curriculum is available for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements. The time required will vary with the candidate's background. Prior to undertaking the program, or as a part of the program, each officer will earn/have earned the equivalent of an accredited BSEE. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry.

Entry Date

Electronic Systems Engineering – Energy Specialty is typically an eight-quarter course of study with entry dates in the fall quarter. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer.

Degree Requirements

Degree Requirements for the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering degree are met en route to satisfying the educational skill requirements. Subspecialty Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Engineering Electronics Subspecialist with a subspecialty code 5311P. The curriculum sponsors are the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command and the Navy Energy Coordination Office.

Course Matrix

Quarter One:

MA1113

4-0

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

4-0

Single Variable Calculus II with Matrix Algebra

AE2440

3-2

Introduction to Digital Computation

EC2500

3-2

Communications Systems

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Two:

PH3998

(V-0)

Special Topics in Intermediate Physics

EC2100

(3-2)

Circuit Analysis

EC2300

(3-2)

Control Systems

 

(V-V)

JPME

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Three:

EC3730

(3-2)

Cyber Network and Physical Infrastructures

EC2110

(3-2)

Circuit Analysis II

EC4010

(3-2)

Principles of Systems Engineering

 

(V-V)

JPME

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Four:

EC3150

(3-2)

Solid State Power Conversion

EC2200

(3-3)

Introduction to Electronics Engineering

EC3xxx

 

TBD

 

(V-V)

JPME

N3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Five:

EC4150

(4-1)

Advanced Solid State Power Conversion

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

EC3220

(3-2)

Semiconductor Device Technologies

 

(V-V)

JPME

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Six:

EC3130

(4-2)

Electrical Machinery Theory

EC4230

(3-1)

Reliability Issues for Military Electronics

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

EC49xx

 

TBD

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Seven:

EC4130

(4-2)

Advanced Electrical Machinery Systems

EC2000

 

TBD

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

EC3xxx

 

TBD

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter Eight:

EC4950

(V-V)

Advanced Special Topics in Electrical Engineering

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

EC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OS3007

(4-0)

Operations Research for Energy Systems Analysts

EN3000

2-0

Defense Energy Seminar

Total Ship Systems Engineering (Under Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering)

Program Director

Fotis A. Papoulias, Ph.D.

Code ME/PA, Watkins Hall, Room 323

(831) 656-3381, DSN 756-3381

papoulias@nps.edu

Total Ship Systems Engineering

The objective of this program is to provide a broad-based, design oriented education focusing on the warship as a total engineering system including hull, mechanical, electrical and combat systems. The program is for selected Naval Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering students and is structured to lead to the MSME, MSEE, or MS in Physics. Entry to the Total Ship Systems Engineering program is through the standard 533/570/590/591 curricula.

Entry Date

Total Ship Systems Engineering will generally fit as part of an eight or nine-quarter program, with TSSE elective commencing in October. The ease of accommodating TSSE in a student's program is influenced by the student's NPS entry quarter and undergraduate background and performance. Individuals interested in the program should explore the necessary course sequencing with the program officer or academic associate as early as possible.

Subspecialty

Completion of this program will contribute toward the graduate's subspecialty code within his/her designated curriculum. The student will also receive 5602P subspecialty code for completion of the TSSE Program.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Upon award of the subspecialty code, the officer would be eligible for assignments typical of the P-Code. The expectation is that the combination of education and experience would lead to individuals qualified for assignment later in their career to more responsible positions in systems design and acquisition in NAVSEA, SPAWAR and OPNAV, and as Program Managers.

Cyber Warfare Certificate - Curriculum 288

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall

Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Cyber Warfare Certificate addresses the network threat environment, network infrastructure, network design and security for both wired and wireless environments as well as all facets of computer network operations, depending on the choice of certificate electives. The coursework equips students with an ability to apply techniques for network operations with both wired and wireless computer networks based on an ability to analyze, design and evaluate networks. Electives can be chosen to satisfy requirements for workforce education in both the DoD and Intelligence Community. Non-DoD sectors of government and the private sector which traditionally focus on network defense may also wish to consider this certificate to provide their employees with a more insightful understanding of computer and network defense challenges.

A minimum of 12 credit hours must be completed.

Requirements for Entry

Entry Dates

Any Quarter

Program Length

9 months

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within three years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses: Curriculum 288

EC3760

Information Operations Systems (TS/SCI)

EC4765

Cyber Warfare

 

Approved

 

Elective(s):

DA3105

Conflict and Cyberspace

EC3730

Cyber Network and Physical Infrastructures

EC3750

Introduction to SIGINT Engineering

EC3970

Special Topics in Electrical & Computer Engineering

EC4730

Covert Communications

CS4558

Network Traffic Analysis

EC4755

Network Traffic, Activity Detection, and Tracking

Signal Processing Certificate - Curriculum 290

Academic Associate & Technical Point of Contact

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall

Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Provides students an understanding of digital signal processing fundamentals, principles, and applications at the advanced level. The certificate provides a solid engineering foundation which covers the fundamental concepts needed to analyze and process digital information in many current applications including video, imaging, audio, communications, networking, underwater, and control applications. This program provides a mixture of instruction and computer-based laboratory exercises that offer students the opportunity to explore concepts and investigate applications in signal processing.

The four course sequence is extracted from the current set of graduate courses required to complete the Signal Processing Systems specialization track offered by the ECE Department.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate varies between 15 and 16 depending on the elective choice. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program (Curriculum 592).

Requirements for Entry

An APC score of 323.

Acceptance by the ECE Department: Entrance to the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum at NPS is through a three-part requirement consisting of a minimum grade point average at the undergraduate level, a sufficient mathematics background, and a sufficient background in technical undergraduate studies. Applicants with a B.S.E.E. degree usually will satisfy the last two requirements automatically.

Command/Company endorsement.

Entry Date

At the beginning of Summer or Winter quarters (July or January).

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within three years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses

The certificate consists of the following three courses:

EC3400

(3-1)

Digital Signal Processing

EC3410

(3-2)

Discrete-Time Random Signals

EC4440

(3-2)

Statistical Digital Signal Processing

and one of the following list of Signal Processing courses. The current list, as of March 2014, includes:

EC3460

(3-2)

Intro to Machine Learning for Signal Analytics

EC3940

(V-V)

Special Topics in Electrical Engineering (Signal Processing)

EC4400

(V-V)

Advanced Topics in Signal Processing

EC4430

(3-2)

Multimedia Information and Communications

EC4450

(4-1)

Sonar Systems Engineering

EC4480

(3-2)

Image Processing and Recognition

EC4910

(3-1)

DSP for Wireless Applications

Electric Ships and Power Systems Certificate - Curriculum 291

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall

Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Technical Point of Contact

Alexander Julian, Ph.D.

Code EC/Jl

Spanagel Hall

Room 448A

(831) 656-2101, DSN 756-2101

ajulian@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Electric Ship Power Systems graduate certificate program provides a solid engineering foundation which covers the fundamental concepts in electrical power conversion and electromechanical power conversion at the advanced level. This coherent program is obtained by taking a 4-graduate-course sequence which provides a mixture of instruction and computer-based laboratories offering students the opportunity to study the behavior and performance power systems in a virtual environment.

The 4-graduate-course sequence is extracted from the current set of graduate courses required to complete the Solid State Microelectronics and Power Systems specialization track to the MSEE Degree offered by the ECE department.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 18.5.

Requirements for Entry

Entry Dates

At the beginning of any quarter in the academic year (Oct, Jan, Apr, Jul)

Program Length

Four quarters

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within 3 years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses: Curriculum 291

EC3130

Electrical Machine Theory

EC4130

Advanced Electrical Machinery Systems

EC3150

Solid State Power Conversion

EC4150

Advanced Solid State Power Conversion

Electronic Warfare Engineer Academic Certificate - Curriculum 292

Academic Associate & Technical Point of Contact

David C. Jenn, Ph.D.

Code EC/Jn, Spanagel Hall, Room 414

(831) 656-2254, DSN 756-2254

jenn@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Provides students an understanding of the technical foundations found in electronic warfare at the system level and examines the impact of the physical environment. The certificate provides a solid engineering foundation which covers the fundamental concepts needed to understand how EW signals are affected by the environment and includes a survey of existing EW systems and analysis techniques. This program provides a mixture of instruction and computer-based laboratory exercises which offer students the opportunity to explore concepts and investigate applications in the electronic warfare area.

The three-course sequence is extracted from the current set of graduate courses required to complete the Sensor Systems Engineering specialization track offered by the ECE Department.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 12.0. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program (Curriculum 592).

Requirements for Entry

An APC score of 323.

Acceptance by the ECE Department: Entrance to the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum at Naval Postgraduate School is through a three-part requirement consisting of a minimum grade point average at the undergraduate level, a sufficient mathematics background, and a sufficient background in technical undergraduate studies. Applicants with a B.S.E.E. degree usually will satisfy the last two requirements automatically.

Command/Company endorsement.

Entry Date

At the beginning of any quarter in the academic year.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within three years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses

EC3600

Antennas and Propagation

EC3630

Radiowave Propagation

EC3700

Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare I

Journeyman EW Engineer Academic Certificate Program - Curriculum 293

Academic Associate & Technical Point of Contact

David C. Jenn, Ph.D.

Code EC/Jn, Spanagel Hall, Room 414

(831) 656-2254, DSN 756-2254

jenn@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Provides students an understanding of the microwave and optical aspects of sensor and electronic warfare systems. State-of-the-art material on microwave and optical devices and their use in systems are discussed during the courses. The certificate material also includes a description of the operation of devices and trade-offs involved in component selection. This program provides a mixture of instruction and computer-based laboratory exercises that offer students the opportunity to explore concepts and investigate applications in the electronic warfare area.

The three-course sequence is extracted from the current set of graduate courses required to complete the Sensor Systems Engineering specialization track offered by the ECE Department.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 12.0. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program (Curriculum 592).

Requirements for Entry

An APC score of 323.

Acceptance by the ECE Department: Entrance to the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School is through a three-part requirement consisting of a minimum grade point average at the undergraduate level, a sufficient mathematics background, and a sufficient background in technical undergraduate studies. Applicants with a B.S.E.E. degree usually will satisfy the last two requirements automatically.

Command/Company endorsement.

Entry Date

At the beginning of Fall or Spring quarter.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within three years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses

EC3210

Introduction to Electro-Optical Engineering

EC3610

Microwave Engineering

EC4610

Radar Systems

Senior EW Engineer Academic Certificate Program - Curriculum 294

Academic Associate & Technical Point of Contact

David C. Jenn, Ph.D.

Code EC/Jn, Spanagel Hall, Room 414

(831) 656-2254, DSN 756-2254

jenn@nps.edu

Brief Overview

Provides students an understanding of advanced topics commonly found in EW. Among them are signature control (stealth) and low probability of intercept techniques for radar and electronic warfare. This program provides a mixture of instruction and computer-based laboratory exercises that offer students the opportunity to explore concepts and investigate applications in the electronic warfare area.

The three-course sequence is extracted from the current set of graduate courses required to complete the Sensor Systems Engineering specialization track offered by the ECE Department.

The total number of NPS graduate credits obtained for the certificate is 12.0. This certificate program can also be applied toward a master's degree program (Curriculum 592).

Requirements for Entry

An APC score of 323.

Acceptance by the ECE Department: Entrance to the Electrical and Computer Engineering curriculum at the Naval Postgraduate School is through a three-part requirement consisting of a minimum grade point average at the undergraduate level, a sufficient mathematics background, and a sufficient background in technical undergraduate studies. Applicants with a B.S.E.E. degree usually will satisfy the last two requirements automatically.

Command/Company endorsement.

Entry Date

At the beginning of Fall or Spring quarter in the academic year.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

The academic certificate program must be completed within three years of admission to the program. A student must maintain a 3.0 GQPR in the certificate courses to be awarded a certificate.

Required Courses

EC4630

Radar Cross Section Prediction and Reduction

EC4640

Airborne Radar Systems

EC4680/ or

EC4690 (DL)

Joint Network Enabled Electronic Warfare II

Other Academic Certificates

Several additional graduate certificate programs have been approved and will be described in detail in future NPS catalogs:

Prospective students should request additional information on these certificate programs which are currently available for enrollment.

Network Engineering Certificate - Curriculum 295

Academic Associate

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cx, Spanagel Hall

Room 462

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

Program Manager

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cx, Spanagel Hall

Room 462

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Network Engineering Certificate is comprised of three or four courses (EC3710, EC4745 and one or two elective courses). Upon completion of this certificate program, students will be awarded a certificate of completion from the Naval Postgraduate School. The Network Engineering Certificate addresses the design, implementation, traffic, signaling and performance analysis of modern enterprise and telecommunications network infrastructures integrating both wired and wireless media..

Requirements for Entry

For entry, the student must have a baccalaureate degree. An academic profile code (APC) of 323 is required.

Entry Date

Spring or Fall

Program Length

Four Quarters

Required Courses

EC3710

(3-2)

Computer Communications Methods

EC4745

(3-2)

Mobile Ad Hoc Wireless Networking

And one or two of the following electives to total a minimum of 12 credit hours:

 

EC4725

(3-2)

Advanced Telecommunication Systems Engineering

EC4785

(3-1)

Internet Engineering

EC4710

(3-2)

High Speed Networking

EC4430

(3-1)

Multimedia Information and Communications

Cyber Systems Certificate - Curriculum 296

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Program Manager

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cx, Spanagel Hall

Room 462

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This certificate is designed to provide students with a graduate level focus on cyber systems, system reverse engineering, and depending on elective choice, an ability to assess vulnerability and risk, architecture and engineering, or network traffic.

Requirements for Entry

Students who plan to enroll in the Cyber Systems Certificate Program should have a BSEE degree or a degree in another area of science or engineering with additional coursework and on-the-job experience, including a basic communications course, that will allow them to successfully complete the certificate courses. An APC of 323 is required for entry.

Entry Date

Fall

Program Length

9-12 months

Required Courses

EC3730

(3-2)

Cyber Network and Physical Infrastructures

EC3740

(3-2)

Principles of Reverse Engineering of Electronic Systems

And one or two of the following electives to total a minimum of 12 credit hours:

 

EC4715

(3-2)

Cyber Systems Vulnerability and Risk Assessment

EC4790

(3-2)

Cyber Architectures and Engineering

EC4755

(3-2)

Network Traffic, Activity Detection and Tracking

Wireless Network Security Certificate - Curriculum 297

Academic Associate

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Program Manager

Roberto Cristi, Ph.D.

Code EC/Cx, Spanagel Hall

Room 462

(831) 656-2223, DSN 756-2223

rcristi@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This certificate is designed to provide students with a graduate level focus on the security of wireless communications networks, and depending on elective choice, an ability to assess the security of wireless devices or telecommunications systems, to maintain situational awareness on wireless networks or assess the risk of covert malicious functionality in system hardware components.

Requirements for Entry

Students who plan to enroll in the Wireless Network Security Certificate Program should have a BSEE degree or a degree in another area of science or engineering with additional coursework and on-the-job experience, including a basic communications course, that will allow them to successfully complete the certificate courses. An APC of 323 is required for entry.

Entry Date

Fall

Program Length

9-12 months

Required Courses

EC4770

(3-2)

Wireless Communications Network Security

EC4745

(3-2)

Mobile Ad Hoc Wireless Networking

And one or two of the following electives to total a minimum of 12 credit hours:

 

EC3860

(3-2)

Trustworthy Computer Hardware Analysis and Design

EC4735

(3-2)

Telecommunications Systems Security

EC4755

(3-2)

Network Traffic, Activity Detection and Tracking

EC4795

(3-2)

Wireless Device Security

Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee

Chair

Daphne Kapolka, Ph.D.

Code PH Spanagel Hall, Room 200A

(831) 656-1825, DSN 756-1825

dkapolka@nps.edu

Steven R. Baker*, Associate Professor, Department of Physics (1985); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1985.

Roberto Cristi*, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (1985); Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1983.

Monique P. Fargues*, Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (1989); Ph.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, 1988.

Daphne Kapolka*, Senior Lecturer, Department of Physics (2000); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Kevin B. Smith*, Professor, Department of Physics (1995); Ph.D., University of Miami, 1991.

(* indicates faculty member has a joint appointment to another department at NPS)

Brief Overview

The academic character of the programs in Engineering Acoustics is interdisciplinary, with courses and laboratory work drawn principally from the fields of physics and electrical engineering. Although broadly based, the emphasis of the programs is on those aspects of acoustics and signal processing applied to undersea warfare. Subjects covered include the generation, propagation and reception of sound in the ocean; military applications of underwater sound; and acoustic signal processing. These programs are designed specifically for students in the Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering, Undersea Warfare, and Underwater Acoustic Systems curricula, government employees in acoustics-related laboratories and systems commands, and international students.

Degrees

Master of Science in Engineering Acoustics

A candidate for the Master of Science in Engineering Acoustics degree must satisfactorily complete a program of study approved by the Chair, Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee, that includes:

  1. a minimum of 32 graduate credit quarter-hours of course work of which at least 20 must be taken in acoustics and its applications.
  2. at least three 4000 level courses from any three of the following six areas: wave propagation; transducer theory and design; noise, shock, and vibration control; sonar systems; signal processing; and communications. These courses must include at least one from each of the sponsoring disciplines (physics and electrical engineering).
  3. an acceptable thesis advised or co-advised by a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering or Physics Departments.

Approval of each program by the Chair of the Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee must be obtained prior to reaching the mid-point of the degree program.

Master of Engineering Acoustics

A candidate for the Master of Engineering Acoustics degree must satisfactorily complete a program of study approved by the Chair, Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee, that includes:

  1. a minimum of 32 graduate credit quarter-hours of course work of which at least 20 must be taken in acoustics and its applications.
  2. at least three 4000 level courses from any three of the following six areas: wave propagation; transducer theory and design; noise, shock, and vibration control; sonar systems; signal processing; and communications. These courses must include at least one from each of the sponsoring disciplines (physics and electrical engineering).
  3. an acceptable one-quarter capstone project advised by a member of the Electrical and Computer Engineering or Physics Departments.

Approval of each program by the Chair of the Engineering Acoustics Academic Committee must be obtained prior to reaching the mid-point of the degree program.

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Physics jointly sponsor an interdisciplinary program in Engineering Acoustics leading to either the Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Engineering degree. Areas of special strength in the departments are physical acoustics, underwater acoustics, acoustic signal processing, and acoustic communications. A noteworthy feature of this program is that a portion of the student's research may be conducted away from the Naval Postgraduate School at a cooperating laboratory or other federal government installation. The degree requirements and examinations are as outlined under the general school requirements for the doctorate degree. In addition to the school requirements, the departments require a preliminary examination to show evidence of acceptability as a doctoral student.

Underwater Acoustic Systems - Curriculum 535

Chair, EAAC

Daphne Kapolka, Ph.D.

Code PH/Kd, Spanagel Hall, Room 202

(831) 656-1825, DSN 756-1825

dkapolka@nps.edu

Program Manager

Kevin B. Smith, Ph. D.

Code PH/Sk, Spanagel Hall, Room 114

(831) 656-2107, DSN 756-2107

kbsmith@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Daphne Kapolka, Ph.D.

Code PH/Kd, Spanagel Hall, Room 202

(831) 656-1825, DSN 756-1825

dkapolka@nps.edu

ECE Representative

Monique Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Underwater Acoustic Systems curriculum is currently available to Distance Learning students and leads to either a Master of Science in Engineering Acoustics or a Master of Engineering Acoustics depending on whether the student completes a thesis. Students typically take one course per quarter for a period of 8 quarters (24 months) followed by a thesis or capstone project. They must also complete a one-week residency during their first 4000-level physics course to gain experience in experimental techniques. The courses are taught primarily via video-teleconferencing (VTC.) Downloadable recordings of the classes are available for students who do not have access to VTC or miss a class. Instructors also use the virtual classroom software, Blackboard Collaborate, for problem-solving sessions or individual help. The classes are usually timed to coincide with resident offerings. The course of studies is designed to improve the student's performance in operational, maintenance, and acquisition positions by providing them with a firm background in the fundamental science and engineering of acoustic systems.

Requirements for Entry

This curriculum is open to US and allied active duty military, government civilians, and defense contractors. Admission requires a baccalaureate degree with a major in engineering or physical science, completion of mathematics through differential equations and integral calculus, plus one year of calculus-based physics. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry.

Entry Date

The Underwater Acoustic Systems Program starts in the summer quarter.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

PH3119

(4-2)

Oscillations and Waves

Quarter 2

PH3451

(4-2)

Fundamental Acoustics

Quarter 3

PH3452

(4-2)

Underwater Acoustics

Quarter 4

PH4454

(4-2)

Sonar Transducer Theory and Design

Quarter 5

EO2402

(4-1)

Intro to Linear Systems

Quarter 6

EO3402

(3-1)

Signals and Noise

Quarter 7

EC4450

(4-1)

Sonar Systems Engineering

Quarter 8

PH4455

(4-0)

Sound Propagation in the Ocean

Quarter 9

PH4409

(2-4)

Engineering Acoustics Capstone Project

Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

www.nps.edu/MAE

Chairman

Garth V. Hobson, Ph.D.

Code ME/Hg, Bldg 215

(831) 656-2888

gvhobson@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Operations

Claudia C. Luhrs, Ph.D.

Code ME/Hg, Bldg 215

(831) 656-2568

ccluhrs@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Academics

Joshua H. Gordis, Ph.D.

Code ME/Go, Watkins Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2866, DSN 756-2866

jgordis@nps.edu

Associate Chair for Research

Marcello Romano, Ph.D.

Code ME/Ro, Watkins Hall, Room 324

(831)656-2885

mromano@nps.edu

Christopher A. Adams, Lecturer (2008); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Brij N. Agrawal, Distinguished Professor (1989); Ph.D., Syracuse University, 1970.

Kyle (Terry) Alfreind, Distinguished Visiting Professor(1989); Ph.D., Virginia Tech, 1967

Luke N. Brewer, Associate Professor (2010); Ph.D., Northwestern University, 2001.

Christopher M. Brophy, Associate Professor (1998); Ph.D., University of Alabama-Huntsville, 1997.

Muguru S. Chandrasekhara, Research Professor (1987); Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1983.

Jarema M. Didoszak, Assistant Professor (2004); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2003.

Vladimir N. Dobrokhodov, Research Associate Professor (2001); Ph.D., Zhukovskiy Air Force Engineering Academy, Russia, 1999.

Morris R. Driels, Professor (1989); Ph.D., City University of London, 1973.

Noel E. Du Toit, Research Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 2010.

Joseph C. Farmer, Visiting Professor (2010); Ph.D., University of California Berkley, 1983.

Stephen N. Frick, Visiting Professor (2011); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

Anthony J. Gannon, Research Assistant Professor (2006); Ph.D., University of Stellenbosch (2002).

Joshua H. Gordis, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Academics for ME (1992); Ph.D., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1990.

Garth V. Hobson, Professor and Chairman (1990); Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1990.

Douglas P. Horner, Research Assistant Professor (2005); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1999.

Kevin D. Jones, Research Associate Professor (1997); Ph.D., University of Colorado, 1993.

Isaac I. Kaminer, Professor (1992); Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1992.

Mark Karpenko, Research Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D., University of Manitoba, Canada, 2009.

Jae Jun Kim, Research Assistant Professor (2007); Seoul National University, 2004.

Young W. Kwon, Distinguished Professor (1990); Ph.D., Rice University, 1985.

Jack (John) R. Lloyd, Research Professor (2007); Ph.D., University of Minnesota, 1971.

Claudia C. Luhrs, Associate Professor and Associate Chair for Operations (2011); Ph.D., Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB-ICMAB), 1997.

Sarath K. Menon, Research Professor (2007); Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1985.

Knox T. Millsaps, Professor (1992); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1991.

Sebastian Osswald, Assistant Professor (2010); Drexel University, 2008.

Marcello Romano, Associate Professor (2004); Ph.D., Politecnico di Milano, Italy, 2001.

I. Michael Ross, Professor (1990); Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1990.

Sanjeev Sathe, Research Associate Professor (2012); Ph.D., Arizona State University, 1989.

Alan D. Scott, Senior Lecturer and Academic Associate for 591 and Astronautical Engineering(2008); Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineer, Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Douglas L. Seivwright, Research Associate (2005), M.S. Naval Postgraduate School, 1996.

Ramesh Sharma, Senior Lecturer (2012); Ph.D., University of Oxford, U.K., 1973.

Oleg A. Yakimenko, Professor (1989); Ph.D., Russian Academy of Sciences, 1991.

Professors Emeriti:

Robert E. Ball, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1967); Ph.D., Northwestern University, 1962.

Oscar Biblarz, Professor Emeritus (1968); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1968.

Charles N. Calvano, Professor Emeritus (1991); ED, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1970.

Allen E. Fuhs, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1966); Ph.D., California Institute of Technology, 1958.

Anthony J. Healey, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1986); Ph.D., Sheffield University, United Kingdom, 1966.

Matthew D. Kelleher, Professor Emeritus(1967); Ph.D., University of Notre Dame, 1966.

Paul J. Marto, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1965); Sc.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1965.

Terry R. McNelley, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1976); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1973.

David W. Netzer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1968); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1968.

Maximilian F. Platzer, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1970); Dr. Tech. Science; Technical University of Vienna, Austria, 1964.

Turgut Sarpkaya, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1967); Ph.D., University of Iowa, 1954.

Young S. Shin, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1981); Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 1971.

Raymond P. Shreeve, Professor Emeritus (1971); Ph.D., University of Washington, 1970.

E. Robert Wood, Professor Emeritus (1988); D. Eng., Yale University, 1967.

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Brief Overview

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (MAE) provides a strong academic program which spans the engineering disciplines of thermal-fluid sciences, structural and computational autonomous vehicles mechanics, dynamic systems, guidance and control, materials science and engineering, propulsion, and systems engineering, including total ship systems engineering, spacecraft, and missile design. These disciplines are blended together with a strong emphasis on Naval engineering applications required by surface vessels, submarines, aircraft, rotorcraft and spacecraft. Furthermore, the Department provides advanced education in classified topics in Astronautical Engineering. Programs leading to the degrees of Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering are accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. A specific curriculum must be consistent with the general minimum requirements for the degree as determined by the Academic Council. Any program leading to a degree must be approved by the Department Chairman at least two quarters before completion. In general, approved programs will require more than the stated minimum degree requirements in order to conform to the needs and objectives of the United States Navy, and satisfy the applicable subspecialty-code requirements.

Program Educational Objectives

Mechanical Engineering

The overall Program Educational Objective of the Mechanical Engineering Program is to support the NPS Mission by producing graduates who have knowledge and technical competence at the advanced level in Mechanical Engineering in support of national security. In order to achieve this goal, the specific objectives are to produce graduates who are expected to achieve the following within a few years of graduation:

  1. Have become technical experts who are able to formulate and solve important engineering problems associated with national security in Mechanical Engineering and related disciplines using the techniques, skills and tools of modern practice, including experiments, and modeling and simulation. These problems may include issues of research, design, development, procurement, operation, maintenance or disposal of engineering components and systems for military applications.
  2. Have assumed positions of leadership in the specification of military requirements in the organization and performance of research, design, testing, procurement and operation of technically advanced, militarily effective systems. The graduate must be able to interact with personnel from other services, industry, laboratories and academic institutions, and be able to understand the role that engineering and technology have in military operations, and in the broader national and global environment.
  3. Can communicate advanced technical information effectively in both oral and written form.

Astronautical Engineering

The overall Program Educational Objective of the NPS Astronautical Engineering Program is to support the NPS Mission by producing graduates who have knowledge and technical competence in astronautical engineering at the advanced level and who can apply that knowledge and competence to fill technical leadership roles in support of national security. In order to achieve this goal, the specific objectives are to produce graduates who achieve the following within a few years of graduation:

  1. Are established as a valued source of technical expertise in research, design, development, acquisition, integration and testing of national security space (NSS) systems including formulation of operational requirements, plans, policies, architectures, and operational concepts for the development of space systems.
  2. Have assumed positions of leadership involving program management, systems engineering, and/or operational employment of space systems within the national security space (NSS) enterprise.
  3. Have effectively managed the operation, tasking, and employment of national security space (NSS) systems to increase the combat effectiveness of the Naval Services, other Armed Forces of the U.S. and our partners, to enhance national security.

Degrees

The following degrees are available. Consistent with NPS Academic Policy, with the exception of the Engineer's or Doctoral degrees, all degree requirements must be satisfied independently. A student is able to earn an academic degree listed below while enrolled in Naval Mechanical Engineering (Curriculum 570), Reactors/Mechanical Engineering DL (Curriculum 571), Nuclear Power School/Mechanical Engineering DL (Curriculum 572), Space Systems Engineering (Curriculum 591), and Combat Systems Science and Engineering (Curriculum 533).

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

A candidate shall have completed academic work equivalent to the requirements of this department for the Bachelor of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. Candidates who have not majored in mechanical engineering, or who have experienced significant lapses in continuity with previous academic work, will initially take undergraduate courses in mechanical engineering and mathematics to fulfill these requirements in preparation for their graduate program.

The Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering requires:

  1. A minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work.
  2. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. There must be a minimum of 32 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a mini-mum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. Of the 32 quarter-hours at least 24 quarter-hours must be in courses offered by the MAE Department.
  3. A student seeking the Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering must also demonstrate competence at the advanced level in at least one of the available disciplines of Mechanical Engineering. These disciplines are the thermal-fluid sciences; solid mechanics, shock and vibration; dynamic systems and control; system design; and materials science. This may be accomplished by completing at least eight quarter-hours of the 4000 level credits by courses within one discipline, and a thesis in the same discipline.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits is also required for the Master of Science degree in Mechanical Engineering. An acceptable thesis for the degree of Mechanical Engineer may also meet the thesis requirement of the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree.
  5. The student's thesis advisor, the Academic Associate, the Program Officer and the Department Chairman must approve the study program and the thesis topic.

Master of Science in Astronautical Engineering

The Master of Science degree in Astronautical Engineering requires:

  1. A minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. There must be a minimum of 32 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. Of the 32 quarter-hours, at least 24 quarter-hours must be in courses offered by the MAE Department.
  2. A student must demonstrate knowledge of orbital mechanics, attitude determination, guidance and control, telecommunications, space structures, spacecraft rocket propulsion, space power, spacecraft thermal control, and spacecraft design and testing.
  3. The student must also demonstrate competence at the advanced level in one of the above disciplines of Astronautical Engineering. This may be accomplished by completing at least eight quarter-hours of the 4000 level credits by courses in this Department in a particular area and a thesis in the same discipline area. The typical specialization track is in Structures, Dynamics, and Control, and requires two (2) non-design AE48XX courses.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits is also required. The student's thesis advisor, the Academic Associate, the Program Officer, and the Department Chairman must approve the study program and the Thesis Proposal.

Master of Science in Engineering Science (Mechanical Engineering)

Candidates with acceptable academic background may enter a program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Mechanical Engineering). Candidates who have not majored in mechanical engineering or closely related subject areas, or who have experienced significant lapses in continuity with previous academic work, will initially take undergraduate courses in mechanical engineering and mathematics to prepare for their graduate program.

The Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Mechanical Engineering) degree requires:

  1. A minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. there must be a minimum of 32 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. Of the 32 quarter-hours, at least 24 quarter-hours must be in courses offered by the MAE Department.
  2. A student seeking the Master of Science in Engineering Science degree must also demonstrate competence at the advanced level in at least one of the available disciplines of Mechanical Engineering. These disciplines are the thermal-fluid sciences; solid mechanics, shock and vibration; dynamic systems and control; system design; and materials science. This may be accomplished by completing at least eight quarter-hours of the 4000 level credits by courses within one discipline, and a thesis in this same discipline.
  3. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits is also required for the Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Mechanical Engineering) degree. The student's thesis advisor, the Academic Associate, the Program Officer, and the Department Chairman must approve the study program and the thesis topic.

Under special circumstances as approved by the Academic Associate, the Program Officer, and the Department Chair, students may take four additional courses in lieu of a thesis. Those four additional courses should be at least 3000 and 4000 level courses offered by the MAE Department, and among them at least two courses should be at the 4000 level.

Entrance into the 571 Reactors/Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Program, leading to the degree Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Mechanical Engineering), is restricted to individuals who have successfully completed the Bettis Reactor Engineering School (BRES) and who have an academic profile code (APC) of 121 or better. All entrants must be nominated for the program by the designated program coordinator and primary consultant for Naval Reactors (SEA-08). See Curriculum 571 for details.

Entrance into the 572 Nuclear Power School/Mechanical Engineering Curriculum Program is restricted to graduates of the Officers Course of Naval Nuclear Power School and having an APC of (323), and undergraduate engineering degree or equivalent, and being nominated by their command. See Curriculum 572 for details.

Master of Science in Engineering Science (Astronautical Engineering)

Candidates with acceptable academic background may enter a program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Astronautical Engineering). Candidates who have not majored in astronautical engineering or closely related subject areas, or who have experienced significant lapses in continuity with previous academic work, will initially take undergraduate courses in astronautical engineering and mathematics to prepare for their graduate program.

The Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Astronautical Engineering) degree requires:

  1. A minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. there must be a minimum of 32 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. Of the 32 quarter-hours, at least 24 quarter-hours must be in courses offered by the MAE Department.
  2. A student must demonstrate knowledge of orbital mechanics, attitude determination, guidance and control, telecommunications, space structures, spacecraft/rocket propulsion, space power, spacecraft thermal control, and spacecraft design and testing.
  3. The student must also demonstrate competence at the advanced level in one of the above disciplines of Astronautical Engineering. This may be accomplished by completing at least eight quarter-hours of the 4000 level credits by courses in this department and a thesis in the same discipline area. The typical specialization track is in Structures, Dynamics, and Control, and requires two (2) non-design AE48XX courses.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits is also required. The student's thesis advisor, the Academic Associate, the Program Officer, and the Department Chairman must approve the study program and the Thesis Proposal.

Master of Science in Engineering Science (Aerospace Engineering)

Candidates with acceptable academic background may enter a program leading to the degree of Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Aerospace Engineering). Candidates who have not majored in aeronautical/aerospace engineering or closely related subject areas, or who have experienced significant lapses in continuity with previous academic work, will initially take undergraduate courses in aeronautical engineering and mathematics to prepare for their graduate program.

The Master of Science in Engineering Science (with major in Aerospace Engineering) degree requires:

  1. A minimum of 48 quarter-hours of graduate level work. The candidate must take all courses in an approved study program, which must satisfy the following requirements:
    1. there must be a minimum of 32 quarter-hours of credits in 3000 and 4000 level courses, including a minimum of 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
    2. Of the 32 quarter-hours, at least 24 quarter-hours must be in courses offered by the MAE Department.
  2. A student must demonstrate knowledge of aerodynamics, aircraft stability and control, avionics, aircraft structures, aircraft and missile propulsion.
  3. The student must also demonstrate competence at the advanced level in one of the above disciplines of Aeronautical Engineering. This may be accomplished by completing at least eight quarter-hours of the 4000 level credits by courses in this department and a thesis in the same discipline area. The typical specialization track is in Aircraft Structures, Aerodynamics, Stability and Control, Avionics or Propulsion.
  4. An acceptable thesis for a minimum of 16 credits is also required. The student's thesis advisor, the Academic Associate, the Program Officer, and the Department Chairman must approve the study program and the Thesis Proposal.

Mechanical Engineer

A graduate student with a superior academic record (as may be demonstrated by a graduate QPR of 3.70 or better) may apply to enter a program leading to the Mechanical Engineer Degree. A candidate must prepare his or her application and route it through the Program Officer to the Department Chairman for a decision. Typically, the selection process occurs after completion of the candidate's first year of residence.

A candidate must take all courses in a curriculum approved by the Chairman of the MAE Department. At a minimum, the approved curriculum must satisfy the requirements stated in the following list.

The Mechanical Engineer Degree requires:

  1. At least 64 quarter-hours of graduate level credits in Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, at least 32 of which must be at the 4000 level.
    1. At least 12 quarter-hours of graduate level credits must be earned outside of the MAE Department.
    2. At least one advanced mathematics course should be included in these 12 quarter-hours.
  2. An acceptable thesis of 28 credit hours is required for the Mechanical Engineer Degree. Approval of the thesis advisor and program must be obtained from the Chairman of the MAE Department.

Astronautical Engineer

A graduate student with a superior academic record (as may be demonstrated by a graduate QPR of 3.70 or better) may apply to enter a program leading to the Astronautical Engineer Degree. A candidate must prepare his or her application and route it through the Program Officer to the Department Chairman for a decision. Typically, the selection process occurs after completion of the candidate's first year of residence.

A candidate must take all courses in a curriculum approved by the Chairman of the MAE Department. At a minimum, the approved curriculum must satisfy the requirements stated in the following list.

The Astronautical Engineer Degree requires:

  1. At least 64 quarter-hours of graduate level credits in Astronautical Engineering or Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, at least 32 of which must be at the 4000 level.
    1. At least 12 quarter-hours of graduate level credits must be earned outside of the MAE Department.
    2. At least one advanced mathematics course should normally be included in these 12 quarter-hours.
  2. An acceptable thesis of 28 credit hours is required for the Astronautical Engineer Degree. Approval of the thesis advisor and program must be obtained from the Chairman of the MAE Department.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department offers Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Astronautical Engineering, and Aeronautical Engineering. Students having a superior academic record may request entrance into the doctoral program. All applicants will be screened by the departmental doctoral committee for admission. The department also accepts officer students selected in the Navy-wide doctoral program, qualified international officers, and DoD civilian students.

An applicant to the doctoral program who is not already at NPS should submit transcripts of previous academic and professional work. Also all applicants are required to submit a current Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test to the Director of Admissions, Naval Postgraduate School, 1 University Circle, He-022, Monterey, California 93943.

Every applicant who is accepted for the doctoral program will initially be enrolled in one of the following programs: Mechanical Engineer, Astronautical Engineer, or Aeronautical Engineer Program; under a special option which satisfies the broad departmental requirements for the Engineer's degree, which includes research work. As soon as feasible, the student must identify a faculty advisor to supervise research and to help formulate a plan for advanced study. As early as practicable thereafter, a doctoral committee shall be appointed to oversee that student's individual doctoral program as provided in the school-wide requirements for the doctor's degree. Joint programs with other departments are possible.

Special Programs

Along with degree programs, the department offers special programs that are sequences of courses along with capstone design projects that focus on the design of important military systems, such as platforms and weapons.

Total Ship Systems Engineering Program

The Total Ship Systems Engineering Program is an interdisciplinary, systems engineering and design-oriented program available to students enrolled in Mechanical or Astronautical or Aeronautical Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering or Combat Systems programs. The program objective is to provide a broad-based, design-oriented education focusing on the warship as a total engineering system. The sequence of electives introduces the student to the integration procedures and tools used to develop highly complex systems such as Navy ships. The program culminates in a team-performed design of a Navy ship, with students from all three curricula as team members. Students enrolled in programs leading to the Engineer's degree are also eligible for participation. Entry requirements are a baccalaureate degree in an engineering discipline with a demonstrated capability to perform satisfactorily at the graduate level. The appropriate degree thesis requirements must be met, but theses that address system design issues are welcome.

Missile Systems Engineering Program

The Missile Systems Engineering Track is an option that can be perused within the framework of the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) or Master of Science in Engineering Science Degree programs. This program is a regular part of the TEMASEK program, but is also open to DoD contractors, as well and all U.S. Military and DoD Civilian Students. The program provides a solid engineering foundation in analysis and design techniques involved in developing offensive and defensive missile systems.

This option consists of a four-course sequence of special missile courses embedded in the normal MSME or MSES(ME) degree program of courses and a thesis.

The courses for this program are:

  1. ME3205 Missile Aerodynamics
  2. AE4452 Advanced Missile Propulsion
  3. ME4703 Missile Flight Dynamics and Control
  4. ME4704 Missile Design

NPS works with industry, primarily with Raytheon Missile Systems Division in Tucson, AZ, to create this unique blend of high-quality academic courses and “real word” systems engineering focus in missile design and manufacturing, leading to a program of unique military relevance.

Autonomous Systems Engineering Program

The Autonomous Systems Engineering Track is an option that can be perused within the framework of the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering (MSME) or Master of Science in Engineering Science degree programs. This program is open to DoD contractors, as well and all U.S. Military and DoD Civilian Students. The program can be completed in four to six quarters, depending on academic preparedness of the student, and is developed around several core courses related to modeling and guidance navigation and control algorithms design for autonomous underwater, surface, ground, aerial systems, satellites and spacecraft. Additional course electives can be taken to enhance specialty areas, along with thesis research related to a specific type of an autonomous system or its component, or a wide range of other useful military technologies.

The core courses of the program are:

The final course in this sequence, Unmanned Systems Design, is a capstone course that integrates the material into a design of (a component of) an autonomous underwater, surface, ground, aerial, or space system, its algorithm or sensor to be tested within the tactical network environment during quarterly field experiments at Camp Roberts Training Site.

Laboratories

MAE Laboratories are designed to support the educational and research mission of the Department. In addition to extensive facilities for the support of student and faculty research, a variety of general use equipment is available. This includes equipment and facilities for the investigation of problems in engineering mechanics; a completely equipped materials science laboratory, an oscillating water tunnel, an underwater towing tank and a low turbulence water channel; a vibration and structural dynamics laboratory; a fluid power controls laboratory; a robotics and real-time control laboratory; facilities for experimentation with low velocity air flows.

NPS Center for Autonomous Vehicle Research: The primary goal of the NPS Center for Autonomous Vehicle Research (CAVR) is to educate students in the development and use of technologies needed for unmanned vehicles through coursework, thesis and dissertation research. The secondary goal of the CAVR is to advance Naval autonomous vehicle operations by providing support to the fleet, Navy labs and Program offices, testing and experimentation of advanced technologies, independent verification and validation of a variety of novel autonomous vehicles concepts, and by innovative concept development. Currently the CARV houses two autonomous submarines (Aries and REMUS), Sea Fox surface vehicle and a wide variety of Tier I and Tier II class unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) staring from Scan Eagle UAV and all way down to miniature flapping-wing vehicles.

CAD/CAE Computer Laboratory: This lab consists of Windows PCs and is used heavily by students for both class and thesis related work. This lab has a wide range of special mechanical engineering software for analysis and design. This facility includes a 128 processor cluster for large scale computations.

Additional Laboratories

Nano/MEMS Laboratory: This laboratory provides a facility for teaching the emerging technologies of Nano/MEMS.

Fluid Mechanics and Hydrodynamics Laboratories: The fluid mechanics laboratory supports instruction in basic courses in fluid mechanics. It is equipped with a small wind tunnel for specific instructional purposes. The hydrodynamics laboratory includes a unique U-shaped oscillating water tunnel for the study of a wide range of phenomena, such as flow about stationary and oscillating bodies, vortex-induced vibrations, stability of submarines and boundary layers, and vortex-free-surface interactions. The hydrodynamics laboratory also houses a recirculating water tunnel for numerous flow-separation and vibration phenomena and a vortex-breakdown facility for the investigation of the stability of swirling flows. These facilities are supported by a 3-beam Laser-Doppler-Velocimeter, numerous other lasers, high-speed motion analyzers, data-acquisition systems, and dedicated computers for numerical simulations.

Materials Laboratory: Laboratory supports teaching and research in processing, characterization, and testing of advanced structural, functional, and nanotechnology materials for defense applications.

Marine Propulsion Laboratory

This laboratory has gas turbine (Allison C-250) and diesel (Detroit 3-53) engines connected to water brake dynamometers, located in separate, isolated engine test cells. These engines are instrumented to obtain steady-state performance and high-frequency, time-resolved measurements. Aerothermodynamic, acoustic, and vibration phenomena in turbo-machinery and reciprocating engines are being investigated, particularly relating to non-uniform flow and condition-based maintenance (CBM) in naval machinery. These engines are used for both instructional and applied research programs in the area of marine power and propulsion. In addition, this lab has bench-top rotordynamics experiments for demonstrating high-speed machinery balancing and investigating rotordynamic instabilities. The lab has sub-scale flow facilities for developing and testing low observable (stealth) technologies for engine inlets and exhausts.

Rocket Propulsion Laboratory

This lab conducts research on advanced concepts in solid, liquid, and combined mode propellants. Experimental and computational research is conducted in the areas of propellant mixing, combustion, pulse detonation, thrust control, and plume mixing. A full range of mechanical and optical diagnostic techniques are used on small and subscale experiments.

Structural Dynamics Laboratory

This lab is devoted to structural dynamics and is especially designed to facilitate both teaching and research into vibration and shock effects associated with underwater explosions, as well as related shipboard vibration problems. The ability to validate simulation models with lab-scale tests is critical for student education. The lab includes a state of the art multi-channel data acquisition system, and a large variety of transducers and instrumentation.

Thermal Engineering Laboratories

These labs are used mainly for instruction in heat transfer to investigate convection phenomena of single and multi-phase flows and include facilities for measurement of temperature change and fluid motion in a range of systems. The lab also includes equipment/instrumentation for measurements in microelectronics and micro-heat exchanger systems.

Ship Systems Engineering (TSSE) Laboratory

This is an integrated design center in which student teams perform a capstone design project of a Navy ship. Ship design encompasses hull, mechanical, and electrical systems as well as combat systems, and is done in cooperation with the Meyer Institute.

Astronautical Engineering Laboratories

Research Centers

The following Research Centers are organized in the MAE Department:

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Course Descriptions

AE Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<AE Courses AE0810-AE4452>

AE0810 Thesis Research (0-8)

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course. Prerequisites: None.

AE2440 Introduction to Scientific Programming (Same as EC2440) (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course offers an introduction to computer system operations and program development using NPS computer facilities. The main goal of this course is to provide an overview of different structured programming techniques, along with introduction to MATLAB/Simulink/GUIDE and to use modeling as a tool for scientific and engineering applications. The course discusses the accuracy of digital computations, ways to incorporate symbolic computations, and presents numerical methods in MATLAB functions. PREREQUISITES: Knowledge of single variable calculus and matrix algebra. This course can be offered as an online course.

AE2820 Introduction to Spacecraft Structures (3-2)

Review of statics and strength of materials. Beam theory: axial, bending, shear and torsional loading, stress analysis and deflection of beams. Design of spacecraft structures for launch loads and a survey of typical launch vehicles. Beam buckling and vibration, critical buckling loads, natural frequencies, and mode shapes. Truss structures and introduction to the finite element method. Prerequisites: None.

AE3804 Thermal Control of Spacecraft (3-0)

Conduction, radiation, thermal analysis, isothermal space radiator, lumped parameter analytical model, spacecraft passive and active thermal control design, heat pipes, and louvers. Prerequisites: None.

AE3811 Space Systems Laboratory (2-2)

Principles of spacecraft test programs; component, subsystem, and system level tests; military standard test requirements for space vehicles, laboratory experiments in Fltsatcom Laboratory on satellite performance, in Spacecraft Test Laboratory for vibration, modal and thermal tests; and in Spacecraft Attitude Control Laboratory for spacecraft control performance. Graded Pass/Fail. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

AE3815 Spacecraft Rotational Mechanics (3-2)

Coordinate system transformations (GCI, LVLH, etc.), time differentiation operator, velocity and acceleration in 3D-frames of reference, Poisson's equations, spacecraft application examples (strapdown INS, etc.), angular momentum, inertia tensor transformations, Newton-Euler equations of motion, spin stability, single-spin spacecraft, nutation and precession, energy-sink analysis, passive nutation control, dynamics and stability of dual spin spacecraft, gravity-gradient stabilization. Prerequisites: SS3500, MA2121, MA3046, and AE2440 or equivalent.

AE3818 Spacecraft Attitude, Determination, and Control (3-2)

Spacecraft attitude linear control: linearized attitude control, three-axis-stabilized spacecraft. Non-linear attitude control design: minimum-time slewing maneuver, quaternion feedback. Actuators for attitude control: Thrusters, Reaction Wheels, Control Moment Gyroscopes, Magnetotorquers, and related topics (thrust modulation and mapping, CMG steering laws and singularities, momentum dumping). Sensors for attitude and rate determination: star sensors, horizon sensor, sun sensor, gyroscopes. Attitude determination methods: deterministic approach (Triad algorithm), statistic approach (Wabha problem), stochastic approach (Kalman Filter). The labs focus on the practical solution of significant attitude control and determination problems by simulations in Matlab-Simulink. Prerequisites: EC2300 or equivalent, and AE3815.

AE3820 Advanced Mechanics and Orbital Robotics (3-2)

This course is an intermediate level analysis of the dynamics of space systems, including: ascent and descent of rockets, tethers, yo-yo despin, spinning hubs with flexible appendages, single stage to orbit, and various problems in spacecraft attitude dynamics such as nutation dampers. The analysis will include developing the equation of motion, equilibrium and stability analysis, solutions of nonlinear systems using perturbation methods and numerical techniques. Computational and symbolic manipulator packages will be used extensively. Prerequisites: MA2121.

AE3830 Spacecraft Guidance and Control (3-2)

Overview of the Spacecraft Guidance, Navigation, and Control System. Sources and effects of navigation and modeling errors on guidance and control systems. Error propagation techniques: linearization of spacecraft dynamical equations, covariance propagation and Monte Carlo simulations. Applications to spacecraft rendezvous and attitude control. Introduction to optimal control theory. Optimal bang-bang control for spacecraft thrusters. Linear-quadratic control problems and feedback control. Selection of weights and performance analysis. Perturbation guidance. Application of the matrix Riccati equation to spacecraft stability, control and guidance. Prerequisites: MA2121, SS3500, EC2300 or equivalent, and AE3815.

AE3851 Spacecraft Propulsion (3-2)

Introduces concepts and devices in spacecraft propulsion. It reviews fundamental fluid mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and thermodynamics with molecular structure. Conventional chemical means such as H2/O2 and monopropellants are discussed. Electric propulsion schemes (resistojets, arc-jets, ion, magneto-plasma-dynamic, etc.) are introduced and their performances contrasted with chemical schemes. Characteristics of more advanced concepts (laser, solar, nuclear, etc.) are also considered. Prerequisites: None.

AE3852 Propulsion for Launch Vehicles (4-0)

Introduction to propulsion for launch vehicles, beginning with mission energy requirements and an overview of current and proposed launch propulsion devices. Performance analysis, operating characteristics and propellant selection criteria are considered for air breathing and solid, liquid and nuclear rocket motor propulsion systems. Advanced cycles and concepts are presented. Design of components and subsystems. Prerequisites: ME3201.

AE3870 Computational Tools for Spacecraft Design (2-4)

In this course, the students become familiar with the use of computer aided design tools for spacecraft subsystems and system design. The tools are for conceptual spacecraft design trade-offs and detailed subsystem design, such as for structures, thermal, attitude control, and communications. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

AE4362 Astrodynamics (3-0)

Review of the two-body problem. The effects of a third point mass and a distributed mass. Expansion of the disturbing potential in series of Legendre functions. Variation of parameter equations for osculating orbital elements. Perturbation and numerical solution techniques. Statistical orbit determination. Codes used by the military to maintain the catalog of artificial satellites and space debris. Prerequisites: SS3500 or equivalent.

AE4452 Advanced Missile Propulsion (4-1)

Analysis and design of solid propellant rockets, ramjets, dual-combustion ramjets, scramjets and ducted rockets. Propellant selection criteria and characteristics, combustion models and behavior, performance analysis, combustor design, combustion instabilities and damping, mission and flight envelope effects on design requirements and technology requirements. Use of performance and grain design codes (SPP, PEP, and NASA SP233) and laboratory test firings for comparison with measured performance. Prerequisites: AE3852 or consent of instructor.

<AE Courses AE4502-AE5810>

AE4502 Supersonic and Hypersonic Flows (4-0)

One-dimensional, compressible flow is reviewed. Two-dimensional and axis-symmetric supersonic of ideal gases. Oblique shocks and expansion waves. General compressible flow equations. Potential supersonic and conical flows. Compressible scaling and transonic area ruling. Effects of very high velocity and low density. Hypersonic flow. Mach number independence and equivalence principles. Newtonian method. Blunt and slender body solutions. Real gas behavior and effect on shock and boundary layers. Applications are presented to satellite parasitic drag and re-entry flows. Prerequisites: ME3201 or consent of instructor.

AE4506 Rarefied Gas Dynamics (4-0)

Topics include advanced thermodynamics with molecular structure, kinetic theory, distribution functions, Boltzmann equation and transport phenomena from a kinetic theory point of view. Types of flow range from free-molecule to transition, to high temperature continuum. Numerical approaches are discussed. Applications to space problems and hypersonics are treated. Prerequisites: ME3201 or equivalent.

AE4816 Dynamics and Control of Space Structures (4-0)

Review of dynamics, finite element method, structural natural frequencies, mode shapes, and control of flexible structures. Smart sensors and actuators and applications to active vibration control, shape control, vibration isolation and fine beam pointing. Equation of motion of spacecraft with flexible structures, and control of spacecraft and flexible structures. The interaction of flexibility and control. Impact of flexibility on the performance of military spacecraft and future trends. Prerequisites: Graduate AE3830, ME3521, and EC2300 or equivalent.

AE4818 Acquisition, Tracking, and Pointing of Military Spacecraft (3-2)

Acquisition, tracking, and pointing (ATP) requirements for military spacecraft, effects of jitter on ATP performance, jitter control, acquisition system, tracking algorithms, laser beam control, spacecraft attitude control using control moment gyros, example of ATP designs for military spacecraft, laboratory experiments on spacecraft attitude control and laser beam control. Prerequisites: AE3818.

AE4820 Robotic Multibody Systems (3-2)

This course focuses on the analytical modeling, numerical simulations and laboratory experimentation of autonomous and human-in the loop motion and control of robotic multibody systems. Systems of one or more robotic manipulators that are fixed or mounted on a moving vehicle are treated. Applications are given for under-water, surface, ground, airborne, and space environments. The course reviews basic kinematics and dynamics of particles, rigid bodies, and multibody systems using classical and energy/variational methods. The mechanics and control of robotic manipulators mounted on fixed and moving bases are considered. The course laboratories focuses on analytical and numerical simulations as well as hands-on experimentation on hardware-in-the-loop. Prerequisites: ME2502 (or equivalent) or AE3815 (or equivalent).

AE4830 Spacecraft Systems I (Intended For Curriculum 366) (3-2)

This course emphasizes the systems analysis of geosynchronous spacecraft and covers the analysis of GNC (orbit and attitude control), structures, propulsion, thermal and electrical power subsystems. Basic mathematical equations will be used in the preliminary design of the subsystems and the tradeoff studies involved. The differences and similarities between dual-spin and three-axis stabilized spacecraft will be covered in detail. Systems aspect of a typical mission profile will be illustrated. Throughout, emphasis will be on the spacecraft bus. Students will be engaged in problem solving during most of the laboratory period. Prerequisites: Completion of Space Operations core-curriculum.

AE4831 Spacecraft Systems II (Intended for Curriculum 366) (3-2)

In this course, students will be involved in a group project to design a spacecraft to meet mission requirements. Material presented in AE4830 as well as AE4831 will be utilized. In parallel, this course covers some or all of the following aspects of spacecraft systems: spacecraft testing, TT&C subsystem, and design of observation payloads. Differences and similarities between geosynchronous spacecraft and LEO/HEO spacecraft will be discussed. Topics include gravitational perturbation (J2 effects), gravity-gradient stabilization, and atmospheric drag effects. Prerequisites: AE4830.

AE4850 Astrodynamic Optimization (3-2)

This course develops basic measures of performance of a space vehicle (including launch vehicles) with methods to target a set of conditions and optimize the performance. Topics include an overview of the Guidance, Navigation and Control System, fundamentals of nonlinear programming, state-space formulation, vehicle and environmental models, performance measures, problem of Bolza, the Maximum Principle, and transversality conditions. A significant focus of the course will be in practical methods and numerical techniques, particularly pseudospectral methods. Computational methods will be used to solve a wide range of problems in astrodynamic optimization arising in military space, such as rapid spacecraft reorientation and targeting problems, launch-on-demand, strategic low-thrust orbital maneuvers, and optimal formation-keeping strategies. Where appropriate, the course will illustrate systems aspects of mission design. Prerequisites: MA2121, SS3500, and AE3815.

AE4860 Military Space Maneuvers (2-2)

This course develops the fundamentals of tactical and strategic space maneuvers and addresses the issues pertaining to space warfare. The course covers a wide range of specific military maneuvers that include their mathematical modeling, mission definitions, mission design and optimization. Special attention will be paid to the class of following maneuvers: pursuit-evasion problems, orbital intercept, destructive and nondestructive asset denial problems, rapid retargeting and minimum-time space maneuvers. These maneuvers and certain elements of high-speed velocity guidance will be modeled, simulated, optimized and analyzed as part of the laboratory sessions. Students will also gain practical experience in a state-of-the-art software to analyze the implementation of future military space maneuvers. Additional details pertaining to the course are classified. Prerequisites: MA2121, SS3500, and AE3815. Classification: Security Clearance Required: Secret/NOFORN

AE4870 Spacecraft Design and Integration I (4-0)

Principles of spacecraft design considerations, spacecraft configurations, design of spacecraft subsystems, interdependency of designs of spacecraft subsystems, launch vehicles, mass power estimation, and trade-offs between performance, cost, and reliability. The emphasis is on military geosynchronous communications satellites. The course includes an individual design project. Prerequisites: AE2820, AE3804, AE3851, AE3818, EC3230.

AE4871 Spacecraft Design and Integration II (2-4)

A team project-oriented course on design of non-geosynchronous spacecraft systems. Provides understanding of the principles of space system design, integration, and systems engineering, and their application to an overall spacecraft mission. Considerations are given to cost, performance, and test plan. Several DoD/NASA organizations, such as Naval Research Laboratory and Jet Propulsion Laboratory, provide support in the definition of the mission requirements for the project, spacecraft design, and design reviews. Prerequisites: AE4870.

AE4902 Directed Study in Astronautical Engineering (V-V)

Directed advanced study in Astronautical Engineering on a subject of mutual interest to student and staff member after most of a student's electives have already been taken. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. This course is graded on a Pass/Fail basis only. Prerequisites: Consent of Department Chairman.

AE5810 Dissertation Research (0-8)

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

ME Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<ME Courses ME0810-ME3801>

ME0810 Thesis Research (0-8)

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course.

ME0820 Integrated Project (0-12)

Integrated project.

ME0951 MAE Seminars (No Credit) (0-1)

Lectures on subjects of current interest are presented by NPS faculty and invited experts from other universities and government or industrial activities. All ME students must register for this course every quarter.

ME1000 Preparation for Professional Engineers Registration (3-0)

The course will cover the topics from the 8-hour Professional Examination given by the State of California for Professional Engineer. Discussion will involve applicable engineering techniques, including design and analysis of mechanical systems and components. Prerequisites: Prior passage of Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Exam or consent of instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

ME2101 Engineering Thermodynamics (4-2)

A comprehensive coverage of the fundamental concepts of classical thermodynamics, with insight toward microscopic phenomena. The laws of thermodynamics. Equations of state. Thermodynamic properties of substances. Entropy, irreversibility and availability. Cycle analysis, gas-vapor mixtures, combustion. Prerequisites: MA1115.

ME2201 Introduction to Fluid Mechanics (3-2)

Properties of fluids, hydrostatics and stability of floating and submerged bodies. Fluid flow concepts and basic equations in steady flows: mass, momentum, and energy considerations. Dimensional analysis and dynamic similitude. Viscous effects and fluid resistance. Drag and separated flow over simple bluff bodies. Prerequisites: ME2503.

ME2501 Statics (3-0)

Forces and moments, particles and rigid bodies in equilibrium. Simple structures, friction, first moments and centroids. Prerequisite: MA1115 (may be taken concurrently).

ME2502 Dynamics (4-1)

Kinematics and kinetics of particles and rigid bodies. Rectilinear, plane curvilinear, and space curvilinear motion. Newton's laws of motion. Work, energy, impulse and momentum, and impact. Plane motion of rigid bodies. Relative motion in translating and rotating frames of reference. Gyroscopic forces and motion. Prerequisite: ME2501.

ME2503 Engineering Statics and Dynamics (5-0)

Forces and moments, equilibrium equations, statically indeterminate objects, trusses, methods of joints and sections, centroids, composites, rectilinear and plane curvilinear motion, absolute and relative motion, work and energy, virtual work, impulse and momentum, impact, system of particles, rigid body motion, moving frame, plane motion, fixed-axis rotation. Prerequisites: MA1115 (may be concurrent).

ME2601 Mechanics of Solids I (4-1)

Stress-strain. Plane stress and plane strain, principal stresses, maximum shear stress, thermal stress, Mohr's circle, axial loading, indeterminate members, pressure vessels, elastic torsion, indeterminate torsion, shear moment diagram, elastic bending, beam deflection, combined loading, theory of failure. Supporting laboratory work. Prerequisites: ME2502 or ME2503 and MA1115 or equivalent.

ME2801 Introduction to Control Systems (Offered Jointly) (3-2) Fall/Spring

This course presents classical analysis of feedback control systems using basic principles in the frequency domain (Bode plots) and in the s-domain (root locus). Performance criteria in the time domain such as steady-state accuracy,

transient response specifications, and in the frequency domain such as bandwidth and disturbance rejection are introduced. Simple design applications using root locus and Bode plot techniques will be addressed in the course. Laboratory experiments are designed to expose the students to testing and evaluating mathematical models of physical systems, using computer simulations and hardware implementations.ME2801 and EC2300 are equivalent courses. PREREQUISITES: AE2440/EC2440 and MA2121. This course can be offered as an online course. Familiarity with the MATLAB development environment is assumed.

ME3150 Heat Transfer (4-1)

Introduction to the various modes of heat transfer and their engineering applications. Steady and unsteady conduction involving the use of thermal circuit analogs, analytical, and numerical techniques. Introduction to conservation of mass, momentum and energy. External and internal forced convection fundamentals and correlation. External natural convection. Boiling. Condensation. Heat exchanger analysis and design including a design project. Thermal radiation. Prerequisites: ME2101, ME2201, and MA3132 (may be taken concurrently).

ME3201 Applied Fluid Mechanics (4-1)

Steady one-dimensional compressible flow. Fundamentals of ideal-fluid flow, potential function, stream function. Analysis of viscous flows, velocity distribution in laminar and turbulent flows, introduction to the elements of the Navier-Stokes equations, solution of classical viscious laminar flow problems. Applications to Naval Engineering. Prerequisites: ME2101, ME2201, and MA3132 (may be taken concurrently).

ME3205 Missile Aerodynamics (4-1)

Potential flow, thin-airfoil and finite wing theories. Linearized equations, Ackeret theory, Prandtl-Glauert transformations for subsonic and supersonic wings. Planform effects. Flow about slender bodies of revolution, viscous crossflow theory. Prerequisites: ME3201.

ME3240 Marine Power and Propulsion (4-2)

This course provides an introduction to the basic principles of power and propulsion systems, with an emphasis on performance of platforms and weapons for naval applications. The laws of thermodynamics and fluid mechanics are applied to analyze and design of components and systems. The thermodynamics of simple gas and vapor cycles are presented, including the Otto, Diesel, Brayton and Ranking cycles, and complex and combined cycles with intercooling, reheat, regeneration and combined cycles. The aerothermodynamics of compressors, combustors, turbines, heat exchangers, inlets and nozzles are presented along with preliminary design methods, such as meanline design of turbomachinery. Component matching and engine operation of simple gas generators is treated. Mechanical and structural design aspects of engine development are presented. Propeller characteristics and propulsion/vehicle integration are presented. This course includes laboratories on gas turbines, diesels and turbomachinery. Prerequisites: ME2101, ME3201, ME3521, (ME3201 and ME3521 may be taken concurrently).

ME3410 Mechanical Engineering Instrumentation and Measurement Lab (2-4)

Introduction to measurement systems, statistical analysis of data, error analysis, uncertainty analysis, manipulation of data including electrical readout and processing, data acquisition fundamentals and Fourier decomposition and dynamic signals. Measurements of temperature, pressure, velocity, flow rates. Energy balances, surface temperature visualization, flow visualization. Measurement of motion using accelerometers and encoders. Measurement of strain and force. Operational amplifiers, analog computers, filters. Prerequisites: ME3611, ME2801, ME3150, ME3521 (ME3150 and ME3521 may be taken concurrently).

ME3440 Engineering Analysis (4-0)

Rigorous formulation of engineering problems arising in a variety of disciplines. Approximate methods of solution. Finite difference methods. Introduction to finite element methods. Prerequisites: ME2201, ME2502 or ME2503, and ME3611.

ME3450 Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering (3-2)

The course introduces students to the basic methods of numerical modeling for typical physical problems encountered in solid mechanics and the thermal/fluid sciences. Problems that can be solved analytically will be chosen initially and solutions will be obtained by appropriate discrete methods. Basic concepts in numerical methods, such as convergence, stability and accuracy, will be introduced. Various computational tools will then be applied to more complex problems, with emphasis on finite element and finite difference methods, finite volume techniques, boundary element methods and gridless Lagrangian methods. Methods of modeling convective non-linearities, such as upwind differencing and the Simpler method, will be introduced. Discussion and structural mechanics, internal and external fluid flows, and conduction and convection heat transfer. Steady state, transient and eigenvalue problems will be addressed. Prerequisites: ME3150, ME3201, ME3611.

ME3521 Mechanical Vibration (3-2)

Elements of analytical dynamics, free and forced response of single degree and multi-degree of freedom systems. Dynamic response using modal superposition method. Properties of stiffness and inertia matrices, orthogonality of modal vectors, eigenvalue problem, modal truncation, vibration isolation and suppression. Vibration of bars, shafts, and beams. Supporting laboratory work. Prerequisites: ME2503, ME2601, MA2121 or equivalent (may be taken concurrently).

ME3611 Mechanics of Solids II (4-0)

Differential equations of bars, shafts and beams with Macauley functions. Unsymmetric bending. Curved beams. Shear flow in thin walled sections. Shear center. Torsion of thin walled open sections. Thick walled cylinders. Energy including Castigliano and unit dummy load methods for displacements. Statically indeterminate systems including beams, frames, trusses, arches and combined structures. Prerequisite: ME2601.

ME3711 Design of Machine Elements (4-1)

Design of representative machine elements with consideration given to materials selection, tolerances, stress concentrations, fatigue, factors of safety, reliability, and maintainability. Typical elements to be designed include fasteners, columns, shafts, journal bearings, spur and helical gears, and clutches and brakes. In addition to traditional design using factors of safety against failure, particular emphasis is placed on design for specified reliability using probabilistic design methods. Prerequisites: ME3611.

ME3712 Capstone Design (1-6)

Design teams apply integrated and systematic design processes to real multifunctional and multidisciplinary problems in mechanical systems. Students develop process concepts, planning, design methodology, material selection, manufacturing and engineering analysis. Capstone design projects include projects provided by industry partners as well as DoD sponsors. The scope of design problems range across both engineering and non-engineering issues in the integrated design process. Prerequisites: ME2801, ME3150, ME3201, ME3450, ME3521, ME3711, MS3202, OS3104.

ME3720 Introduction to Unmanned Systems (3-2)

This course provides an overview of unmanned systems technology and operations, including navigation, vehicle dynamics, power and propulsion, communications, navigation, motion planning fundamentals. Operational and design considerations for single and multi-vehicle operations are presented. Volume and weight limitations on payload and range are covered as are energy and power constraints. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor.

ME3750 Platform Survivability (4-0)

This course introduces the concepts and analytical tools used in designing and testing survivable combat platforms and weapon systems. The applications are to a broad range of platforms and weapons, including submarines, surface ships, fixed and rotary wing aircraft, cruise missiles, and satellites in a hostile (non-nuclear) environment. The technology for increasing survivability and the methodology for assessing the probability of surviving hostile environments are presented. Topics covered include: current and future threat descriptions; the mission/threat analysis; combat analysis of SEA, vulnerability reduction technology for the major systems and subsystems; susceptibility reduction concepts, including stealth; vulnerability, susceptibility, and survivability assessment; and trade-off methodology. Prerequisites: None.

ME3780 Introduction to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems Design (3-3)

This is a class introducing students to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Topics include material considerations for MEMS and microfabrication fundamentals; Surface, bulk and non-silicon micromachining; forces and transduction; forces in micro- nano- domains and actuation techniques. Case studies of MEMS based microsensor, microactuator and microfluidic devices will be discussed. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) of MEMS devices and group design projects. Prerequisites: EC2200, or MS2201 or PH1322 or consent of instructor.

ME3801 Dynamics and Control of Marine and Autonomous Vehicles I (3-2)

First part of the course develops 6DOF equations of motion of marine and autonomous vehicles. Initially we discuss kinematics, followed by vehicle dynamics and overview of forces and moments acting on the marine/autonomous vehicles. Second part of the course introduces basic concepts of linear systems analysis as well as linear systems design using state-space techniques. All the examples used in the second part of the course are based on the model of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle derived in the first part. The course includes a lab that further illustrates the concepts developed in class using hardware-in-the-loop simulation of an autonomous vehicle. Prerequisite: ME2801.

<ME Courses ME4101-ME4550>

ME4101 Advanced Thermodynamics (4-0)

This course reviews elementary definitions, concepts and laws of thermodynamics and then extends these to cover general thermodynamics, and advanced topics. The concepts of availability, exergy, irreversibility, and general equilibrium conditions in single and multi-component systems are presented. Ideal and non-ideal solutions and chemical potential are treated along with an introduction to statistical thermodynamics and non-equilibrium concepts such as Osager's reciprocal relations. Prerequisites: ME2101.

ME4160 Applications of Heat Transfer (4-0)

Applications of heat transfer principles to engineering systems. Design topics include heat exchangers (e.g., boilers, condensers, coolers), cooling electronic components, heat pipes, solar collectors, turbine blade cooling. Prerequisites: ME3150.

ME4161 Conduction Heat Transfer (4-0)

Steady-state heat conduction in multi-dimensions with and without heat sources. Transient conduction. Numerical methods for heat conduction. Mechanical Engineering applications. Prerequisites: ME3150.

ME4162 Convection Heat Transfer (4-0)

Fundamental principles of forced and free convection. Laminar and turbulent duct flows and external flows. Dimensionless correlations. Heat transfer during phase changes. Heat exchanger analysis with Mechanical Engineering applications. Prerequisites: ME3150, ME3201, ME4220, or consent of instructor.

ME4163 Radiation Heat Transfer (4-0)

Basic laws and definitions. Radiation properties of surfaces. Radiant interchange among diffusely emitting and reflecting surfaces. Applications and solutions of the equations of radiant interchange. Radiant interchange through participating media. Combined conduction and radiation. Prerequisites: ME3150.

ME4202 Compressible and Hypersonic Flow (4-0)

One-dimensional, compressible flow is reviewed. Two-dimensional and axis-symmetric supersonic of ideal gases. Oblique shocks and expansion waves. General compressible flow equations. Potential supersonic and conical flows. Compressible scaling and transonic area ruling. Effects of very high velocity and low density. Hypersonic flow. Mach number independence and equivalence principles. Newtonian method. Blunt and slender body solutions. Real gas behavior and effect on shock and boundary layers. Applications are presented to satellite parasitic drag and re-entry flows. Prerequisites: ME3201 or consent of instructor.

ME4211 Applied Hydrodynamics (4-0)

Fundamental principles of hydrodynamics. Brief review of the equations of motion and types of fluid motion. Standard potential flows: source, sink, doublet, and vortex motion. Flow about two-dimensional bodies. Flow about axisymmetric bodies. Added mass of various bodies and the added-mass moment of inertia. Complex variables approach to flow about two-dimensional bodies. Conformal transformations. Flow about hydro and aerofoils. Special topics such as dynamic response of submerged bodies, hydroelastic oscillations, etc. Course emphasizes the use of various numerical techniques and the relationship between the predictions of hydrodynamics and viscous flow methods. Prerequisites: ME3201.

ME4220 Viscous Flow (4-0)

Development of continuity and Navier-Stokes equations. Exact solutions of steady and unsteady viscous flow problems. Development of the boundary-layer equations. Similarity variables, numerical and integral techniques. Separation, boundary-layer control. Time-dependent boundary layers. Origin and nature of turbulence, phenomenological theories, calculation of turbulent flows with emphasis on naval engineering applications, and numerical models and CFD. Prerequisites: ME3201 and consent of instructor.

ME4225 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer (3-2)

This course presents numerical solution of sets, of partial differential equations, that describe fluid flow and heat transfer. The governing equations for fluid dynamics are reviewed and turbulence modeling is introduced. Discretization techniques are applied to selected model equations and numerical methods are developed for inviscid and viscous, compressible and incompressible flows. Individual term projects include application of CFD to thesis research and to current military problems. Prerequisites: ME3201 or ME3450.

ME4231 Advanced Turbomachinery (3-2)

The underlying principles governing flow through and energy exchange in turbomachines are developed to provide a basis for understanding both design and advanced computational methods. Key considerations and procedures followed in the design of new aircraft engine fans, compressors and turbines are introduced. Lectures are coordinated with experimental test experience at the Turbopropulsion Laboratory. Prerequisites: ME3240.

ME4240 Advanced Topics in Fluid Dynamics (4-0)

Topics selected in accordance with the current interests of the students and faculty. Examples include fluid-structure interactions, cable strumming, wave forces on structures, free-streamline analysis of jets, wakes, and cavities with emphasis on computational fluid dynamics. Prerequisites: ME4220 and ME4211.

ME4251 Engine Design and Integration (3-2)

The conceptual and preliminary component, subsystem, and systems design of military, or military related, airbreathing engines, along with the integration of the engine in a platform, is experienced within student design teams. The course is focused on a team response for a Request-for-Proposal (RFP) for an engine meeting specific requirements. Performance, cost, supportability, deployment, manufacturing, product quality and environmental considerations may be included in the design process. The project draws on all of the mechanical engineering disciplines. Prerequisites: ME3240.

ME4420 Advanced Power and Propulsion (4-0)

This course presents an advanced treatment of power and propulsion topics, primarily for naval applications. Thermodynamic analysis of simple, advanced and complex cycles, such as combined and augmented cycles (e.g., RACER and STIG) are presented along with new and direct energy conversion concepts. Design integration of single and multi-type (CODAG, CODOG, etc.) power and propulsion systems with vehicles. Engine installation considerations, including the design of auxiliary equipment and inlet/exhaust systems, are presented. Design and current research topics in fluid mechanics and rotordynamics of turbomachinery are presented. Repair, condition-based maintenance and machinery operation, including balance techniques, are discussed. Prerequisites: ME3240.

ME4522 Finite Element Methods in Structural Dynamics (4-0)

This course provides an introduction to the principles and methods of computational structural dynamics and vibration analysis. Modern computational methods make use of the matrix structural models provided by finite element analysis. Therefore, this course provides an introduction to dynamic analysis using the finite element method, and introduces concepts and methods in the calculation of modal parameters, dynamic response via mode superposition, frequency response, model reduction, and structural synthesis techniques. Experimental modal identification techniques will be introduced. Prerequisites: ME3521.

ME4525 Naval Ship Shock Design and Analysis (4-0)

Characteristics of underwater explosion phenomena, including the shock wave, bubble behavior and bubble pulse loading, and bulk cavitation. Surface ship/submarine bodily response to shock loading. Application of shock spectra to component design. Dynamic Design Analysis Method (DDAM) and applications to shipboard equipment design. Fluid-Structure Interaction (FSI) analysis, including Doubly Asymptotic Approximation (DAA) and surface ship FSI. Current design requirements for shipboard equipment. Prerequisites: ME3521 or equivalent.

ME4550 Random Vibrations and Spectral Analysis (3-2)

Engineering application of spectral analysis techniques to characterize system responses under a random vibration environment. Characteristics of physical random data and physical system responses. Application of probability concepts to random data and response analysis. Correlation and spectral density functions. Transmission of random vibration. System responses to single/multiple random excitations. Failure due to random vibration. Supporting laboratory work. Prerequisites: ME3521 or equivalent.

<ME Courses ME4612-ME5810>

ME4612 Advanced Mechanics of Solids (4-0)

Selected topics from advanced mechanics of materials and elasticity. Stress and strain tensors. Governing equations such as equations of equilibrium, constitutive equations, kinematic equations and compatibility equations. Two-dimensional elasticity problems in rectangular and polar coordinate systems. Airy stress function and semi-inverse technique. Energy methods with approximate solution techniques including Rayleigh-Ritz method. Buckling of imperfect columns. Introduction to plate and shell bending theory. Prerequisites: ME3611.

ME4613 Finite Element Methods (4-0)

Introduction to the fundamental concepts of the finite element method. Weighted residual methods and weak formulation. Element discretization concept and shape functions. Generation of element matrices and vectors, and their assembly into the matrix equation. Application of boundary and initial conditions. Isoparametric elements and numerical integration techniques. Computer programming and application to engineering problems such as boundary value, initial value and eigenvalue problems. Prerequisites: ME3611, ME3440 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

ME4620 Theory of Continuous Media (4-0)

Tensor analysis. Stress and strain tensors. Motion of continuum. Energy and entropy. Constitutive equations. Applications to elasticity and fluid dynamics. Prerequisites: ME3201 and ME3611.

ME4700 Weaponeering (3-2)

Describes and quantifies methods commonly used to predict the probability of successfully attacking ground targets. Initial emphasis is on air launched weapons, including guided and unguided bombs, air-to-ground missiles, LGBs, rockets and guns. Course outlines the various methodologies used in operational products used widely in the USN, USAF and Marine Corps. Prerequisites: ME2502 or MA2121, or equivalent. Some capability in MS Excel and MATLAB, or permission of instructor.

ME4702 Engineering Systems Risk Benefit Analysis (3-2)

This course emphasizes three methodologies, Decision Analysis (DA), Reliability and Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA) and Cost-Benefit Analysis (CBA). The course is designed to give students an understanding of how these diverse topics can be applied to decision making process of product design that must take into consideration significant risk. The course will present and interprets a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically these involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts from CBA and RPRA are applied for real world problems resulting in decision models that provide insight and understanding, and consequently, leading to improved decisions. Same course as OS4010. Prerequisites: OS3104/EO4021 or equivalent course in probability, or consent of instructor.

ME4703 Missile Flight and Control (4-1)

Static and dynamic stability and control; transient modes; configuration determinants; subsonic, transonic, supersonic force and moment data for performance calculations with short and long-range cruciform missiles and cruise missiles; acceleration, climb, ceiling, range and agility in maneuvering trajectories. Principles of missile guidance, including guidance control laws, and six degree-of-freedom motion simulations. Additional topics are selected from the following areas to address the general interests of the class: advanced guidance laws, passive sensors, INS guidance, fire control and tracking systems. Prerequisites: ME3205 and ME2801 or equivalent.

ME4704 Missile Design (3-2)

Conceptual missile design methodology centered around a student team design project, focused on a military need defined by a Request-for-Proposal. It stresses the application aerodynamics, propulsion, flight mechanics, cost, supportability, stability and control and provides the student with their application to design. Consideration is given to trade-offs among propulsion requirements, air loads, quality sensors, guidance laws, quality, controls, and structural components. Prerequisites: PREREQUISITE: ME3205, ME4703 or equivalent, AE4452.

ME4731 Engineering Design Optimization (4-0)

Application of automated numerical optimization techniques to design of engineering systems. Algorithms for solution of nonlinear constrained design problems. Familiarization with available design optimization programs. State-of-the-art applications. Solution of a variety of design problems in mechanical engineering, using numerical optimization techniques. Prerequisites: ME3450, ME3150, ME3201, ME3611.

ME4751 Combat Survivability, Reliability, and systems Safety Engineering (4-1)

This course provides the student with an understanding of the essential elements in the study of survivability, reliability and systems safety engineering for military platforms including submarines, surface ships, fixed-wing and rotary wing aircraft, as well as missiles, unmanned vehicles and satellites. Technologies for increasing survivability and methodologies for assessing the probability of survival in a hostile (non-nuclear) environment from conventional and directed energy weapons will be presented. Several in-depth studies of the survivability various vehicles will give the student practical knowledge in the design of battle-ready platforms and weapons. An introduction to reliability and system safety engineering examines system and subsystem failure in a non-hostile environment. Safety analyses (hazard analysis, fault-tree analysis, and component redundancy design), safety criteria and life cycle considerations are presented with applications to aircraft maintenance, repair and retirement strategies, along with the mathematical foundations of statistical sampling, set theory, probability modeling and probability distribution functions. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

ME4753 Risk Analysis and Management for Engineering Systems (3-2)

This course covers three areas in the risk field - Qualitative Risk Analysis, Quantitative Risk Analysis, and Decision Risk Analysis. Qualitative Risk Analysis presents techniques for risk identification/evaluation, risk handling, risk monitoring and risk management. Quantitative Risk Analysis includes Probabilistic Risk Assessment (RPRA) of system performance and project cost/schedule. Decision Risk Analysis gives the students an understanding of how to apply risk and cost benefit techniques in decision making when one must deal with significant risk or uncertainty. The course will present a framework for balancing risks and benefits to applicable situations. Typically these involve human safety, potential environmental effects, and large financial and technological uncertainties. Concepts are applied toward representative problems resulting in risk and decision models that provide insight and understanding, and consequently lead to more successful projects/programs with better system performance within cost and schedule. This is the same course as SE4353. Prerequisites: OS3180/OS3104, or equivalent graduate level course in probability, or consent of the instructor.

ME4780 Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design II (2-4)

Same as EC4280 and PH4280. This is the second course in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design. This course will expose students to advanced topics on material considerations for MEMS, microfabrication techniques, forces in the micro- and nano- domains, and circuits and systems issues. Case studies of MEMS based microsensors, microactuators and microfluidic devices will be discussed. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) and characterization of existing MEMS devices. The grades will be based on exams, lab projects, and a group design project. Prerequisites ME/EC/PH3280 or ME3780 or consent of instructor.

ME4811 Autonomous Systems and Vehicle Control II (3-2)

Multivariable analysis and control concepts for MIMO systems. State Observers. Disturbances and tracking systems. Linear Optimal Control. The linear Quadratic Gaussian compensator. Introduction to non-linear system analysis. Limit cycle behavior. Prerequisites: ME3801.

ME4812 Fluid Power Control (3-2)

Fluids and fluid flows in high-performance actuators and controllers. Power flow and fluid power elements, valve and pump control, linear and rotary motion. State space descriptions. Design of electro-hydraulic position and velocity control servo-mechanisms for high performance with stability. Prerequisite: ME3801.

ME4821 Marine Navigation (3-2)

This course presents the fundamentals of inertial navigation, principles of inertial accelerometers, and gyroscopes. Derivation of gimbaled and strapdown navigation equations and corresponding error analysis. Navigation using external navigation aids (navaids): LORAN, TACAN, and GPS. Introduction to Kalman filtering as a means of integrating data from navaids and inertial sensors. Prerequisite: ME3801.

ME4822 Guidance Navigation and Control of Marine Systems (3-2)

This course takes students through each stage involved in the design, modeling and testing of a guidance, navigation and control (GNC) system. Students are asked to choose a marine system such as an AUV, model its dynamics on a nonlinear simulation package such as SIMULINK and then design a GNC system for this system. The design is to be tested on SIMULINK or a similar platform. Course notes and labs cover all the relevant material. Prerequisites: ME4801 or consent of instructor.

ME4823 Cooperative Control of Multiple Marine Autonomous Vehicles (4-0)

This course covers selected topics on trajectory generation and control of multiple marine autonomous vehicles. First part of the course addresses techniques for real-time trajectory generation for multiple marine vehicles. This is followed by introduction to algebraic graph theory as a way to model network topology constraints. Using algebraic graph theory formalism Agreement and Consensus problems in cooperative control of multiple autonomous vehicles are discussed, followed by their application to cooperative path following control of multiple autonomous vehicles. Lastly, the course covers topics suggested by the students, time permitting. Prerequisites: ME3201, ME3801 or permission of instructor.

ME4825 Marine Propulsion Control (3-2)

Introduction to dynamic propulsion systems modeling and analysis methods. Control design specifications and design strategies. Introduction to modern control design theory and multivariable methods. Theory and applications of optimal control and discrete-time control systems. Case studies of current naval propulsion control systems. Prerequisites: ME3801, ME3240 (may be taken concurrently), and MA3132.

ME4901 Advanced Topics in Mechanical (Aerospace) Engineering (V-V)

Advanced study in Mechanical (Aerospace) Engineering generally on a subject not covered in existing courses. May be repeated for credit with a different topic. This course number should be used to initiate new advanced courses. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairman and instructor. This course may not be taken on a Pass/Fail Basis.

ME4902 Directed Study in Mechanical (Aerospace) Engineering (V-V)

Directed advanced study in Mechanical (Aerospace) Engineering on a subject of mutual interest to student and faculty member after most of a student's electives have already been taken. This is typically a "Reading" course directed by a faculty member. This course may be repeated for credit with a different topic. Prerequisite: Permission of Department Chairman and instructor. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

ME5810 Dissertation Research (0-8)

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

MS Courses

Place-holder text. Do not remove.

<MS Courses MS2201-MS4822>

MS2201 Introduction to Materials Science and Engineering (3-2)

This is a first course in Materials Science and Engineering and emphasizes the basic principles of microstructure-property relationships in materials of engineering and naval relevance. Topics include crystalline structure and bonding, defects, thermodynamics and kinetics of reactions in solids, deformation, strengthening mechanisms and heat treatment. Students will acquire a working vocabulary and conceptual understanding necessary for advance study and for communication with materials experts. Prerequisites: Undergraduate courses in calculus, physics and chemistry.

MS3202 Properties, Performance and Failure of Engineering Materials (3-2)

The purpose of this course is to advance the students' understanding of the fundamentals of materials science, while putting that understanding in the context of the behavior of materials in engineering applications. Contemporary developments in engineering materials such as composites, ceramics and polymers are considered, as well as traditional engineering alloys such as steels and aluminum alloys. Performance and failure histories of materials in service will be studied, as well as conventional textbook subjects. Examples pertinent to Naval, Aero and Combat Systems Science are emphasized. Topics include mechanical properties, fracture, fatigue, failure analysis and corrosion. Prerequisites: MS2201 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MS3203 Structural Failure, Fracture and Fatigue (3-2)

Theories of yield and fracture for aircraft design limit loads and ultimate loads; stress-life and strain-life fatigue theories of crack initiation in aircraft structures subjected to realistic flight load spectra, using Neuber's approximation and incorporating the Miner concept of cumulative damage. Fatigue crack propagation concepts and Navy methods of fleet structural fatigue tracking and monitoring. Prerequisites: MS3202, ME2601.

MS3214 Intermediate Materials Science and Engineering (4-0)

The purpose of this course is to provide a bridge between the introductory courses in materials science, MS2201 and MS3202, and the 4000 level elective courses in materials science. The emphasis is on a deepening of understanding of basic principles which govern the behavior of solid materials. Principles of physical metallurgy and the physics of materials will be considered in detail. Topics include thermodynamics of solids, electronic structure of alloys, lattice stability, phase equilibria, diffusion, dislocation theory, deformation mechanisms and an introduction to the kinetics of phase transformations. The course is intended to show how the application of basic principles leads to clearer understanding and control of the behavior and properties of contemporary materials. Prerequisites: MS2201 and MS3202 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MS3304 Corrosion and Marine Environmental Deterioration (3-2)

The fundamentals of corrosion science and the practice of corrosion engineering are discussed. The objectives include an appreciation of the varied causes, mechanisms and effects of corrosion. Fundamental topics such as basic electrochemistry, polarization and passivity are covered. A primary goal of the course is the development of skill in the recognition and prevention of a wide variety of types of corrosion. Standard methods of corrosion control are discussed, including cathodic protection, coatings, alloy selection and inhibitors. Prerequisites: MS2201 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MS3606 Introduction to Welding and Joining Metallurgy (3-2)

Welding and joining are presented from the point of view of metallurgy. Topics include the nature and applications of welding and joining processes; the welding thermal cycle; metallurgical effects of the welding thermal cycle; welding and joining of steels, aluminum alloys, stainless steels and heat-resistant alloys. Also, weldment inspection and quality assurance are introduced. Prerequisites: MS2201 and MS3202 or consent of instructor.

MS4215 Phase Transformations (3-2)

The mechanisms and kinetics of structural changes in solid materials are considered in detail. A wide variety of transformation mechanisms are studied, including solidification, recrystallization, precipitation and martensitic transformation. The basic principles which govern these reactions are developed, including principles of nucleation and growth, diffusion and lattice distortion. The relevance of various transformations to practical heat treatment, thermomechanical processing, and technological advances is discussed. Microstructural recognition and methods of monitoring phase transformations are included. Changes in properties which result from phase transformations are given limited attention. Prerequisites: MS3214 or equivalent or consent of instructor.

MS4312 Characterization of Advanced Materials (3-2)

This course is structured to provide an insight into the various tools available for advanced physical examination of engineering materials. Topics covered include X-ray diffraction and optical, scanning, transmission and scanning transmission electron microscopies. Prerequisites: MS3202 or consent of instructor.

MS4410 Advanced Energy Materials (4-1)

The course was designed for military officers in situations where they are either directly involved in the use of batteries, fuel cells, or managing similar programs where such systems are designed, developed, or procured. Given the Navy's historic use of battery technology in submarines and aboard other platforms, the course provides both scientific understanding of key electrochemical concepts and expertise in evaluating energy storage technologies for military application. The course gives an overview on existing energy conversion and storage technologies, and provides a solid foundation in electrochemistry and chemical engineering. Lectures cover important energy concepts in thermodynamics, electrokinetics, and mass transport. The course then discusses the physics, chemistry, material requirements, performance, and operational aspects of a full range of energy conversation and storage technologies, including, but not limited to, primary and secondary batteries, fuel cells, supercapacitors, thermoelectric generators, photovoltaics, and biofuels. The reforming of natural gas, ethanol, and other carbon-based fuels into hydrogen for use in fuel cells will also be discussed, along with solid-state, pressurized-gas, and cryogenic hydrogen storage. Pertinent Navy-relevant examples are given, including the application of lithium ion battery technologies to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), and use of fuel cell and solid-state hydrogen storage technologies in submarines with Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP). Prerequisites: MS3304.

MS4811 Mechanical Behavior of Engineering Materials (4-0)

The response of structural materials to stress is discussed, including elastic and plastic deformation and fracture. Topics include elastic response and the modules of elasticity; plasticity; deformation mechanisms and dislocation theory; strengthening mechanisms; and fatigue and fracture. Application to materials development is also considered. Prerequisites: MS3202, and MS3214 or consent of instructor.

MS4822 The Engineering and Science of Composite Materials (4-0)

This course focuses on the structure-property correlation in composites utilizing a multi-disciplinary approach, covering the areas of materials science and engineering and solid mechanics. Emphasis is given to the theoretical constitutive behavior at the micro- and macro-levels, as well as on how such behavior can be altered by processing and service variables. The course is divided into three broad parts: (1) Theoretical predictions of composite properties; (2) Materials issues (including processing) complicating accurate performance prediction; and (3) Thermo-mechanical behavior in actual service conditions. Prerequisites: ME3611, MS3202 or equivalent.

MX Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<MX Courses MX2001-MX4000>

MX2001 Introduction to Physics-Based Modeling and Simulation (4-0)

This course is intended for DoD non-technical acquisition professionals who do not have engineering or science degrees so that they can obtain a general understanding of key M&S capabilities necessary for design, analysis, and maintenance of engineering systems. The course will introduce basic concepts in the modeling of engineering systems. The steps involved in the idealization of systems to produce a "computable" model will be discussed. Examples will involve structural, thermal, fluid, and electrical aspects. Fundamental physical quantities such as rates of change, (e.g. acceleration, stress) and force will defined heuristically. The simulation of simple physical processes (e.g. falling object) will described and simple simulation algorithms will be described. No computer programming is required. Spatial discretization, finite difference and finite element methods will be introduced. This course may not be used to fulfill ME/AE degree program requirements. Prerequisites: None.

MX3001 Basic Engineering Concepts in Modeling & Simulation I (4-0)

This course will provide introductory concepts of various engineering topics to DoD non-technical acquisition professionals who do not have engineering or science degrees so that they can obtain a general understanding of key M&S capabilities necessary for design, analysis, and maintenance of engineering systems. The topics covered in the course include structural mechanics, shock & vibrations, fluids, heat transfer & thermodynamics, dynamics and controls, and materials and fabrication. Upon completion, students should have basic understanding of the wide range of engineering concepts that are essential for physics-based engineering modeling and simulation. This course may not be used to fulfill ME/AE degree program requirements. Prerequisite: MX2001.

MX3002 Overview of Computers, Weapons Platforms and Electrical Systems (4-0)

This course will provide introductory concepts of various engineering topics to the DoD Modeling and Simulation workforce member supporting Defense Acquisition so that they can obtain a general understanding of key M&S capabilities necessary for design, analysis, and maintenance of computers, weapons platforms, and Electrical engineering systems. The topics covered in the course include wave propagation, modeling and simulation approaches to complex system design and assessment, fundamentals of computer software and its limitations, basic concepts in electrical engineering and electrical machinery, and the fundamental issues involved in C4ISR systems. Upon completion, students should have basic understanding of the wide range of engineering concepts that are essential for physics-based engineering M&S. This course may not be used to fulfill ME/AE degree program requirements. Prerequisites: MX2001, MX3001.

MX4000 Selected Topics in the Application of Engineering Modeling & Simulation (4-0)

This course provides the DoD acquisition professional with an overview of how typical engineering modeling and simulation applications support the acquisition process. A systematic approach will be used to demonstrate the function of physics based modeling and simulation in the design, production, operation and maintenance of complex systems. The course is broken into four general topic areas that address specific engineering features related to land vehicle systems, sea based systems, aviation systems and space-satellite systems. Investigations into the feasibility, utility, and risk of engineering modeling and simulation in each of these focus areas will be highlighting through the use of engineering case studies. Upon completion of this course, students should have a general awareness of engineering modeling and simulation applications in support of the acquisition lifecycle. This course may not be used to fulfill ME/AE degree program requirements. Prerequisites: MX2001, MX3001, MX3002.

TS Courses

Place-holder text. Do not remove.

<TS Courses TS3000-TS4003>

TS3000 Electrical Power Engineering (3-2)

An overview of the principles, concepts and trade-offs which form the foundation for shipboard electric power systems. The composition of electrical power systems for present and future Navy vessels is presented. Theory necessary to understand interactions among shipboard electric power system components is discussed. The interactions between the electric power system and the various types of loads is introduced. Prerequisites: None.

TS3001 Fundamental Principles of Naval Architecture (3-2)

The geometry, hydrostatics and hydrodynamics of monohull and other floating and submerged bodies; Froude similarity; wave and skin friction resistance; powering determination. Longitudinal and transverse stability of floating bodies. Hull girder strength. Introduction to seakeeping and passive survivability principles. Prerequisites: ME2201, ME2601 or consent of instructor.

TS3002 Principles of Ship Design and Case Studies (3-2)

Systems engineering in the design of complex systems; systems architecture and interface engineering and the Navy design environment. The systems development process, including need identification, requirements, feasibility determination, risk reduction, contract and detailed design. The iterative, multilevel ship design process, with affordability as a fundamental feature; modern ship design and construction methods, systems engineering techniques and tools. Case studies, ship design trends, design exercises and illustrations. Prerequisites: TS3001.

TS3003 Naval Combat System Elements (3-2)

This course will cover combat system detection and engagement elements. This includes radar, ESM, active and passive sonar, infrared, warheads, guns, missiles, torpedoes, fire control and countermeasures. The emphasis will be on what the elements contribute to a combat system, their basic principles of operation, their performance limitations, and their interfaces with the rest of the combat system. Details on specific elements and systems will be limited to those needed to illustrate basic principles and interactions affecting systems engineering. Prerequisites: ME2503, or equivalent or consent of instructor.

TS4000 Naval Combat System Engineering (3-2)

Covers the definition and integration of naval combat systems. The emphasis will be on how the various detection, engagement, and control elements interact with each other and on how to combine them into an efficient and survivable combat system. Also addressed will be topside arrangements, signature reduction, readiness assessment, embedded training, and support system interfaces. Prerequisites: TS3000, TS3003.

TS4001 Integration of Naval Engineering Systems (3-2)

A system-oriented approach to integrating the principles of Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering in the design of ship subsystems. Lectures and projects exploring engineering design tools and analysis methods to meet specified systems requirements are used. Projects on hull, mechanical and electrical ship systems design are emphasized. The impact of systems design on other systems and subsystems and on the ship, including affordability, military effectiveness and survivability at the whole ship level are considered. Prerequisites: TS3000, TS3001, TS3002.

TS4002 Ship Design Integration (2-4)

The ship-impact of requirements/cost/performance tradeoffs within technical and acquisition constraints. Conversion of broad military requirements to mission-based ship requirements and specific tasks resulting from those requirements. Exploration of alternative methods of satisfying requirements, leading to combat systems (payload) definition. Conduct of feasibility studies to investigate whole-ship alternatives which meet requirements. Selection of a best design approach. Design considerations for unusual ship types and an assessment of future Navy ship and combat systems needs and trends. Prerequisites: TS4001 and TS4000.

TS4003 Total Ship Systems Engineering (2-4)

The design of a Naval vessel as a single engineering system satisfying mission requirements, with emphasis on affordability and survivability. The interaction and interfacing of various subsystems such as hull, propulsion, and combat systems will be explored through a joint ship “preliminary design” project to produce a balanced ship design based on the alternative chosen from feasibility studies conducted in TS4002. Concepts of design optimization within constraints. Prerequisites: TS4002.

Engineering Modeling and Simulation Certificate - Curriculum 279

Program Manager

Knox Millsaps

Watkins Hall, Room 338

(831) 656-3382, DSN 756-3382

millsaps@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Engineering Modeling & Simulation certificate is comprised of four courses (MX-2001, MX-3001, MX-3002 and MX-4000). Upon completion of this certificate program, students will be awarded a certificate of completion from the Naval Postgraduate School. The Engineering Modeling & Simulation Certificate program is targeted primarily at personnel in the DoD Acquisition Workforce but has great benefit for all students who seek further knowledge regarding the application of physics-based modeling and simulation in support of the acquisition lifecycle.

Requirements for Entry

For entry, the student must have a baccalaureate degree with a Minimum APC or 334.

Program Length

Four quarters.

Graduate Certificate Requirements

To earn the academic certificate students must pass all four courses with a C+ (2.3 Quality Point Rating (QPR)) or better in each course and an overall QPR of 3.0 or better. Students earning grades below these standards will need to retake the courses to bring their grades within standards or they will be withdrawn from the program.

Required Courses

Quarter 1

MX2001

(4-0)

Introduction to Physics- Based Modeling and Simulation

Quarter 2

MX3001

(4-0)

Basic Engineering Concepts in Modeling & Simulation I

Quarter 3

MX3002

(4-0)

Overview of Computers, Weapons Platforms and Electrical Systems

Quarter 4

MX4000

(4-0)

Selected Topics in the Application of Engineering Modeling & Simulation

Naval/Mechanical Engineering (Energy Focus) - Curriculum 563

Program Officer

Michael Porter, CDR, USN

Code 74, Watkins Hall, Room 107A

(831) 656-2033, DSN 756-2033

maporter1@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Joshua H. Gordis, Ph.D.

Code ME/Go, Watkins Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2866, DSN 756-2866

jgordis@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The objective of this program is to provide graduate education, primarily in the field of Naval/Mechanical Engineering with a focus on Energy, including production, storage, and use. This program is designed to produce graduates with the technical competence to operate and maintain modern warships and naval systems. It establishes a broad background of basic engineering knowledge leading to advanced studies in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, control systems, solid mechanics and vibrations, material science, energy production, storage and usage. The graduate will be able to participate in technical aspects of naval systems acquisition for technological advances in naval ships and systems, particularly as they apply to energy. Through emphasis on the design aspect within the program, the graduate will be well prepared to apply these advances in technology to the warships of the future. An original research project focusing on either Energy, Power and Propulsion Systems or Energy Materials resulting in a satisfactory thesis is an integral part of the curriculum.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree or its equivalent is required, preferably in an engineering discipline. A minimum academic profile code (APC) of 323 is required (334 with one quarter refresher). This equates to a minimum grade point average of 2.20, with mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based physics as non-waiverable requirements. The program is open to naval officers in the rank of LTJG through LCDR and equivalent grade officers of other U.S. services and qualified foreign military officers. DoD civilian employees and DoD Contractors are also eligible.

Entry Date

Naval/Mechanical Engineering (Energy Specialty) is typically an eight-quarter program with preferred entry dates in March or September. For further information contact the Program Officer or the Academic Associate.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree, which is an ABET EAC accredited degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the educational skill requirements of the curricular program.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a Naval/Mechanical Engineering Specialist with a subspecialty code of 5603P. The curriculum sponsors are Naval Sea Systems Command and Navy Energy Coordination Office.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 0

MA1113

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I

MA1114

(4-0)

Single Variable Calculus I w/Matrix Algebra

ME2501

(4-0)

Engineering Statics

AE2440

(3-2)

MATLAB

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 1

MA1115

(4-0)

Multivariable Calculus

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Calculus

ME2502

(5-0)

Engineering Dynamics

ME2101

(4-2)

Thermodynamics

NW3230

(4-0)

Maritime and Joint Strategic Planning

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 2

MA2043

(4-0)

Linear Algebra

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

ME2601

(4-1)

Mechanics of Solids I

MS2201

(3-2)

Materials Science

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 3

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations

MA3232

(4-0)

Numerical Analysis

ME3611

(4-0)

Mechanics of Solids II

ME2201

(3-2)

Fluid Mechanics I

PH3700

(4-0)

Fundamentals of Energy Technology

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 4

EO2102

(4-2)

Intro to Circuit & Power Systems Analysis

ME3521

(3-2)

Mechanical Vibrations

ME3201

(4-1)

Applied Fluid Mechanics

ME3150

(4-1)

Heat Transfer

OS3007

(4-1)

Operations Research for Energy Systems Analysis

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 5

ME2801

(3-2)

System Dynamics

ME3450

(3-2)

Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering

ME3711

(4-1)

Machine Design

MS3202

(3-2)

Failure Analysis and Prevention

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 6

ME3240

(4-2)

Marine Power and Propulsion

ME3712

(4-2)

Systems Design

ME3801

(3-2)

Dynamics and Control of Marine and Autonomous Vehicles I

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Energy Specialization Elective

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 7

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research (Energy)

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research (Energy)

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Energy Specialization Elective

MS3304

(3-2)

Corrosion (can substitute MS3606 Welding)

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Quarter 8

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

TS3001

(3-2)

Naval Architecture

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Energy Specialization Elective

EN3000

(2-0)

Defense Energy Seminar

Naval/Mechanical Engineering - Curriculum 570

Program Officer

Michael Porter, CDR, USN

Code 74, Watkins Hall, Room 107A

(831) 656-2033, DSN 756-2033

maporter1@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Joshua H. Gordis, Ph.D.

Code ME/Go, Watkins Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2866, DSN 756-2866

jgordis@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The objective of this program is to provide graduate education, primarily in the field of Naval Mechanical Engineering, in order to produce graduates with the technical competence to operate and maintain modern warships and naval systems. It establishes a broad background of basic engineering knowledge leading to advanced studies in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, control systems, solid mechanics and vibrations and material science. The graduate will be able to participate in technical aspects of naval systems acquisition for technological advances in naval ships and systems. Through emphasis on the design aspect within the program, the graduate will be well prepared to apply these advances in technology to the warships of the future. An original research project resulting in a finished thesis is an integral part of the curriculum.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree or its equivalent is required, preferably in an engineering discipline. A minimum academic profile code (APC) of 323 is required (334 with one quarter refresher). This equates to a minimum grade point average of 2.20, with mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based physics as non-waiverable requirements. The program is open to naval officers in the rank of LTJG through LCDR in the 11XX/14XX community, equivalent grade officers of other U.S. services and qualified foreign military officers. DoD employees are also eligible.

Entry Date

Naval/Mechanical Engineering is typically an eight-quarter program with preferred entry dates in January or June. Refresher quarters are offered in March and September and is recommended for non-engineering undergraduates and those out of school greater than 5 years. Time in residence may be reduced by course validations depending on the officer's specific academic background. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer or the Academic Associate.

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the educational skill requirements of the curricular program.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a Naval/Mechanical Engineering Specialist with a subspecialty code of 5601P. The curriculum sponsor is Naval Sea Systems Command. A limited number of particularly well qualified students may be able to further their education beyond the master's degree and seek the degree of Mechanical Engineer and a 5601N Subspecialty Codes.

Typical Subspecialty Billets

Upon award of the 5601P/5602P subspecialty code, the officer becomes eligible for assignment to those billets identified as requiring graduate education in Naval/Mechanical Engineering. Typical of these billets are the following:

Industrial Activities - Shipyard, SUPSHIP, Ship Repair Facility, SIMA

Mechanical Engineering Instructor, USNA

Tender Repair Officer (Engineering Duty Officer)

Fleet/Type Commander Staff

Board of Inspection and Survey

Propulsion Examining Board

OPNAV/NAVSEA

Chief Engineer (Ships and Submarines)

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

MA1115

(4-0)

Multivariable Calculus

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Calculus

ME2502

(4-1)

Dynamics

MS2201

(3-2)

Materials Science

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy & Policy

Quarter 2

MA2043

(4-0)

Matrix and Linear Algebra

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

ME2101

(4-1)

Mechanics of Solids

ME2201

(3-2)

Materials Science

ME2801

(3-2)

System Dynamics

Quarter 3

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations

MA3232

(4-1)

Numerical Analysis

ME2601

(4-1)

Mechanics of Solids I

ME3801

(3-2)

Dynamics and Control of Marine and Autonomous Vehicles I

EO2102

(4-2)

Basic Electronics and Electrical Machines

Quarter 4

ME3711

(4-1)

Machine Design

ME2201

(3-2)

Introduction to Fluid Dynamics

MS3202

(3-2)

Failure Analysis and Prevention

ME3611

(4-0)

Mechanics of Solids II

Quarter 5

ME3151

(4-1)

Heat Transfer

ME3201

(4-1)

Applied Fluid Mechanics

ME3712

(4-2)

Systems Design

Quarter 6

MS3304

(3-2)

Corrosion

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Specialization Elective

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Specialization Elective

Quarter 7

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

TS3001

(3-2)

Naval Architecture

ME3521

(3-2)

Mechanical Vibrations

ME3240

(4-2)

Marine Power and Propulsion

Quarter 8

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME3450

(3-2)

Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Elective

Total Ship Systems Engineering (Under Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering)

Program Director

Fotis A. Papoulias

Code ME/PA, Watkins Hall, Room 323

(831) 656-3381, DSN 756-3381

papoulias@nps.edu

Total Ship Systems Engineering

The objective of this program is to provide a broad-based, design-oriented education focusing on the warship as a total engineering system, including hull, mechanical, electrical and combat systems. The program is for selected Naval/Mechanical Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering students and is structured to lead to the MSME, MSEE, or MS in Physics. Entry to the Total Ship Systems Engineering program is through the standard 533, 570, 590, 591 curricula.

Entry Date

Total Ship Systems Engineering will generally fit as part of an eight-or nine-quarter program, with TSSE elective commencing in October. The ease of accommodating TSSE in a student's program is influenced by the student's NPS entry quarter and undergraduate background and performance. Individuals interested in the program should explore the necessary course sequencing with the program officer or academic associate as early as possible.

Subspecialty

Completion of this program will contribute toward the graduates' subspecialty code within his/her designated curriculum. The student will also receive the 5602P subspecialty code for completion of the TSSE Program.

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Upon award of the subspecialty code, a Naval officer would be eligible for assignments typical of the Navy P-Code. The expectation is that the combination of education and experience would lead to individuals qualified for assignment later in their career to more responsible positions in systems design and acquisition in NAVSEA, SPAWAR and OPNAV, and as Program Managers.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

ME2101

(4-2)

Thermodynamics

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

ME2502

(4-1)

Dynamics

NW3230

(4-0)

Strategy & Policy

AE2440

(3-2)

Intro to Digital Computation

Quarter 2

MA2043

(4-0)

Matrix and Linear Algebra

ME2601

(4-1)

Mechanics of Solids I

MS2201

(3-2)

Materials Science

Quarter 3

ME2201

(3-2)

Fluid Mechanics I

ME3611

(4-0)

Mechanics of Solids II

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

MA3232

(4-1)

Numerical Analysis

Quarter 4

TS3001

(3-2)

Fundamental Principles of Naval Architecture

ME3150

(4-1)

Heat Transfer

ME3201

(4-1)

Applied Fluid Mechanics

EO2102

(4-2)

Circuit and Power System Analysis

ME3521

(3-2)

Mechanical Vibrations

Quarter 5

TS3000

(3-2)

Electrical Power Engineering

ME2801

(3-2)

System Dynamics

ME3711

(4-1)

Design of Machine Elements

MS3202

(3-2)

Failure Analysis & Prevention

Quarter 6

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

TS3003

(3-2)

Naval Combat System Elements

ME3801

(3-2)

Dynamics and Control of Marine and Autonomous Vehicles I

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Specialization Elective

Quarter 7

TS4000

(3-2)

Naval Combat System Design

TS4001

(2-4)

Design of Naval Engineering Subsystems

ME3450

(3-2)

Computational Methods in Mechanical Engineering

ME4XXX

(V-V)

Specialization Elective

Quarter 8

TS4002

(2-4)

Ship Design Integration

ME3240

(4-2)

Marine Power and Propulsion

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 9

TS4003

(2-4)

Total Ship Systems Engineering

MS3606

(3-2)

Introduction to Welding and Joining Metallurgy

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

ME0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Naval/Mechanical Engineering - Curriculum 570
Subspecialty Code: 5601P

Officers entering into the Naval/Mechanical Engineering curriculum will be offered the necessary preparatory level courses to enable them to satisfy the equivalent of a baccalaureate degree in Mechanical Engineering. They shall meet, as a minimum, the requirements set forth by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. At the graduate level, the officer will acquire the competence to participate in technical aspects of naval systems research, design, development, maintenance and acquisition. The background to deal with future advances is gained through the emphasis on design and a combination of the core program requirements, specialization and thesis research. In pursuit of the above, the goal is for each officer to acquire a senior/upper division level physical and analytical understanding of the topics below. It is recognized that all students may not meet all ESRs, depending on individual circumstances determined by the Program Officer and the academic associate. However, each student will be exposed to fundamentals in all ESR areas.

  1. Thermodynamics and Heat Transfer: Fundamentals of thermodynamics and heat transfer with applications to all marine engineering power cycles, as well as propulsion and auxiliary system cycle analysis and design.
  2. Fluid Mechanics: Compressible and incompressible flow, both viscous and inviscid, with emphasis on propellers, cavitation, and design of shipboard fluid systems (e.g., fluid machinery, pumps, turbo-machinery).
  3. Dynamics and Control: Kinematics and dynamics of particle, rigid-body and multi-body mechanical systems. Modeling and simulation of engineering systems with mechanical, electrical and hydraulic components. Feedback control concepts, both frequency response and time domain, with applications to the design of component, platform, and weapon systems. Control of systems with continuous, discrete and combined logic states. Navigation and control for single and network-centric systems. Design of intelligent systems for machinery monitoring and automation, as well as autonomous vehicle operations.
  4. Structural Mechanics and Vibration: Statically determinant and indeterminate structural analysis, stress/strain analysis, buckling and fatigue. Shock and vibration response of marine structures, including surface ships and submarines.
  5. Materials and Fabrication: Metallurgical processes and transformations; analytical approach to failure of materials in Naval Engineering use and a basic understanding of the materials technology associated with welding and marine corrosion; an introduction to the developing fields of composites and superconducting materials.
  6. Computers: A basic understanding of computer system architecture, operating systems (such as UNIX), networking and introduction to engineering software design. Practical experience of structured programming languages (such as FORTRAN, C), and the use of integrated design tools for computational and symbolic manipulation (such as MATLAB and Maple). Use and application of mainframe, workstation and personal computers for the solution of naval engineering design and analysis tasks. Exposure to finite element and finite difference tools and techniques, with application to the thermo-fluid and structural mechanics/dynamics areas, including experience with representative software packages.
  7. Mathematics: Sufficient mathematics, including integral transforms and numerical analysis, to achieve the desired graduate education.
  8. Design/Synthesis: Design synthesis and introduction to optimization techniques, with emphasis on the design of mechanical subsystems and their integration into the ship system.
  9. Electrical Engineering: Electromagnetic and circuit theories, DC circuits, steady-state AC circuits, methods of circuit analysis, including Laplace transforms. Exposure to the construction and operating characteristics of rotating machinery, static converters, and power distribution systems and multiphased circuits.
  10. Naval Architecture: Fundamentals of naval architecture including the geometry, hydrostatics and hydrodynamics of monohull floating and submerged structures. Wave and skin friction analysis, power requirements of particular designs. Longitudinal and transverse stability of floating and submerged bodies, hull girder strength requirements. Introduction to sea keeping and survivability principles.
  11. Specialization: Through additional graduate level courses and their associated prerequisites, each officer will also acquire technical competence in one or more of the following areas: thermal/fluid sciences, solid and structural mechanics, dynamics and controls, material science, or total ship systems engineering.
  12. Joint and Maritime Strategic Planning: American and world military history and joint and maritime planning, including the origins and evolution of national and allied strategy; current American and allied military strategies which address the entire spectrum of conflict; the U.S. maritime component of national military strategy; the organizational structure of the U.S. defense establishment; the role of the commanders of unified and specified commands in strategic planning, the process of strategic planning; joint and service doctrine, and the roles and missions of each in meeting national strategy.
  13. Thesis: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research in the area of Naval/Mechanical Engineering, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of a thesis and command-oriented briefing appropriate to this curriculum.

Naval Reactors-Mechanical/Electrical Engineering Program - Curriculum 571

Primary Consultant

Ms. Becky Martini

Director, Management and Administration

Naval Sea Systems Command

NAVSEA 08B-MA Attn B. Martini

1240 Isaac Hull Ave SE Stop 8015

Washington Navy Yard, DC 20376-8015

(202) 781-6004

Academic Associate for Electrical Engineering

Monique P. Fargues, Ph.D.

Code EC/Fa, Spanagel Hall, Room 456

(831) 656-2859, DSN 756-2859

fargues@nps.edu

Academic Associate for Mechanical Engineering

Joshua H. Gordis, Ph.D.

Code ME/Go, Watkins Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2866, DSN 756-2866, FAX (831) 656-2238

jgordis@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The objective of this special program is to provide both naval officers and civilian employees of Naval Reactors (NR), an advanced education leading to a Master of Science in Engineering Science with major in either Mechanical or Electrical Engineering. This is a non-thesis program for individuals who work as engineers and who wish to pursue a master's degree via Distance Learning. The program sponsor is NAVSEA and the subject matter expert is SEA-08.

Requirements for Entry

Entrance into this program is restricted to individuals who have successfully completed the Bettis Reactor Engineering School (BRES). Further requirements include an Academic Profile Code of 121. All entrants must be nominated for the program by the designated program coordinator and primary consultant for Naval Reactors. The nomination to the Director of Admissions must include original transcripts of the student's undergraduate and BRES records. The Director of Admissions will provide copies of all records to the Academic Associate in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering depending on the degree the student is pursuing.

Entry Date

Students usually enter this program at the beginning of the academic quarter following completion of the BRES. Application for entry is to be made through the program coordinator and primary consultant for Naval Reactors. The program is also available to civilian employees of Naval Reactors who have completed BRES. For further information, contact the Academic Associate, or the Primary Consultant for this program.

Degree Requirements for Mechanical Engineering

The student must complete 20 hours of advanced graduate level (ME4XXX) NPS courses. This requirement may be met by completing a sequence of five courses via Distance Learning in a program approved by the Chairman of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. There are two (2) technical tracks, one in the Fluids, Thermal, and Propulsion area and the other in Solids, Structures, and Vibrations. A minimum of four (4) of the courses must be from one track or the other. This Master of Science in Engineering Science (Major in Mechanical Engineering) program may be completed in five academic quarters following completion of BRES.

Degree Requirements for Electrical Engineering

The student must complete 28 hours of graduate level (EC3XXX and EC4XXX) NPS courses. This requirement may be met by completing a sequence of seven courses via Distance Learning in a program approved by the Chairman of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. This Master of Science in Engineering Science (Major in Electrical Engineering) program may be completed in seven academic quarters following completion of BRES.

Credit for Completion of BRES

This program is designed to build upon the BRES courses and the power plant design experience. The following BRES courses are considered as integral to this program and equivalent to 16 credit hours of ME3XXX level NPS courses:

In addition, BRES 370 Reactor and Power Plant Design Project is considered partially in lieu of a thesis.

The NPS transcript will include 16 credits for the BRES program. The Quality Point Rating (QPR) for the NPS transcript will be computed based only on the NPS courses completed by the student.

Subspecialty

Graduates of BRES earn a Navy Subspecialty Code of 5200, which applies to their reactor design training. This Naval Postgraduate School curriculum will not affect that subspecialty code nor provide any additional subspecialty code(s).

Typical Course of Study

Upon entry into the program students will typically enroll in one course per quarter, to be taken via Distance Learning. All requirements must be completed within three calendar years from entry. Students will select a program of study from available courses and submit a program for approval by the Chairman of Mechanical or Electrical Engineering.

ME4161

(4-0)

Conduction Heat Transfer

ME4162

(4-0)

Convection Heat Transfer

ME4220

(4-0)

Viscous Flow

ME4522

(4-0)

Finite Element Methods in Structural Dynamics

ME4525

(4-0)

Ship Shock and Vibration

ME4550

(4-0)

Random Vibrations and Spectral Analysis

ME4612

(4-0)

Advanced Solid Mechanics

ME4613

(4-0)

The Finite Element Method

ME4731

(4-0)

Engineering Optimization

Educational Skill Requirements (ESRs)
Reactors - Mechanical or Electrical Engineering Program - Curriculum 571
Subspecialty Code: None

The ESRs required by Naval Reactors are met upon completion of the BRES. This is a degree program only, leading to the Master of Science in Engineering Science with Major in Mechanical or Electrical Engineering.

Distance Learning Program in Mechanical Engineering for Nuclear Trained Officers - Curriculum 572

Primary Consultant

Ms. Becky Martini

Director, Management and Administration

Naval Sea Systems Command

NAVSEA 08B-MA Attn B. Martini

1240 Isaac Hull Ave SE Stop 8015

Washington Navy Yard, DC 20376-8015

(202) 781-6004

Academic Associate

Joshua H. Gordis, Ph.D.

Code ME/Go, Watkins Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-2866, DSN 756-2866, FAX (831) 656-2238

jgordis@nps.edu

NPS Distant Learning Office, PACNORWEST

2000 Thresher Ave., Room G-101

Silverdale, WA 98215

(360) 315-2803; FAX (360) 315-2516

msesmedl@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This special program provides the opportunity for nuclear trained naval officers (those who have successfully completed Naval Nuclear Power School, Officers Course) to obtain a Master of Science in Engineering Science with a major in Mechanical Engineering - MSES(ME), while on deployment. This is a non-thesis program, but a capstone research or design project is required, along with a presentation, which is generally done via VTC or Video. This is a distance learning program, with content offered via two-way video at the Trident Training Facility in Bangor, WA or via streaming video, selected courses are available as asynchronous packages, and other DL or resident courses available through partner institutions, as described below. For more information, see: www.nps.edu/mae/dl/nuc.

Requirements for Entry

Admission into this program is restricted to individuals who have successfully completed the Officer's Course at the Naval Nuclear Power School (NNPS). Further requirements include a minimum Academic Profile Code of 323 and a B.S. in Engineering . All entrants must be nominated by their commands. The nomination to the Director of Admissions must include original transcripts of the student's undergraduate records.

Entry Date

Students may enter this program in any quarter. However, specific courses are subject to availability.

Degree Requirements for Mechanical Engineering

NPS courses may be taken via VTC or streaming video, or special asynchronous courses packages have been develop so that this program may be completed while you are deployed. In addition up to twelve (12) equivalent quarter-credits can be obtained from a partner institution, which currently include the University of Washington (UWa) and Georgia Tech (GT). Graduate courses from GT/UWa are generally considered to be ME4000 level equivalents. The final two (2) quarters are devoted to a capstone research or design project and presentation, and the student must register for ME0810 during these quarters. A degree plan must be submitted and pre-approved by the Chairman of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. This special program fully considers the 28.5 quarter credits earned in NNPS, and therefore none of these credits may be used to fulfill the degree requirements. This program may be completed in two (2) years.

Subspecialty

This is a degree program only and does not provide an additional subspecialty code.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

ME3201

(4-1)

Applied Fluid Mechanics (Asynchronous)

Quarter 2

ME3150

(4-1)

Heat Transfer (Asynchronous)

Quarter 3

ME4220

(4-0)

Viscous Flow (Asynchronous)

Quarter 4

ME4162

(4-0)

Convection Heat Transfer (Asynchronous)

Quarter 5

ME4161

(4-0)

Conduction Heat Transfer (Asynchronous)

Quarter 6

 

 

 

ME 4420

(4-0)

Marine Power and Propulsion (Asynchronous)

Quarter 7

ME0810

(0-8)

Research/Design Paper

Quarter 8

ME0810

(0-8)

Research/Design Paper

U.S. Naval Test Pilot School/Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Program – Curriculum 613

Primary Consultant

Mr. John O’Connor

Chief of Academics

U.S. Naval Test Pilot School

22783 Cedar Point Rd., Unit 21

Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Division

Patuxent River, MD 20670-1160

(301) 757-5044

Academic Associate for Aerospace Engineering

Christopher M. Brophy, Ph.D.

Code MAE, Watkins Hall, Room 312

(831) 656-2699, DSN 756-2699

cmbrophy@nps.edu

Program Officer

Jason W. Pratt, CDR

Code 71, Bullard Hall, Room 203

(831) 656-7517, DSN 756-7517

jwpratt@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The objective of this special program is to provide an opportunity for graduates of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS), who are trained in aircraft, rotorcraft, and airborne systems flight test, to obtain a Master of Science in Engineering Science with a major in Aerospace Engineering – MSES(AE). This is a distance learning program building upon the USNTPS academic and flight test instruction, with the student's USNTPS final flight test project and report serving in lieu of a thesis, and will provide advanced aerospace engineering knowledge to the test pilot and flight test engineer. NPS instruction will include advanced aerodynamics, aircraft structures, stability and control, and propulsion, and may also include systems engineering, autonomous vehicles, and air vehicle survivability. Instruction in flight system testing from the USNTPS as well as advanced graduate education in aerospace engineering topics from the NPS will qualify graduates of this program to participate in all technical aspects of naval air weapon systems acquisition.

Requirements for Entry

Entrance into this program is restricted to graduates of the U.S. Naval Test Pilot School (USNTPS) Main Curriculum, currently a 48-week program. Further requirements include an Academic Profile Code of 323. All entrants must be nominated for the program by the designated program coordinator and the primary consultant for USNTPS. The nomination to the Director of Admissions must include official transcripts from all undergraduate and graduate institutions attended plus USNTPS records. The Director of Admissions will provide copies of all records to the Academic Associate in Aerospace Engineering.

Entry Date

Students usually enter this program at the beginning of the academic quarter following graduation from USNTPS. Application for entry is to be made through the program coordinator and primary consultant for USNTPS. For further information, contact the Academic Associate, or the Primary Consultant for this program.

Degree Requirements for Aerospace Engineering

The student must complete 24 credit hours of advanced graduate level NPS (AE/ME/MS/SE 3000- and 4000-level) courses, with a minimum of 12 of the 24 hours at the 4000-level. This requirement may be met by completing a sequence of six courses via Distance Learning in a program approved by the Chairman of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. This Master of Science in Engineering Science (Major in Aerospace Engineering) program may be completed in six academic quarters following USNTPS graduation.

Credit for Completion of U.S. Naval Test Pilot School

This program is designed to build upon the USNTPS academic instruction and final flight test project and report. The following USNTPS courses are considered as integral to this program and equivalent to 6 credit hours of ME/AE 3000- level and 8 credit hours of ME/AE 4000- level NPS courses:

USNTPS MM503 Dynamic Systems Analysis Techniques

USNTPS PP501 Thermodynamics

USNTPS PP801 Propulsion Systems

USNTPS SC507 Airplane Stability and Control

USNTPS SC604 Airplane Dynamics

USNTPS SC502 Helicopter Rotor Systems

USNTPS AP501 Helicopter Performance and Aerodynamics

USNTPS SC506 Helicopter Stability and Control

USNTPS SY503 Airborne Navigation Systems

USNTPS SY601 Airborne Electro-optical Systems

In addition, the USNTPS DT-II flight test project and report is considered in lieu of a thesis. The NPS transcript will include 14 credits for the USNTPS program. The Quality Point Rating (QPR) for the NPS transcript will be computed based only on the NPS courses completed by the student.

Subspecialty

Graduates of USNTPS earn a Navy Subspecialty Code of 5403 which applies to their flight test training. This Naval Postgraduate School curriculum will not affect that subspecialty code nor provide any additional subspecialty code(s).

Typical Course of Study

Upon entry into the program students will typically enroll in one course per quarter to be taken via distance learning. All requirements must be completed within three calendar years from entry. The program of study for each student will be submitted for approval by the Chairman of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering. A typical course sequence would include:

Core Courses:

AE4452

4-1

Advanced Missile Propulsion

ME3205

4-1

Missile Aerodynamics

ME3611

4-0

Mechanics of Solids II

ME4703

4-1

Missile Flight Dynamics and Control

ME4704

3-2

Missile Design

Other Courses:

SE3100

3-2

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

ME4751

4-1

Combat Survivability, Reliability, and Systems Safety Engineering

ME3720

3-2

Introduction to Unmanned Systems

MS3202

3-2

Properties, Performance and Failure of Engineering Materials

MS3202

3-2

Properties, Performance and Failure of Engineering Materials

Educational Skill Requirements (ESRs)

USNTPS – Aerospace Engineering Program – Curriculum 613

Subspecialty Code: None

The ESRs required by the Naval Air Systems Command are met upon graduation from USNTPS. This is a degree program only, leading to the Master of Science in Engineering Science with Major in Aerospace Engineering.

Department of Meteorology

Chairman

Wendell A. Nuss, Ph.D.

Code MR/Nu, Root Hall, Room 273

(831) 656-2308, DSN 756-2308

nuss@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Qing Wang, Ph.D.

Code MR/Qg, Root Hall, Room 231

(831) 656-7716, DSN 756-7716

qwang@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Curricular Matters

Patrick A. Harr, Ph.D.

Code MR/, Root Hall, Room 244

(831) 656-3787, DSN 756-3787

paharr@nps.edu

Hway-Jen Chen, Research Associate (2000); M.S., University of California - Los Angeles, 1993.

Philip A. Durkee, Professor and Dean GSEAS (1984); Ph.D., Colorado State University, 1984.

Paul A. Frederickson, Research Associate (1999); M.S., University of Maryland, 1989.

Peter S. Guest, Research Professor (1992); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1992.

Patrick A. Harr, Professor and Associate Chair for Curricula Matters (1989); M.S., Colorado State University, 1978; Ph.D. Naval Postgraduate School, 1993.

Mary S. Jordan, Research Associate (1999); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1985.

Michael T. Montgomery, Professor (2006); Ph.D., Harvard, 1986.

Richard W. Moore, Research Assistant Professor (2008); Ph.D., Colorado State University, 2004.

James T. Murphree, Research Associate Professor (1991); Ph.D., University of California at Davis, 1989.

Kurt E. Nielsen, Research Associate (1999); M.S., University of Oklahoma, 1988.

Wendell A. Nuss, Professor and Department Chair (1986); Ph.D., University of Washington, 1986.

Andrew Penny, Research Associate (2009); M.S. University of Arizona.

Barbara V. Scarnato, Assistant Professor (2012); Ph.D. ETH, 2007.

Qing Wang, Professor and Associate Chair for Research (1995); Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 1993.

Professors Emeriti:

Chih-Pei Chang, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1972); Ph.D., University of Washington, 1972.

Kenneth L. Davidson, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1970.

Russell L. Elsberry, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1968); Ph.D., Colorado State University, 1968.

Robert L. Haney, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1971.

Robert J. Renard, Distinguished Professor Emeritus (1952); Ph.D., Florida State University, 1970.

Carlyle H. Wash, Professor Emeritus (1980); Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, 1978.

Forest Williams, Senior Lecturer Emeritus (1975); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1962; M.S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1972.

Roger T. Williams, Professor (1968); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1963.

Willem van der Bijl, Professor , Ph.D. (1961), State University, Utrecht, Netherlands, 1952

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Brief Overview

The Department of Meteorology's history dates back to the 1940s when it was part of the Postgraduate Department at the Naval Academy. The department's academic function is interdisciplinary in nature in that it supports separate Master of Science Degree programs: Meteorology, Meteorology and Physical Oceanography, and Oceanography; and, provides courses for the Space Systems, Undersea Warfare, Information/Electronic Warfare, and Joint Command, Control, Communications, Computers and Intelligence (C4I) curricula. Offerings in the Special Operations and Joint Warfare Analysis are under development.

Department academic strengths include air/ocean dynamics and numerical modeling and prediction, structure and dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, satellite remote sensing and its applications and synoptic meteorology, including analysis and prediction in tropical, mid-latitude, and polar regions in both hemispheres. More than forty courses are offered in meteorology, primarily at the graduate level. The department has fourteen faculty (7 tenure track, 7 non-tenure track, 2 military, and 7 emeritus), with graduate student participation as research-team members through the M.S. thesis and Ph.D. dissertation process. The current areas of research concentration encompass numerical and analytic air/ocean modeling and prediction, tropical meteorology (including monsoon circulations and tropical cyclone dynamics and forecasting), coastal meteorology and oceanography, climate dynamics, marine boundary layer studies with emphasis on air/sea interactions and electromagnetic/optic propagation, remote sensing/satellite meteorology and a wide range of synoptic studies (e.g., regional studies, maritime cyclogenesis, short range forecasting, and numerical-model verification). The Ph.D. program in the department is active with Navy officers, Air Force officers, DoD civilians and international officers among its recent graduates.

Degree

A student is able to earn an academic degree listed below while enrolled in Meteorology (Curriculum 372) and Meteorology and Oceanography (Curriculum 373).

Master of Science in Meteorology

Entrance to a program leading to a Master of Science in Meteorology degree requires a baccalaureate degree with completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and a minimum of one year of college physics.

The Master of Science in Meteorology degree requires completion of:

  1. Necessary prerequisite courses in mathematics (through partial differential equations) and meteorology,
  2. The sequence of core courses in the fields of dynamical, numerical, physical and synoptic meteorology,
  3. An approved selection of graduate elective courses,
  4. An acceptable thesis.

The total number of quarter-hours in (2) and (3) above must be at least 36. These 36 hours must include 18 quarter-hours at the 4000 level in courses other than directed study.

Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

Direct entrance to a program leading to the Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography degree requires a baccalaureate degree in one of the physical sciences, mathematics or engineering. This normally permits the validation of a number of required undergraduate courses such as physics, differential equations, linear algebra, vector analysis, and various courses in meteorology and/or oceanography which are prerequisites to the graduate program. These prerequisites may be taken at the Naval Postgraduate School; however, in that event, the program may be lengthened by one or more quarters.

The Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography degree requires completion of:

  1. Necessary prerequisite courses in mathematics (through partial differential equations), meteorology, and physical oceanography,
  2. The sequence of core courses in the fields of dynamical, numerical, physical and synoptic meteorology and oceanography,
  3. An approved selection of graduate elective courses in meteorology and oceanography,
  4. A significant educational experience in the field using instruments.
  5. An acceptable thesis on a topic approved by the department.

The total number of quarter-hours in (2) and (3) above must be at least 48. These 48 hours must include 20 hours at the 4000 level in courses other than directed study, and they should show an approximate balance between the disciplines of meteorology and oceanography.

Dual Degree in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

The Meteorology and Oceanography Departments have adopted a policy to not recommend the award of dual master's degrees in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Ph.D. program is offered in the Department of Meteorology in the following areas of study: numerical weather prediction, geophysical fluid dynamics, boundary-layer meteorology, analysis of atmospheric systems and tropical meteorology.

The requirements for the degree are grouped into three categories: course work, research in conjunction with an approved dissertation and examination in both the major and, if elected, a minor field. The minor field is usually in physical oceanography, mathematics or physics.

The Department of Meteorology also may require a preliminary examination to show evidence of acceptability as a doctoral student.

Prospective students should consult with the Chairman of the Department of Meteorology for further guidance regarding doctoral programs.

Laboratories

As described below, the department is served by four major laboratory facilities: An interactive computer lab, a synoptic meteorology lab, a meteorological measurements lab, and a tactical applications lab.

The Interactive Digital Environmental Analysis (IDEA) Laboratory, which is shared with Oceanography, provides real-time acquisition and analysis of conventional and remotely-sensed data in support of the synoptic and physical meteorology and oceanography programs. The laboratory consists of 22 image analysis and graphics workstations. The laboratory accesses real-time GOES, NOAA, Navy (FNMOC), and DMSP data for use in instruction and research.

The department has developed a modern Synoptic Analysis and Forecasting Laboratory which receives environmental products and observations for instruction on the preparation of real-time weather analyses and forecasts. Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (FNMOC) and the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) weather analysis and forecast products are received through a variety of channels that include UNIDATA and the World-Wide Web. UNIX workstations and PC-based systems provide multiple software capabilities for displaying, animating, and visualizing current weather observations, satellite images, radar observations, and numerical model products obtained from FNMOC, NCEP or generated locally.

The Marine Atmospheric Measurements Laboratory utilizes in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation systems for both teaching and research. Instrumentation includes: A 404 MHz and 915 MHz Doppler radar wind profiler with radio acoustic sounding system (RASS); rawinsonde systems with GPS navigational aids; a laser ceilometer; and a fully instrumented surface weather station. Access to other instrumentation (measuring turbulent fluxes, aerosols, etc.), measuring platforms (research vessel, buoys, and remotely piloted aircraft) and data from a variety of networked local measurement sites enables the laboratory to provide near “real-time” data from the coastal region.

Meteorology Course Descriptions

MR Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<MR Courses MR0001-MR3321>

MR0001 Meteorology and Oceanography Colloquium (0-1) As Required

(No credit.) Departmental lecture series covering topics of current interest by NPS and outside guest speakers. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: none.

MRR210 Refresher, Introduction to Meteorology/Lab (No Credit) Meets last six weeks of quarter (4-2) As Required

An introductory course that treats the composition and structure of the atmosphere, thermodynamic processes, forces and related small- and large-scale motions, air masses fronts, tropical cyclones, solar and terrestrial radiation, general circulation and weather forecasting. Additionally, laboratory periods are included to illustrate lecture material, including surface and airways communication codes, pressure and streamline/ isotach analyses, introduction to mid-latitude and tropical analyses by the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) over oceanic regions, plus satellite interpretation.

MR0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course.

MR0999 Seminar in Meteorology (No Credit) (2-0) As Required

Students present results of thesis or other approved research investigation. Prerequisites: Concurrent preparation of thesis or other acceptable research paper.

MR2020 Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences (2-2) As Required

Introduction to the programming languages, operating systems, and computing facilities which METOC students use in MR and OC courses. Laboratory assignments are elementary problems in oceanography and meteorology. Prerequisites: Calculus and college physics.

MR2200 Introduction to Meteorology (4-0) As Required

An introductory course that treats the composition and structure of the atmosphere, thermodynamic processes, forces and related small-and large-scale motions, air masses, fronts, tropical cyclones, solar and terrestrial radiation, general circulation and weather forecasting. Prerequisites: Department approval.

MR2210 Introduction to Meteorology/Laboratory (4-2) As Required

Same course as MR2200 plus laboratory periods illustrating lecture material, including Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) analysis over oceanic areas, plus satellite imagery interpretation. Prerequisites: Department approval.

MR2230 Meteorology, Oceanography, and Military Operations (4-0) As Required

This course is an introduction to meteorology and oceanography (METOC) from a military operations perspective. The course examines the basic patterns and processes of the atmosphere and ocean, and their impacts on the planning and conducts of military.

MR2262 Elements of Weather Forecasting (1-2) As Required

Survey of subjective and objective methods of atmospheric prognosis. Weather briefings illustrate applications of forecasting principles and use of satellite imagery. Prerequisites: MR3222, MR3230 or consent of instructor.

MR2416 Meteorology for Electronic Warfare (2-0) As Required

A survey of environmental factors affecting the propagation and attenuation of electromagnetic waves. Synoptic and climatological conditions associated with anomalous refraction are studied. Ionospheric phenomena associated with longer wavelength (Hf) propagation. Layers associated with high aerosol concentration and optical turbulence are identified. Hands-on experience with existing environmental effects assessment models. Prerequisites: Differential and integral calculus (may be taken concurrently).

MR2520 Survey of Air-Ocean Remote Sensing (3-0) As Required

Overview of systems for remote sensing of the atmosphere and oceans from space, and operational applications. Prerequisites: Undergraduate physics and calculus or consent of instructor.

MR3140 Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Science (3-2) Summer/Winter

Basic probability and statistics, in the air-ocean science context with emphasis on techniques of statistical data analysis. Histograms, boxplots, empirical distributions and associated characteristics such as moments and percentiles. Structure of a probability model, density distribution function, expectation and variance. Binomial, Poisson and Gaussian distributions. Conditional probability and independence. Joint distributions, covariance and central limit theorem. Standard tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals for both one-and two-parameter situations. Regression analysis as related to least squares estimation. Prerequisites: Calculus.

MR3150 Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series (3-2) As Required

Analysis methods for atmospheric and oceanic time series. Fourier transforms applied to linear systems and discrete data. Correlation functions, power density spectra and cospectra. Optimal design of air-ocean data networks. Laboratory work involves analysis of actual atmospheric and oceanic time series using principles developed in class. Prerequisites: A probability and statistics course.

MR3212 Polar Meteorology/Oceanography (4-0) As Required

Operational aspects of arctic and antarctic meteorology. Polar oceanography. Sea-ice: amount, its seasonal distribution, melting and freezing processes, physical and mechanical properties, drift and predictions. Prerequisites: OC3240, MR3222 or consent of instructor.

MR3220 Meteorological Analysis (4-0) As Required

Techniques of evaluation, interpretation and analysis of pressure, wind, temperature and moisture data, including weather satellite observations, with emphasis on the low and middle troposphere. Synoptic models of extratropical vortices, waves and frontal systems, with emphasis on three-dimensional space structure and time continuity, including isentropic surfaces and vertical cross-section analysis. Introduction to analysis in the troposphere and low stratosphere, including daily exposure to Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System (NOGAPS) analysis, and satellite imagery interpretation. Prerequisites: MR3420 or MR3480, MR/OC3321.

MR3222 Meteorological Analysis/Laboratory (4-3) Spring/Fall

Same as MR3220, plus laboratory sessions in the IDEA lab on the concepts considered in the lectures, with emphasis on the analysis of the low and middle troposphere, streamline and isotach analysis techniques, satellite interpretation, and vertical cross-section analyses. Prerequisites: MR3420 or MR3480, MR/OC3321.

MR3230 Tropospheric and Stratospheric Meteorology (4-0) As Required

Development and application of conceptual models of the evolution of various tropospheric and stratospheric circulation systems. Extratropical cyclones, jet streams and fronts are examined through application of dynamical concepts with particular emphasis on aspects associated with the marine environment. Prerequisites: MR3222, MR4322 (may be taken concurrently).

MR3234 Tropospheric and Stratospheric Meteorology/Laboratory (4-4) Spring/Fall

Same as MR3230 plus laboratory sessions utilizing the IDEA Lab to facilitate the physical understanding of dynamical relationships inherent to the conceptual models of the various weather systems. Exercises utilize various case studies including material from recent marine cyclogenesis field experiments. Prerequisites: MR3222, MR4322, (may be taken concurrently).

MR3240 Radar Meteorology (3-0) As Required

Principles of radar meteorology. Topics covered include radar systems, meteorological radar equation, doppler radar basics, propagation, attenuation, precipitation and velocity estimation, and characteristic echoes. Prerequisites: MR3222 and MR3522.

MR3250 Tropical Meteorology (3-0) As Required

Structure and mechanisms of synoptic-scale wave disturbances, cloud clusters, upper-tropospheric systems, the intertropical convergence zone; structure, development and motion of tropical cyclones; monsoon circulations. Emphasis on analysis and energetics. Prerequisites: MR4322 and MR3230 or MR3234 (may be taken concurrently).

MR3252 Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory (3-4) Summer/Winter

Same as MR3250 plus laboratory sessions on analysis of tropical systems emphasizing streamline and isotach analysis and incorporating aircraft and satellite observations. Exercises stress tropical cyclone regimes. Satellite imagery is used as an analysis tool and also in forecasting tropical cyclone intensity. A track forecasting exercise provides an exposure to the use of various dynamic, climatological and statistical forecast models. Prerequisites: MR4322 and MR3230 or MR3234 (may be taken concurrently).

MR3260 Operational Atmospheric Prediction (3-0) As Required

Subjective and objective methods of atmospheric prognosis and techniques for forecasting operationally-important weather elements from surface to 100 mb. Interpretation, use and systematic errors of computer-generated products. Weather satellite briefs and applications of forecasting principles to current situations. Prerequisites: MR3230, or MR3234; MR/OC4323 may be taken concurrently.

MR3262 Operational Atmospheric Prediction/Laboratory (3-5) Fall/Winter

Same as MR3260 plus laboratory sessions on the application of lecture material. Also, practice in weather briefing, including diagnosis and forecasting of current weather briefing, including diagnosis and forecasting of current weather situations using weather satellite observations, and Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center and National Meteorological Center products. Prerequisites: MR3230 or MR3234; MR/OC4323 may be taken concurrently.

MR3321 Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics (4-0) Spring/Fall

A foundation course for studies of atmospheric and oceanographic motions. The governing dynamical equations for rotating stratified fluids are derived from fundamental physical laws. Topics include: the continuum hypothesis, real and apparent forces, derivations and applications of the governing equations, coordinate systems, scale analysis, simple balanced flows, boundary conditions, thermal wind, barotropic and baroclinic conditions, circulation, vorticity, and divergence. Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus and vectors; ordinary differential equations (may be taken concurrently).

<MR Courses MR3413-MR3610>

MR3413 Boundary Layer Meteorology (3-0) As Required

This course covers the basic concepts, description, and quantification of the main features of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and atmospheric dispersion. The characteristics of turbulent flow will be introduced at the beginning of the course followed by a detailed discussion of the flux-profile relationship and the bulk aerodynamics surface flux parameterization for the surface layer. The course also covers the main features and dominant physical processes in the stable, clear, and convective boundary layers and an overview of the surface energy budget over various surface types. For dispersion modeling, the basic concepts of dispersion modeling and the Gaussian plume and puff models will be introduced. During the course, the statistical and dimensional analysis methods, which are the main tools to analyze the ABL observational and numerical modeling data, are introduced and used to reveal the characteristics and structure of the ABL. Prerequisites: MR3222 and MR3480.

MR3419 Assessment of Atmospheric Factors in EM/EO Propagation (2-1) As Required

The course addresses atmospheric parameters and their distribution that affect propagation of electromagnetic and Electro-optical (EM/EO) waves and describes their assessment with in situ and satellite borne sensors. It relates propagation phenomena to wavelength-dependent controlling atmospheric influences. Students receive demonstrations of obtaining web-site available atmospheric descriptions. There are demonstrations and exercises with computer-based assessment codes that relate EM/EO propagation to measured and predicted atmospheric properties: PROPHET (HF), AREPS (UHF VHF-SHF), EOTDA&NOVAM (IR). Discussions will occur on display/distribution of global atmospheric and oceanic conditions supporting specific operational systems. Satellite sensor retrieval procedures will be described and demonstrated. Prerequisites: Curricula; Calculus based physics and math through multivariable calculus; Enrollment in International Electronic Warfare and Electronics/Communication.

MR3420 Atmospheric Thermodynamics (3-0) As Required

The physical variables; the equation of state; the first law of thermodynamics and its application to the atmosphere; meteorological thermodynamic diagrams; adiabatic processes and potential temperatures; moist air processes; hydrostatic equilibrium, vertical motion in the atmosphere, stability methods and criteria. Prerequisites: Multivariable calculus.

MR3421 Cloud Physics (3-0) As Required

Basic principles of cloud and precipitation physics and application to cloud formation and optical properties. Prerequisites: MR3420 or MR3480.

MR3445 Oceanic and Atmospheric Observational Systems (2-2) As Required

Principles of measurement: sensors, data acquisition systems, calibration, etc. Methods of measurement for thermodynamic and dynamic variables in the ocean and atmosphere, including acoustics and optics. Prerequisites: OC3230 and MR3420, MR/OC3150 or consent of instructor.

MR3455 Measurement Systems for the Marine and Coastal Atmospheric Boundary Layer (2-2) As Required

The course treats a broad spectrum of measurement techniques for atmospheric dynamic and thermodynamic variables. Laboratory sessions provide hands-on experience with various state-of-the-art sensing systems, including NPS' Doppler Radar Wind Profiler. Topics include sensor static and dynamic characteristics; calibration; in situ measurements of wind, pressure, temperature, humidity, aerosols and radiation on the surface, on balloon-borne sounding systems and on aircraft; and surface-based remote sensing systems, including wind profilers, SODAR and LIDAR. Prerequisites: MR3150 and MR3222 or consent of instructor.

MR3480 Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Radiative Processes (4-1) Summer/Winter

The physical variables; the equation of state; the first law of thermodynamics and its application to the atmosphere; meteorological thermodynamic diagrams; adiabatic processes and potential temperatures; moist air process; hydrostatic equilibrium, vertical motion in the atmosphere, stability methods and criteria. Basic radiative transfer including absorption and scattering by atmospheric constituents; solar and terrestrial radiative heating; radiative energy budgets; climate change; radiative effects of clouds and aerosols; optical phenomena. Prerequisites: Single variable calculus.

MR3520 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean (4-0) As Required

Principles of radiative transfer and satellite sensors and systems; visual, infrared and microwave radiometry and radar systems; application of satellite remotely-sensed data in the measurement of atmospheric and oceanic properties. Prerequisites: Undergraduate physics and differential/integral calculus, ordinary differential equations and MR3480, or consent of instructor.

MR3522 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean/Laboratory (4-2) Summer/Winter

Same as MR3520 plus laboratory sessions on the concepts considered in the lecture series. Prerequisites: Same as MR3520.

MR3540 Radiative Processes in the Atmosphere (3-0) As Required

Applications of radiation theory to atmospheric energy budgets, general circulation and anthropogenic climate changes. Radiational imbalance at the surface leading to heat fluxes and temperature changes in atmosphere and earth. Upper atmosphere phenomena (ozonosphere and ionosphere). Radiative effects of clouds and aerosols, and optical phenomena. Prerequisites: MR3420, MR3520 or MR3522.

MR3570 Operational Oceanography and Meteorology (2-4) As Required

Experience in the field acquiring and analyzing oceanographic and atmospheric data using state-of-the-art instrumentation. Integration of satellite remote sensing and other operational products with in situ data. Includes survey of instrumentation, pre-cruise planning, operations the field and post-cruise analysis. Prerequisites: OC3240, MR3220, or consent of instructor.

MR3571 Operational Oceanography and Meteorology Lecture (2-0) As Required

Introduction to the core oceanographic and atmospheric instruments used in support of environmental monitoring and modeling. Principles of instrument design and sampling protocols will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the capabilities and limitation of autonomous platforms, on aircraft- and shore-based remote sensing, and on the major systems in place to organize and distribute environmental data. A brief introduction to data assimilation will be included to illustrate the critical link between observations and oceanic and atmospheric circulation models. Prerequisite: OC3230 or consent of instructor.

MR3572 Operational Oceanography and Meteorology Lab (0-4) As Required

This course is intended to insure a flexible hands-on experience deploying equipment in a realistic environment. Students will be required to design their individual field programs working with the instructor and the curriculum's program officer. Approved programs include: 1) design and implementation of coastal ocean or atmosphere sampling protocols using unmanned vehicles, 2) design and implementation of monitoring plans for the surf zone or estuarine environments (in this case OC4210 may be taken as an alternative), 3) design and implementation of sampling protocols for the atmosphere using fixed-location or aircraft-based sensors, 4) design of and participation in upper-ocean or lower-atmosphere sampling protocols at polar ice camps, and 5) design of and participation in deep-water surveys onboard ocean-going research vessels using NPS vessel time or faculty-mentored cruises of opportunity. Prerequisite: MR3571 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

MR3610 Modern Climatology (4-0) Summer

An introduction to physical climatology and its applications. This course examines Earth's climate system, especially major long-term global and regional patterns, and the physical processes that create them, with focus on the application of physical climatology to solve operational DoD problems and analyze and forecast climate variations at intraseasonal and longer time scales. Emphasis placed on support of military operations, past, present and future. Prerequisites: MR2200, MR/OC3321 and MR3480.

<MR Courses MR4234-MR5810>

MR4234 Advanced Topics in Mid-Latitude Weather Systems (4-0) As Required

The course examines the classic conceptual models of mid-latitude weather systems and their associated dynamics. From this classic perspective, recent advances in our theoretical and observational understanding of cyclones and fronts are examined to extend our conceptual models of mid-latitude weather systems over a broad range of scales. It is expected that students have a working knowledge of the quasigeostrophic dynamics of cyclones, fronts, and jet streaks as taught in MR3234 (Trop and Strat) and MR4322 (Dynamic Met) or their equivalents. Prerequisites: MR3234 and MR4322 or similar undergraduate course on mid-latitude weather systems.

MR4240 Coastal Meteorology (3-1) Spring

Mesoscale circulations of the coastal atmosphere are examined from theoretical, observational, and model perspectives. Thermally-driven circulations, orographically-driven circulations and mesoscale circulations due to the interaction of synoptic-scale weather systems with coastlines are studied to develop useful conceptual models of coastal meteorological phenomena. Prerequisites: MR4322, MR3234 taken concurrently or consent of instructor.

MR4241 Mesoscale Meteorology (3-0) As Required

Descriptive and physical understanding of subsynoptic-scale weather systems including fronts, squall lines, mesoscale convective systems, tornadoes, etc., and their relation to the synoptic-scale environment. Applications to short-range and local-area forecasting utilizing satellite and numerical-model products relevant to mesoscale weather phenomena. Prerequisites: MR3230, MR4322 with consent of instructor.

MR4242 Advanced Tropical Meteorology (3-0) As Required

Theories and observations of tropical motion systems. Equatorial wave theory; stratospheric biennial oscillation; tropical intraseasonal oscillations; monsoon circulations; tropospheric biennial oscillation; El Nino and Southern Oscillation; other climate variations. Tropical cyclone dynamics; influence of environmental flow on formation and motion; advanced models and forecasting of tropical motion. Emphases among these topics will depend on the interest of the students. Prerequisites: MR3252 or consent of instructor.

MR4250 Atmospheric General Circulation (3-0) As Required

The observed circulation. Zonal mean and eddy motions. Balances of momentum, heat and moisture. Energetics. Maintenance of circulation. Zonally asymmetric circulations. Other selected topics of the general circulation of the atmosphere. Prerequisites: MR4322 and consent of instructor.

MR4262 Advanced Meteorological Prediction (3-2) As Required

The course requires previous weather forecast experience and covers advanced forecasting topics. A sample of topics covered include dust forecasting, orographic precipitation, mountain waves and downslope winds, cold-air damming and coastal frontogenesis, marine fog and stratus, ocean wind waves and swell, thunderstorms, and others. The focus is on the mesoscale aspects of forecasting and how to appropriately use observational and model tools for short-range to longer range forecasts of these phenomena. Hands-on practical forecast labs and briefings are used to demonstrate and practice the theory and techniques covered in the lectures. Prerequisites: Experience equivalent to completion of MR3262, MR3234 and MR3522.

MR4322 Dynamic Meteorology (4-0) Summer/Fall

Pressure coordinates, quasi-geostrophic scale analysis, perturbation method; solutions of equations of motion for sound, gravity and synoptic waves; baroclinic and barotropic instability; energetics; geostrophic adjustment. Prerequisites: MR3420, MR/OC3321, calculus and ordinary differential equations.

MR4323 Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling (4-2) Spring/Fall

Numerical models of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. Finite difference techniques for solving hyperbolic, parabolic and elliptic equations, linear and nonlinear computational instability. Spectral and finite element models. Filtered and primitive equation prediction models. Sigma coordinates. Objective analysis and initialization. Moisture and heating as time permits. Prerequisites: MR4322, OC4211, partial differential equation, MA3232 desirable.

MR4324 Ensemble Prediction Systems (2-2) As Required

Operational weather prediction is evolving from a deterministic forecasting focus, based on single-solution numerical weather prediction (NWP) output, to a focus on ensemble-based forecasting. This course introduces the fundamentals of chaos theory (as the scientific basis for ensemble forecasting), describes the behavior of an ideal vs. a practical ensemble, and covers details of the various components of an ensemble prediction system (EPS). The course goal is to develop weather officers knowledgeable in EPS capabilities, strengths, weaknesses, etc., so that the DOD can effectively incorporate the technology into its weather support process. Prerequisites: MR4323 or similar undergraduate course in numerical weather prediction.

MR4325 METOC for Warfighter Decision Making (3-2) Fall

This course introduces decision science in the context of utilizing deterministic vs. stochastic meteorological and oceanographic forecasts to improve strategic, operational, and tactical planning. Various aspects of generating, communicating, and applying stochastic forecasts for optimal decision making under uncertainty are explored. Prerequisites: MR/OC3140 or similar course on statistics. MR/OC4323 and MR4324 are recommended but not required.

MR4331 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Dynamics I (3-0) As Required

Advanced topics in the dynamics of the atmosphere and the oceans including scale analysis; geostrophic adjustment; dispersion, and barotropic and baroclinic instabilities. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MR4332 Advanced Geophysical Fluid Dynamics II (3-0) As Required

Normal mode and baroclinic instability; frontogenesis; boundary layer analysis with application; finite amplitude baroclinic waves; symmetric instability. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

MR4413 Air-Sea Interaction (4-0) Summer/Winter

Fundamental concepts in turbulence. The atmospheric planetary boundary layer, including surface layer and bulk formula for estimating air-sea fluxes. The oceanic planetary boundary layer including the dynamics of the well-mixed surface layer. Recent papers in air-sea interaction. Prerequisites: MR/OC3150 and OC3240 or MR4322, or consent of instructor.

MR4414 Advanced Air/Sea Interaction (3-0) As Required

Advanced topics in the dynamics of the atmospheric and oceanic planetary boundary layers. Prerequisites: MR/OC4413 or consent of instructor.

MR4415 Atmospheric Turbulence (3-0) As Required

Approaches for defining the structure of the turbulent atmospheric boundary layer. Review of statistical descriptions of atmospheric turbulence; averaging, moments, joint moments, spectral representation. Equations for turbulent regime in a stratified, shear flow. Scaling parameters and similarity theories for surface layer profiles, spectra; Kolmogorov hypotheses, Monin-Obukhov similarity theory. Measurement of atmospheric turbulence. Examination of observed spectra and scales of atmospheric turbulence. Prerequisites: MR/OC3150 or consent of instructor.

MR4416 Atmospheric Factors in Electromagnetic and Optical Propagation (3-0) Summer

Principles of microwave and optical wave propagation in the atmosphere. Effects of surface and boundary layers on propagation: refraction, scattering, attenuation, ducting, etc. Addresses existing environmental effects assessment models. Prerequisites: MR/OC4413 or MR4415 (may be taken concurrently).

MR4520 Topics in Satellite Remote Sensing (3-0) As Required

Selected topics in the advanced application of satellite remote sensing to the measurement of atmospheric and oceanic variables. Prerequisites: MR/OC3522.

MR4800 Advanced Topics in Meteorology (Variable Credit 1-0 to 4-0) (V-0) As Required

Advanced topics in various aspects of meteorology. Topics not covered in regularly offered courses. The course may be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and Department Chairman.

MR4900 Directed Study in Meteorology (Variable Credit 1-0 to 4-0) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Directed study of selected areas of meteorology to meet the needs of the individual student. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and Department Chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

MR5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

Meteorology - Curriculum 372

Program Officer

William (Bill) Sommer, CDR, USN

Code 75, Spanagel Hall, Room 304

(831) 656-2045, DSN 756-2045

wlsommer@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Patrick A. Harr, Ph.D.

Code MR, Root Hall, Room 244

(831) 656-3787, DSN 756-3787

paharr@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum will provide qualified personnel with a sound understanding of the science of meteorology. The program is designed to provide the student with:

Requirements for Entry

The master's program is open to International Officers, officers from other services, and DoD civilians. It is open to METOC (1800) officers of the U.S. Navy and officers from other services as a Ph.D. program. Students in the USAF Basic Meteorology Program (BMP) are also listed in this curriculum. The remainder of this section applies to the MS degree program.

For the master's program, a baccalaureate degree with completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and a minimum of one year of college physics is required. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry. A refresher quarter is available for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements for direct entry and is normally offered in the Summer quarter prior to 372 enrollment.

Entry Date

Meteorology is a six-quarter course of study with a normal entry date in the Fall quarter. For further information contact the Program Officer. Academic questions may be referred directly to the Academic Associate.

Degree

Master of Science in Meteorology.

Typical Course of Study

Quarter 1

MA1115 (6wks)

(4-0)

Multi-Variable Calculus

MA1116 (6wks)

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MR2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MR3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Science

MR3252

(3-4)

Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory

Quarter 2

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis

MR3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean/Lab

MR4322

(4-0)

Dynamic Meteorology

MR4413

(4-2)

Air-Sea Interaction

Quarter 3

MR3610

(4-0)

Modern Climatology

MR4234

(4-0)

Advanced Topics in Mid-Latitude Weather Systems

MR4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling

MR4900

(3-0)

Directed Study in Meteorology

Quarter 4

MR4241

(3-0)

Mesoscale Meteorology

MR4800

(3-0)

Elective in Meteorology

MR0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 5

MR4262

(3-2)

Advanced Weather Forecasting

MR4800

(3-0)

Elective in Meteorology

MR0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 6

MR4800

(3-0)

Elective in Meteorology

MR0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

MR0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR0999

(2-0)

Thesis Presentation

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Meteorology (Masters) - Curriculum 372
Subspecialty Code: Not Applicable for MS Degree

Note -This program primarily supports USAF and International graduate education, thus there is no Navy p-code or subspecialty associated with this master's program, and no official ESRs . This list describes the skills this program will provide students upon successful completion.

This curriculum will provide qualified personnel with a sound understanding of the science of meteorology. The program is designed to provide the student with:

  1. A thorough understanding of the principles governing the physical and dynamic properties of the atmosphere.
  2. The ability to observe, assimilate, analyze, interpret, and predict atmospheric parameters and conditions using field experimentation, direct and remote sensing observational techniques, statistical analyses and numerical models.
  3. A thorough understanding of the effects of atmospheric properties and conditions on weapon, sensor and platform performance, while conducting and supporting military warfare.
  4. A meteorological research experience germane to military warfare, culminating in a thesis of professional quality.

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Meteorology (Ph.D.) - Curriculum 372
Subspecialty Code: 6403D

The officer must have a thorough theoretical and functional knowledge (obtained at the doctorate level) of the principles of meteorology and its effects on naval warfare and weapons systems.

Meteorology and Oceanography (METOC) - Curriculum 373 (Under Department of Meteorology)

Program Officer

William (Bill) Sommer, CDR, USN

Code 75, Spanagel Hall, Room 304

(831) 656-2045, DSN 756-2045

wlsommer@nps.edu

Academic Associates

Ching-Sang Chiu, Ph.D. (Oceanography)

Spanagel Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-3239, DSN 756-3239

chiu@nps.edu

Patt Harr, Ph.D. (Meteorology)

Root Hall, Room 244

(831) 656-3787

paharr@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum in meteorology and oceanography involves approximately 109 quarter-hours of classroom lectures, supplemented by an additional 42 quarter-hours of laboratory exercises. This program is designed to provide the student with:

This education will enhance performance in all duties throughout a career, including operational billets, technical management assignments and policy making positions. Students will develop graduate-level technical ability based upon scientific principles, acquire diverse professional knowledge, and develop analytical ability for practical problem solving.

Requirements for Entry

This program is open to METOC (1800) Officers, officers from other services, International Officers and DoD civilians.

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sciences, mathematics or engineering is required. Completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based college physics are required. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry.

Entry Date

METOC curriculum is a nine quarter course of study with entry dates in September and March. Students approved for a refresher quarter enter in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer. Academic questions may be referred directly to either of the Academic Associates.

Degree

Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a METOC Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6401P. The Curriculum Sponsor is the Oceanographer of the Navy (CNO N2/N6E).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

METOC Officer aboard CV(N)/LHD

Submarine Group Staff

Numbered Fleet Staff

CARSTRKGRU Staff

OIC Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Detachment

NAVMETOCCOM Mobile Warfare Teams

National Geospatial Agency

Office of Naval Research

Typical Course of Study - Fall Start

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Ordinary Differential Equations

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmos. Thermodynamics & Radiative Processes

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

MR3222

(4-3)

Meteorological Analysis/Lab

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

OC3260

(4-1)

Fund. of Ocean Acoustics

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Fluid Dynamics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 4

 

 

MR4322

(4-0)

Dynamic Meteorology

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air-Sea Interaction

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 5

 

 

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air & Ocean Modeling

MR3234

(4-4)

Tropospheric & Stratospheric Meteorology/Lab

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Met & Ocean

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

MR/OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Meteorology/Oceanography

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 6

 

 

MR3252

(4-4)

Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory

MR/OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Meteorology & Oceanography

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 7

 

 

MR4240

(3-1)

Coastal Meteorology

OC4335

(4-0)

METOC Decision Theory

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 8

 

 

MR4416

(3-0)

Atmospheric Factors in EM/EO Propagation

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 9

 

 

MR3262

(3-5)

Operational Atmospheric Prediction/Laboratory

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0999

(2-0)

Theses Presentation

Typical Course of Study-Spring Start

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Analysis

MA2121

(4-0)

Ordinary Differential Equations

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmos. Thermodynamics & Radiative Processes

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

MR3222

(4-3)

Meteorological Analysis/Lab

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

OC3260

(4-1)

Fund. of Ocean Acoustics

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Fluid Dynamics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 4

 

 

MR4322

(4-0)

Dynamic Meteorology

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air-Sea Interaction

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 5

 

 

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air & Ocean Modeling

MR3234

(4-4)

Tropospheric & Stratospheric Meteorology/Lab

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

MR/OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Meteorology/Oceanography

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 6

 

 

MR3252

(4-4)

Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory

MR/OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

MR4416

(3-0)

Atmos. Factors in EM/EO Propagation

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 7

 

 

MR3262

(3-1)

Operational Atmospheric Prediction/Laboratory

MR4325

(4-0)

METOC Decision Theory

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 8

 

 

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Meteorology & Oceanography

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 9

 

 

MR4240

(3-1)

Coastal Meteorology

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0999

(2-0)

Theses Presentation

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Meteorology & Oceanography (METOC) - Curriculum 373
Subspecialty Code: 6401P

  1. Integration of Oceanic & Atmospheric Parameters: The officer must be able to observe, assimilate, analyze, and predict oceanic and littoral water conditions, and atmospheric conditions using direct and remote sensing observation techniques, statistical analysis, and numerical models. The officer will have a sound understanding of polar, mid-latitude and tropical atmospheric and oceanographic dynamics, including the impact of these region's conditions on military operations and systems.
  2. Numerical Prediction Systems: The officer will have a thorough understanding of numerical prediction systems as it applies to the physics and dynamics of the ocean and the atmosphere. This understanding should include a broad understanding of the modeling systems to include strengths, weaknesses, and vulnerabilities; the state of current models and techniques; and appropriate applications of deterministic and stochastic techniques.
  3. Ocean/Atmosphere Problem Solving: The officer must develop critical thinking skills and conduct independent analyses to solve environmentally challenging problems in the fields of Physical Oceanography and/or Meteorology as they apply to Naval/Joint operations, using modern scientific research techniques, field experience, tools, and equipment.
  4. Decision Superiority: The officer must have a thorough understanding of open-ocean and near-shore oceanographic and atmospheric dynamics and properties. The officer must have the ability to apply this knowledge to warfighter decisions using sound decision theory, taking into account available courses of action, assessments of vulnerability, uncertainty, and risk.
  5. Other NPS Requirements: The officer must successfully complete all NPS requirements for the Master's Degree in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Department of Oceanography

Chair

Peter C. Chu, Ph.D.

Code OC/CU, Spanagel Hall, Room 324

(831) 656-2673, DSN 756-2673

pcchu@nps.edu

Associate Chair, Instruction

Ching-Sang Chiu, Ph.D.

Spanagel Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-3239, DSN 756-3239

chiu@nps.edu

Associate Chair, Research

Thomas H. Herbers, Ph.D.

Code OC, Spanagel Hall, Room 331B

(831) 656-2917, DSN 756- 2917

thherber@nps.edu

Associate Chair, Operations

Keir D. Stahlhut, MS, LCDR

(831) 656-7712, DSN 756-7712

kdstahlh@nps.edu

Mary Louise Batteen, Professor (1985)*; Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1984.

Ching-Sang Chiu, Distinguished Professor and Associate Chair, Instruction (1988); Sc.D, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 1985.

Peter C. Chu, Distinguished Professor and Chair(1986); Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1985.

Jacqueline L Clement-Kinny, Research Assistant Professor(2002); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2011.

John A. Colosi, Professor (2005); Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz, 1993.

Arlene A. Guest, Senior Lecturer, (1999); M.S., Florida State University, 1981.

Thomas H.C. Herbers, Professor and Associate Chair, Research (1993); Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 1990.

Leonid Ivanov, Research Associate Professor (2012); Ph.D., Marine Hydrophysical Institute of the Ukrain Academy of Sciences, 1983.

John E. Joseph, Assistant Professor (2005); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1991

James MacMahan, Associate Professor (2007), Ph.D., University of Florida, 2003.

Wieslaw Maslowski, Research Professor (1994); Ph.D., University of Alaska-Fairbanks, 1994.

Jeffrey Dean Paduan, Professor (1991); Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1987.

Timour Radko, Associate Professor (2004); Ph.D., Florida State University, 1997.

D. Benjamin Reeder, Associate Research Professor (2011); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program, 2002.

Andrew F. Roberts, Associate Research Professor (2011); Ph.D., University of Tasmania, 2005.

William J. Shaw, Research Assistant Professor (2005); Ph.D., Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 2000.

Keir D. Stahlhut, Military Instructor (2010), M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2006.

Timothy Peter Stanton, Research Professor (1978); M.S., University of Auckland, 1977.

Rebecca E. Stone, Permanent Military Professor (2004); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1999.

Robin T. Tokmakian, Research Associate Professor (1997); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Research Associates And Assistants:

Chenwu Fan, Research Associate(2012); M.S., China Textile University, 1982.

Tetyana Margolina, Research Associate (2011); Ph.D. Marine Hydrophysical Institute of the Ukraine Academy of Sciences, 2001.

Christopher W. Miller, Research Associate (1992); M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1998.

Professors Emeriti:

Robert Hathaway Bourke, Professor Emeritus (1971); Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1972.

Curtis Allan Collins, Professor Emeritus (1987); Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1967.

Roland William Garwood, Professor Emeritus, (1976); Ph.D., University of Washington, 1976.

Glenn Harold Jung, Professor Emeritus (1958); Ph.D., Texas A & M University, 1955, 1950.

Albert Julius Semtner, Jr., Professor Emeritus(1986); Ph.D., Princeton University, 1973

Eugene Dewees Traganza, Professor Emeritus (1970); Ph.D., University of Miami, 1966.

Stevens Parrington Tucker, Professor Emeritus (1968), Ph.D., Oregon State University, 1972.

Joseph John von Schwind, Professor Emeritus (1967); Ph.D., Texas A & M University, 1968.

Distinguished Professor Emeritus:

Eugene C. Haderlie, Distinguished Professor Emeritus, ()Ph.D.; University of California - Berkeley, 1950.

Edward Bennett Thornton, Distinguished Professor Emeritus , (1969); Ph.D., University of Florida, 1970.

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Brief Overview

Founded as a separate department in 1968, the Oceanography Department supports curricula sponsored by the Oceanographer of the Navy: #372 Meteorology #373 Air-Ocean Science, #374 Operational Oceanography, #440 Oceanography. The department also offers the MS in Physical Oceanography to Undersea Warfare curricula #525 (USN) and #526 (international).

The department focuses primarily on Physical Oceanography, Ocean Acoustics and Acoustical Oceanography, Numerical Modeling, Air-Sea Interactions, and Nearshore and Coastal/Littoral Oceanography, and has strong interests in remote sensing and geospatial information systems.

Topics include ocean dynamics, numerical ocean prediction and simulation, satellite remote sensing of the ocean, air-sea interaction, polar oceanography, upper ocean dynamics and thermodynamics, near-shore processes, wave and surf forecasting, mesoscale dynamics, coastal ocean circulation, tactical oceanography and environmental acoustics. The department also provides core courses for Undersea Warfare and the Space Systems curricula.

Degree

A student is able to earn an academic degree listed below while enrolled in Meteorology and Oceanography (Curriculum 373), Operational Oceanography (Curriculum 374), Oceanography (Curriculum 440), and Undersea Warfare (Curriculum 525).

Master of Science in Physical Oceanography

Entrance to a program leading to the Master of Science in Physical Oceanography degree requires a baccalaureate degree. Minimal requirements include mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based physics.

The Master of Science in Physical Oceanography degree requires:

  1. Completion of at least eight physical oceanography graduate courses with at least four courses in the OC4000 series. The sequence of core courses in physical oceanography encompasses the fields of dynamic, acoustical, and coastal/littoral oceanography. The entire sequence of courses selected must be approved by the Department of Oceanography. Significant experience in the field using instruments is required for the degree. (OC3570 satisfies this requirement).
  2. At least 32 credit hours of approved graduate study, of which must include at least eight physical oceanography courses totaling 28 credit hours, and of the 28 credit hours at least 13.5 credit hours must be at the 4000 level in courses other than directed study. Four credit hours of directed study or additional OC elective courses would count for the remainder of the degree requirements.
  3. Completion of an acceptable thesis on a topic approved by the Department of Oceanography.

Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

Direct entrance to a program leading to the Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography degree requires a baccalaureate degree in one of the physical sciences, mathematics, or engineering. This normally permits the validation of a number of required undergraduate courses such as physics, differential equations, linear algebra, vector analysis and various courses in meteorology and/or oceanography, which are prerequisites to the graduate program. These prerequisites may be taken at the Naval Postgraduate School; however, in that event, the program may be lengthened by one or more quarters.

The Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography degree requires:

  1. Necessary prerequisite courses in mathematics (through partial differential equations), meteorology and physical oceanography.
  2. The sequence of core courses in meteorology and oceanography in the fields of dynamical, numerical and physical and synoptic meteorology and oceanography.
  3. An approved selection of graduate elective courses in oceanography and meteorology.
  4. Significant experience in the field using instruments.
  5. An acceptable thesis on a topic approved by either department.

The total number of quarter-hours in (2) and (3) above must be at least 48. These 48 hours must include 20 hours at the 4000 level in courses other than directed study and they should show an approximate balance between the disciplines of Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Dual Degree in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

The Meteorology and Oceanography Departments have adopted a policy to not recommend its award of dual master's degrees in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography

Doctor of Philosophy

Department of Oceanography admission requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy degree include:

A bachelor's degree with a high QPR or a highly successful first graduate year in a master's program, with clear evidence of research ability.

A master's degree may be required before admission to candidacy.

The Ph.D. program is in Physical Oceanography, including areas of study in ocean circulation theory, air-sea interaction, ocean acoustics, nearshore, and coastal/littoral oceanography among others. An applicant to the Ph.D. program who is not already at NPS should submit transcripts of previous academic and professional work, plus results of a current Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test, to the Director of Admissions, Code 01C3, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943-5100.

Oceanographic Laboratories

NPS is a member of UNOLS (University National Oceanography Laboratory System), CENCAL (Central California Cooperative), UCAR (University Corporation for Atmosphere Research), MBCORC (Monterey Bay Crescent Ocean Research Consortium), CeNCOOS (Central and Northern California Ocean Observing Systems and CORE (Consortium for Oceanographic Research and Education). In 2007, CORE Joined with JOI (Joint Oceanographic Institutions) to become CoOL (Consortium for Ocean Leadership). UNOLS operates the nation's academic oceanographic research fleet, while CENCAL promotes and coordinates research vessel operations between several academic institutions in central California. The nearby Moss Landing Marine Laboratory operates the NSF-owned, 135-foot R/V POINT SUR for the benefit of CENCAL.

The Rapid Environmental Assessment Laboratory (REAL) consists of moored-equipment in Monterey Bay, the R/V POINT SUR, and the former PT SUR SOSUS underwater acoustic array provides for instruction in the practical design, deployment and collection of state-of-the-art oceanographic data. Real-time observations of currents, temperature, salinity and sound speed structure in a variety of oceanic regimes are analyzed and modeled, applying theoretical and mathematical techniques learned in the classroom to Naval Oceanography problems.

The Oceanography Department operates a graphics laboratory that is equipped with networked workstations for the analysis of numerical model output, geospatial information system (GIS) exercises, satellite imagery, acoustical data and other digital fields from REAL. Smart classrooms enable data to be brought into the classroom in real time to demonstrate signal processing, rapid environmental assessment and other state-of-the-art oceanographic and tactical decision aids.

The department is organized around thematic laboratories, each containing faculty, staff and student offices, computing facilities and special laboratory equipment. Thematic laboratories exist for Oceanic Planetary, Polar, Nearshore, Acoustics, Coastal /Littoral Modeling, Global and Polar Ocean/Sea Ice Modeling, GI&S, Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction, Ocean Turbulence, Ocean Waves, Radar and Drifter, and Tactical Environmental Support.

Oceanography Course Descriptions

OC Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<OC Courses OC0001-OC3445>

OC0001 Meteorology and Oceanography Colloquium (0-1) Every Quarter

(No credit.) Departmental lecture series covering topics of current interest by NPS and outside guest speakers. Graded pass/fail. Prerequisites: none.

OC0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Every Quarter

Every student conducting research in oceanography will enroll in this course.

OC0999 Thesis Seminars (No Credit) (2-0) Every Quarter

Students in the various oceanography curricula present their thesis research. Prerequisites: Preparation of a thesis.

OC2020 Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences (2-2) Summer

Introduction to the programming languages, operating systems, and computing facilities which METOC students use in MR and OC courses. Laboratory assignments are elementary problems in oceanography and meteorology. Prerequisites: Calculus and college physics.

OC2022 Scientific Fortran Programming (2-2) As Required

Structured Fortran programming as applied to elementary problems including oceanography and meteorology. Prerequisites: Calculus.

OC2902 Fundamentals of Geospatial Information and Services (3-0) As Required

This course will give the student an appreciation for the important facts about precision location today, from the true physical shape of the earth to the fusion of geographically labeled data in modern electronic databases. Today's military officer needs to know the fundamentals of precision location systems to operate in the battlespace of the twenty-first century. We have come from precise position being 60 nautical miles in the 1700s to a few meters in the 2000s. We have gone from dead reckoning on paper charts to GPS positions fed to fully automated navigation and weapons systems. The entire process of producing modern geospatially tagged items will be reviewed. This will include the scientific background of the processes and the advantages and limitations of the steps.  Prerequisites: Students will need to have a basic understanding of algebra, geometry and trigonometry. A basic course in physics or equivalent that covers vector, conservation of energy and forces is needed. The student needs to be familiar with basic computer skills including the storage of data in arrays (spreadsheets work is sufficient for example).

OC2910 Use of U.S. Navy Operational Ocean Circulation and Tide Models (3-2) As Required

This course aims to provide Navy users with the information necessary to make informed and intelligent use of the Navy's operational ocean circulation and tide models. The course assumes some familiarity with physical oceanography, and experience working with output from atmospheric and/or oceanographic models. Basic concepts in physical oceanography and numerical modeling will be covered as introduction to more detailed descriptions of each of the Navy operational models and their capabilities. Students will work with output from the Navy models, and perform some model runs themselves. Evaluation of student learning will be in the form of exercises where students will be presented with several hypothetical (or real) operational scenarios and have to choose which model products to use in preparing a forecast or analysis, justify their choices, and interpret the products.

OC2930 Oceanography for Undersea Warfare (3-0) Summer

An introduction to ocean processes and phenomena with applications to Undersea Warfare. Prerequisites: None.

OC3030 Oceanographic Computing and Data Display (2-2) As Required

Course emphasizes the use of the computer as a tool in oceanography problem-solving. Use of various software packages for graphics, scientific visualization, statistics and numerical computation. Prerequisites: OC/MR2020, OC3240 or MR/OC3522, or the consent of instructor. Graded: Pass/Fail.

OC3120 Biogeochemical Processes in the Ocean (4-3) As Required

Basic biological, geological, and chemical processes in the ocean. Bioacoustics, deep scattering layers, and bio-deterioration. Geomorphic features of the ocean floor; kinds and distribution of ocean bottom features. Chemical composition of the ocean. Prerequisites: None.

OC3140 Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Science (3-2) Summer

Basic probability and statistics, in the air-ocean science context. Techniques of statistical data analysis. Structure of a probability model, density distribution function, expectation, and variance. Binomial, Poisson and Gaussian distributions. Conditional probability and independence. Joint distributions, covariance and central limit theorem. Transformations of random variables. Histograms and empirical distributions and associated characteristics such as moments and percentiles. Standard tests of hypotheses and confidence intervals for both one-and two-parameter situations. Regression analysis as related to least squares estimation. Prerequisites: Calculus.

OC3150 Analysis of Air Ocean Time Series (3-2) Spring/Fall

Analysis methods for atmospheric and oceanic time series. Fourier transforms applied to linear systems and discrete data. Correlation functions, power density spectra and cross-spectrum. Optimal design of air-ocean data network. Laboratory work involves analysis of actual atmospheric and ocean time series using principles developed in class. Prerequisites: A probability and statistics course.

OC3210 Polar Oceanography (3-0) Summer

Covers the ice characteristics and physical oceanography of polar seas. Sea ice: types, physical and mechanical properties, heat flux, temporal and spatial distribution, melting and freezing processes, forecasting models, and remote sensing of ice/snow covered surfaces. Physical oceanography of currents and water masses, deep and bottom water formation, fronts and eddies, polynya processes, and underwater acoustics. Discuss naval and research operations in polar warfare. Prerequisites: OC3240.

OC3212 Polar Meteorology/Oceanography (4-0) Winter

Operational aspects of Arctic and Antarctic meteorology, including polar lows, boundary layer and marginal ice zone influences. Polar oceanography. Sea ice amount, seasonal distribution, melting and freezing processes, physical and mechanical properties, drift and predictions. Physical oceanography of currents and water masses, deep and bottom water formation, fronts and eddies, polynya processes. Prerequisites: MR3222 and OC3240 or consent of instructor.

OC3230 Descriptive Physical Oceanography (3-1) Spring/Fall

Physical properties of seawater. Processes influencing the distribution of heat, salt and density in the ocean. Static stability in the ocean. Circulation and water masses in the ocean. Laboratory work involves collection and analysis of actual data using principles developed in class.

OC3231 Descriptive Regional Oceanography (4-0) As Required

Overview of basic concepts. Water masses and regional circulation including littoral regions and marginal seas. Recent developments dealing with ocean circulation, sea level, climate, El Nino, ocean resources and pollution, and modern observational techniques. Prerequisites: OC3230 or the equivalent.

OC3240 Ocean Circulation Analysis (4-2) Winter/Summer

Application of dynamic concepts of ocean circulation, including conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Oceanic currents without friction: inertial and geostrophic flows. Frictional currents: Reynolds equations, Ekman and wind-driven flows. Vorticity balance: Sverdrup transport, potential vorticity, topographic steering, western intensification and Rossby waves. Thermohaline effects and thermocline theory. Prerequisites: OC3230 and OC3321 or the equivalent.

OC3260 Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics (4-1) Spring/Fall

The fundamentals of ocean acoustics, including the acoustic wave equation, ray theory, acoustic arrays and filters, ambient noise, scattering, absorption, an introduction to normal mode theory, and sonar equations. Laboratory emphasizes acoustic signal processing techniques. Prerequisites: OC3230, partial differential equations or equivalent.

OC3300 Ocean Policy (3-1) As Required

Students will study ocean policy issues as they relate to the use and restriction of use of waters, both international and national, by the U.S. Navy and joint forces. The course will include an introduction to the institutions and players involved in the policy formulation; the policy making process; implementation, enforcement, and compliance; and consequences and effectiveness. Several questions relevant to Navy operations will be addressed: What are the consequences of the current policy structure (protected areas, impeded exercises, etc.)? How do we operate under these policies? What alternatives exist? How do we influence the policies? Students will become familiar with current issues for the Navy Environmental Readiness staff (OPNAV N45), current policy issues for the Oceanographer of the Navy staff (OPNAV N84), with current Navy guidance on environmental programs and protections, and with the reports and recommendations of the several national-level commissions on the ocean. Prerequisites: None.

OC3321 Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics (4-0) Fall

A foundation course for studies of atmospheric and oceanographic motions. The governing dynamical equations for rotating stratified fluid are derived from fundamental physical laws. Topics include the continuum hypothesis, real and apparent forces, derivations and applications of the governing equations, coordinate systems, scale analysis, simple balanced flows, boundary conditions, thermal wind, barotropic and baroclinic conditions, circulation, vorticity, and divergence. Prerequisites: Multi-variable calculus, vectors, and ordinary differential equations (may be taken concurrently).

OC3325 Marine Geophysics (3-0) As Required

Theory and methods of marine geophysics surveys, and emphasis on gravity, magnetism, seismic and acoustic wave propagation; geophysical anomalies associated with major sea floor features; marine geodesy. Prerequisites: OC3120 (may be taken concurrently).

OC3445 Oceanic and Atmospheric Observational Systems (2-2) As Required

Principles of measurement; sensors, data acquisition systems, calibration, etc. Methods of measurement for thermodynamic and dynamic variables in the ocean and atmosphere, including acoustics and optics. Prerequisites: OC3230 and MR3420, MR/OC3150 or consent of instructor.

<OC Courses OC3520-OC5810>

OC3520 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean (4-0) As Required

Principles of radiative transfer and satellite sensors and systems; visual, infrared and microwave radiometry, and radar systems; application of satellite remotely-sensed data in the measurement of atmospheric and oceanic variability. Prerequisites: Undergraduate physics and differential/integral calculus; ordinary differential equations and MR3480 or consent of instructor.

OC3522 Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean/Laboratory (4-2) As Required

Same as OC3520 plus laboratory sessions on the concepts considered in the lecture series. Prerequisites: Same as OC3520.

OC3570 Operational Oceanography and Meteorology (2-4) As Required

Experience at sea acquiring and analyzing oceanographic and atmospheric data using state-of-the-art instrumentation. Integration of satellite remote sensing and other operational products with in-situ data. Includes survey of instrumentation, pre-cruise planning, operations at sea, and post-cruise analysis. Prerequisites: OC3240, MR3220, or consent of instructor.

OC3571 Instruments and Observations (2-0) As Required

Introduction to the core oceanographic and atmospheric instruments used in support of environmental monitoring and modeling. Principles of instrument design and sampling protocols will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the capabilities and limitation of autonomous platforms, on aircraft- and shore-based remote sensing, and on the major systems in place to organize and distribute environmental data. A brief introduction to data assimilation will be included to illustrate the critical link between observations and oceanic and atmospheric circulation models. Prerequisite: OC3230 or consent of instructor.

OC3572 Operational Oceanography and Meteorology Lab (0-4) As Required

This course is intended to insure a flexible hands-on experience deploying equipment in a realistic environment. Students will be required to design their individual field programs working with the instructor and the curriculum's program officer. Approved programs include: 1) design and implementation of coastal ocean or atmosphere sampling protocols using unmanned vehicles, 2) design and implementation of monitoring plans for the surf zone or estuarine environments (in this case OC4210 may be taken as an alternative), 3) design and implementation of sampling protocols for the atmosphere using fixed-location or aircraft-based sensors, 4) design of and participation in upper-ocean or lower-atmosphere sampling protocols at polar ice camps, and 5) design of and participation in deep-water surveys onboard ocean-going research vessels using NPS vessel time or faculty-mentored cruises of opportunity. Prerequisite: OC3571 (may be taken concurrently) or consent of instructor.

OC3750 Naval Astronomy and Precise Time (2-0) As Required

Positional astronomy. Coordinate systems. Solar system dynamics. Astrometry (measurements of positions and motion of stars). Time, earth rotation and atomic clocks. Naval applications of astronomy. Overview of astrophysics and cosmology. Prerequisites: College physics and calculus.

OC3902 Fundamentals of Mapping, Charting and Geodesy (3-2) As Required

Basics of map/chart generation and scientific basis for their accuracy and precision. Ellipsoids, latitudes, longitudes, datums, datum transformations, map projections, geoid and heights. Map/chart generation process including satellite surveying. Use of map/charts with modern navigation systems, including GPS. Digital map characteristics. Prerequisites: Vector analysis, probability and statistics or consent of instructor.

OC3903 Electronic Surveying and Navigation (3-0) As Required

Introduction to the theory and practice of electronic navigation including principles of electronics, geometry, and error propagation. Covers ground-based and satellite systems. The global positioning system is covered in detail. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

OC4210 Littoral Field Studies (2-4) Spring/Fall

Employs the scientific method for studying nearshore and wave processes using field observations in littoral battlespace environments. Monterey Bay, CA will be used as a natural laboratory for studying a plethora of littoral related topics. Students will design a small nearshore field experiment or set of experiments, deploy state-of-the-art instrumentation, and analyze data to test relevant nearshore hypotheses. Students will write a mini-proposal with budget focused on their scientific hypothesis, experiment, and analysis, and write a scientific final report. Introductions and limitations of instrumentation will be discussed and integrated into the field design, which will include deployment schemes and subsequent analyses. Data quality control and analysis techniques will be described and implemented. In particular, tidal harmonic analysis will be introduced and performed. The course is divided into 1) in-class discussions (instrumentation, deployment schemes, and data analysis techniques), and 2) field exercises that require student participation in performing the proposed small experiments. There is a high probability that students will get wet, but it is not a requirement. Prerequisites: OC3140; OC3150; Matlab familiarity; or consent of instructor.

OC4211 Ocean Waves (4-0) Spring/Fall

Linear theory of surface, internal, inertial-internal and Rossby waves, barotropic and baroclinic instabilities. Coastal and equatorial trapped waves. Prerequisites: Partial differential equations and OC3240.

OC4212 Tides (4-0) As Required

Development of the theory of tides including the tide-producing forces, equilibrium tides, and the dynamic theory of tides; harmonic analysis and prediction of tides; tidal datum planes and their relationship with geodetic datum planes, short-term and secular changes in sea level. Prerequisites: OC4211.

OC4213 Nearshore and Wave Processes (3-1) Winter

Shoal-water wave processes, breakers and surf; nearshore water circulation; beach characteristics; littoral drift; coastal hydraulics; storm surge. Prerequisites: OC4211 or consent of instructor.

OC4220 Coastal Circulation (4-1) Spring

Coastal ocean physical processes. Dynamics and models of coastal ocean circulations driven by wind, thermohaline, tidal, boundary currents, and ocean eddy forces. Recent papers on coastal ocean circulation. Laboratory sessions on computing properties of tides, coastal trapped waves and wind-driven motions over the shelf and slope. Prerequisites: OC4211 (may be taken concurrently).

OC4230 Physical Oceanography of Monterey Bay (3-0) As Required

Monterey Bay will be used as a case study for various processes affecting the physical oceanography of coastal environments. Topics to include coastal upwelling, flow in and around submarine canyons, internal waves, air-sea interactions, and tides and seiches. Historical, recent, and ongoing studies in and around the bay will be considered. Prerequisites: OC3240 or consent of instructor.

OC4250 General Circulation of the Atmosphere and Oceans (3-0) As Required

Selected topics on the general circulation of the atmosphere (e.g. heat, momentum and moisture fluxes; energetics) and ocean (e.g. linear and non-linear theories of the wind-driven ocean circulation); coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

OC4262 Theories & Models in Underwater Acoustics (3-0) As Required

Development of the underlying theories and algorithms of ray, normal mode, and parabolic equation acoustic models for both range independent and dependent environments. Examination of the strengths and weaknesses of and similarities between the various models. Prerequisites: OC3260 and partial differential equations or equivalent.

OC4267 Ocean Acoustic Variability and Uncertainty (4-0) Fall

Examines sound speed profiles (time and space variability), ambient noise, absorption, and reflection and scattering from the sea surface and bottom as they affect sound propagation in the ocean. Synoptic prediction techniques for ambient noise and transmission loss are reviewed. Environmental data input and computational approximations for acoustic models are evaluated against observed signal fluctuations and transmission loss. The course is designed for the Air-Ocean Science, Operational Oceanography, and USW Curricula. Prerequisites: OC3230 and OC3260 or equivalent.

OC4270 Tactical Oceanography (3-4) Winter/Summer

Course emphasizes the tactical use of the environment and battlespace characterization as a force multiplier in naval operations including acoustic undersea warfare, special operations, amphibious warfare, and mine warfare. Using tailored lectures, students will examine oceanographic conditions and the ability for naval forces to exploit them in nearshore, coastal and deep ocean settings. Current acoustic prediction models, remote sensing, tactical decision aids and Geographic Information Systems (GIS) will be utilized by students as they explore a broad spectrum of environmental conditions and methods for exploitation by naval forces. Students will also utilize the R/V PT SUR to perform experiments and analyze data relating to acoustic propagation and the ocean. Prerequisites: For Meteorology and Oceanography students: OC3260, OC4267 (concurrent), or consent of instructor. For USW students: OC3260 and EC4450 (concurrent), or consent of instructor. Classification: SECRET Clearance and U.S. Citizenship is required. Lecture series is UNCLASSIFIED.

OC4271 Topics in Tactical Oceanography (3-0) Winter/Summer

Course emphasizes the tactical use of the environment and battlespace characterization as a force multiplier in naval operations, including acoustic undersea warfare, special operations, amphibious warfare, and mine warfare. Using tailored lectures, students will examine oceanographic conditions and the ability for naval forces to exploit them in nearshore, coastal and deep ocean settings. Prerequisites: For International Meteorology and Oceanography students: OC3260, OC4267 (concurrent), or consent of instructor. For International USW students: OC3260 and EC4450 (concurrent), or consent of instructor.

OC4323 Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling (4-2) Spring

Numerical models of atmospheric and oceanic phenomena. Finite difference techniques for solving elliptic and hyperbolic equations, linear and non-linear computational instability. Spectral and finite element models. Filtered and primitive equation prediction models. Sigma coordinates. Objective analysis and initialization. Moisture and heating as time permits. Prerequisites: MR4322 or OC4211, partial differential equations; numerical analysis desirable.

OC4324 Advanced Numerical Ocean Modeling (3-0) As Required

Advanced techniques for simulating and predicting ocean circulation, including recent modeling results. Topics to include multi-layer guasi-geotrophic models, multi-level primitive equation models, treatment of irregular geometry and open boundary conditions, satellite data assimilation and computer technology considerations. Prerequisites: MR/OC4323.

OC4325 METOC for Warfighter Decision Making (3-2) Spring

This course introduces decision science in the context of utilizing deterministic vs. stochastic meteorological and oceanographic forecasts to improve strategic, operational, and tactical planning. Various aspects of generating, communicating, and applying stochastic forecasts for optimal decision making under uncertainty are explored. Prerequisites: MR/OC3140 or similar course on statistics. MR/OC4323 and MR4324 are recommended but not required.

OC4331 Ocean Variability (4-0) As Required

Contemporary knowledge of ocean mesoscale eddies, fronts, meandering currents; baroclinic and barotropic instabilities; kinematics, dynamics and energetics for observations, theories and models. Prerequisites: OC4211 or equivalent.

OC4335 Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction (3-2)As Required

Advanced knowledge of the U.S. Navy ocean analysis and prediction systems, including the Naval Ocean Modeling Program (NOMP), naval ocean data systems, atmospheric forcing systems, data assimilation systems, Optimal Thermal Interpolation System (OTIS), Thermal Ocean Prediction Systems (TOPS), the global ocean circulation prediction system, Shallow Water Analysis and Forecast System (SWAFS), Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS), and global wave prediction system (WAM). Prerequisites: OC4211 and MR/OC4323 (may be taken concurrently).

OC4413 Air/Sea Interaction (4-0) Summer

Fundamental concepts in turbulence. The atmospheric planetary boundary layer, including surface layer, and bulk formulae for estimating air-sea fluxes. The oceanic planetary boundary layer including the dynamics of the well-mixed surface layer. Recent papers on large-scale air-sea interaction. Prerequisites: MR/OC3150, and OC3240 or MR3240 or consent of instructor.

OC4414 Advanced Air/Sea Interaction (3-0) As Required

Advanced topics in the dynamics of the atmospheric and oceanic planetary boundary layers. Prerequisites: MR/OC4413 or consent of instructor.

OC4415 Ocean Turbulence (3-0) As Required

Advanced topics in the dynamics of ocean turbulence, wakes and microstructure. Prerequisites: MR/OC4413 or consent of instructor.

OC4490 Ocean Acoustic Tomography (Same as EC4490) (3-0) As Required

An introduction to Ocean Tomography, an underwater acoustic inverse technique for mapping ocean sound speed and current fields. Covers the major aspects of Ocean Acoustic Tomography, including the underlying concepts, the design and transmission of tomographic signals, and linear inverse methods for the reconstruction of ocean fields. Prerequisites: OC3260 or EC3450 or PH4453 or equivalent; linear algebra, partial differential equations or equivalent.

OC4520 Topics in Satellite Remote Sensing (3-0) As Required

Selected topics in the advanced application of satellite remote sensing to the measurement of atmospheric and oceanic variables. Prerequisites: MR/OC3522.

OC4610 Wave and Surf Forecasting (2-2) As Required

Theory and prediction of wind-generated ocean waves. Spectral transformation of waves from deep to shallow water. Prediction of surf and wave related influences on operations. Prerequisites: OC3150, OC4211.

OC4800 Advanced Courses in Oceanography (Variable hours 1-0 to 4-0) As Required

Advanced courses in various aspects of oceanography. Typically these are advanced topics not covered in regularly offered courses. The course may be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and the Department Chairman.

OC4900 Directed Study in Oceanography (V-0) Every Quarter

Independent study of advanced topics in oceanography. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and the Department Chairman. Graded on Pass/Fail basis only.

OC5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) Every Quarter

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

Meteorology and Oceanography (METOC) - Curriculum 373 (Under Department of Oceanography)

Program Officer

William (Bill) Sommer, CDR, USN

Code 75, Spanagel Hall, Room 304

(831) 656-2045, DSN 756-2045

wlsommer@nps.edu

Academic Associate:

Ching-Sang Chiu, Ph.D.

Spanagel Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-3239, DSN 756-3239

chiu@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This curriculum in meteorology and oceanography involves approximately 109 quarter-hours of classroom lectures, supplemented by an additional 42 quarter-hours of laboratory exercises. This program is designed to provide the student with:

This education will enhance performance in all duties throughout a career, including operational billets, technical management assignments and policy making positions. Students will develop graduate-level technical ability based upon scientific principles, acquire diverse professional knowledge, and develop analytical ability for practical problem solving.

Requirements for Entry

This program is open to METOC (1800) Officers, officers from other services, International Officers and DoD civilians.

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sciences, mathematics or engineering is required. Completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based college physics are required. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry.

Entry Date

METOC curriculum is a nine quarter course of study with entry dates in September and March. Students approved for a refresher quarter enter in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer. Academic questions may be referred directly to either of the Academic Associates.

Degree

Master of Science in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a METOC Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6401P. The Curriculum Sponsor is the Oceanographer of the Navy (CNO N2/N6E).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

METOC Officer aboard CV(N)/LHD

Submarine Group Staff

Numbered Fleet Staff

CARSRTKGRU Staff

OIC Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command Detachment

NAVMETOCCOM Mobile Warfare Teams

National Geospatial Agency

Office of Naval Research

Typical Course of Study - Fall Start

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Ordinary Differential Equations

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmos. Thermodynamics & Radiative Processes

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

MR3222

(4-3)

Meteorological Analysis/Lab

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

OC3260

(4-1)

Fund. of Ocean Acoustics

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Fluid Dynamics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 4

 

 

MR4322

(4-0)

Dynamic Meteorology

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air-Sea Interaction

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 5

 

 

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air & Ocean Modeling

MR3234

(4-4)

Tropospheric & Stratospheric Meteorology/Lab

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Met & Ocean

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

MR/OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Meteorology/ Oceanography

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 6

 

 

MR3252

(4-4)

Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory

MR/OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Meteorology & Oceanography

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 7

 

 

MR4240

(3-1)

Coastal Meteorology

OC4335

(4-0)

METOC Decision Theory

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 8

 

 

MR4416

(3-0)

Atmospheric Factors in EM/EO Propagation

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 9

 

 

MR3262

(3-5)

Operational Atmospheric Prediction

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0999

(2-0)

Theses Presentation

Typical Course of Study - Spring Start

 

 

 

Quarter 1

 

 

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

MA1115

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116

(3-0)

Vector Analysis

MA2121

(4-0)

Ordinary Differential Equations

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 2

 

 

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmos. Thermodynamics & Radiative Processes

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Integral Transforms

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 3

 

 

MR3222

(4-3)

Meteorological Analysis/Lab

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

OC3260

(4-1)

Fund. of Ocean Acoustics

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Fluid Dynamics

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 4

 

 

MR4322

(4-0)

Dynamic Meteorology

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air-Sea Interaction

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 5

 

 

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air & Ocean Modeling

MR3234

(4-4)

Tropospheric & Stratospheric Meteorology/Lab

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

MR/OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Meteorology/ Oceanography

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 6

 

 

MR3252

(4-4)

Tropical Meteorology/Laboratory

MR/OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

MR4416

(3-0)

Atmos. Factors in EM/EO Propagation

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 7

 

 

MR3262

(3-1)

Operational Atmospheric Prediction/Laboratory

MR4325

(4-0)

METOC Decision Theory

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 8

 

 

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Meteorology & Oceanography

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

 

 

 

Quarter 9

 

 

MR4240

(3-1)

Coastal Meteorology

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

MR/OC0999

(2-0)

Theses Presentation

MR/OC0001

(0-1)

METOC Seminar

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Meteorology & Oceanography (METOC) - Curriculum 373
Subspecialty Code: 6401P

  1. Weapon & Sensor Performance: The officer must have an understanding of the effects of open-ocean and near-shore ocean and atmospheric properties on weapons, sensors, and platform performance. The officer must have the ability to translate this knowledge into warfighter decision recommendations based on sound decision theory, taking into account available courses of action, assessments of vulnerability, uncertainty, and risk as indicated on performance surfaces.
  2. Integration of Oceanic & Atmospheric Parameters: The officer must be able to observe, assimilate, analyze, and predict oceanic and littoral water conditions, and atmospheric conditions using direct and remote sensing observation techniques, statistical analysis, and numerical models. The officer will have a sound understanding of polar, mid-latitude and tropical atmospheric and oceanographic dynamics, including the impact of regional conditions on military operations and systems.
  3. Numerical Processing: The officer will have a thorough understanding of numerical modeling/processing as it applies to the physics and dynamics of the ocean and the atmosphere. This understanding should include a broad understanding of the modeling process itself to include strengths, weaknesses, and vulnerabilities; the state of current models and techniques; and appropriate applications of deterministic and stochastic techniques.
  4. Ocean/Atmosphere Problem Solving: The officer must develop critical thinking skills and conduct independent analyses to solve environmentally challenging problems in the fields of Physical Oceanography and/or Meteorology as they apply to Naval/Joint operations, using modern scientific research techniques, field experience, tools, and equipment. The officer should understand the concept of developing and producing a performance surface.
  5. Other NPS Requirements: The officer must successfully complete all NPS requirements for the Master's Degree in Meteorology and Physical Oceanography.

Operational Oceanography - Curriculum 374

Program Officer

William (Bill) Sommer, CDR, USN

Code 75, Spanagel Hall, Room 304

(831) 656-2045, DSN 756-2045

wlsommer@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Ching-Sang Chiu, Ph.D.

Spanagel Hall, Room 313

(831) 656-3239, DSN 756-3239

chiu@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This flexible oceanography curriculum involves approximately 100 quarter-hours of classroom lectures, supplemented by an additional 20 quarter-hours of laboratory exercises. This program is designed to provide the student with:

This curriculum is designed to allow the student to meet all of the requirements for Navy PME (as established by the Chief of Naval Operations) and for Joint PME (as established by the Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff) for Intermediate Level Professional Military Education.

The Operational Oceanography Curriculum has a physical oceanography and ocean acoustics base. It is a very flexible program allowing students to examine oceanographic topics relevant to their warfare specialization areas, such as antisubmarine warfare, amphibious warfare, mine warfare, anti-air warfare, strike warfare and special warfare. This program is open to Unrestricted Line Officers (1110, 1120, 1310, 1320), officers from other services, International Officers and DoD civilians.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sciences, mathematics or engineering is desirable. Completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based college physics are required. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry. A refresher quarter is available for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements for direct entry and is offered in the Spring or Fall quarter prior to 374 enrollment.

Entry Date

Operational Oceanography is an eight-quarter course of study with entry dates in January and July. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or the Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

Master of Science in Physical Oceanography.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as an Operational Oceanography Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6402P. The curriculum sponsor is the Oceanographer of the Navy (CNO N2/N6E).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

CV ASW Module

ASW Operations Center

Navy Laboratories

Office of Naval Research

Naval Academy Instructor

NIMA

Naval Oceanographic Office

Typical Course of Study - Fall Start

Quarter 1

MA1115 (1st 6wks)

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116 (2nd 6wks)

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

Quarter 2

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Sciences

Quarter 3

OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics

NW3275

(2-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 1)

OC3260

(4-1)

Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics

Quarter 4

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air Sea Interaction

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

NW3276

(2-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 2)

Quarter 5

OC4267

(4-0)

Ocean Acoustic Variability and Uncertainty

MR/OC4323

(4-0)

Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Oceanography

Quarter 6

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

OC3212

(4-0)

Polar Meteorology and Oceanography

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 7

OC4325

(4-0)

METOC for Warfighter Decision Making

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 8

NW3285

(3-0)

National Strategy Decision Making

OC0810

(2-0)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(2-0)

Thesis Research

OC0999

(0-8)

Thesis Presentation

Typical Course of Study - Spring Start

Quarter 1

MA1115 (1st 6wks)

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116 (2nd 6wks)

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

Quarter 2

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Sciences

Quarter 3

OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics

NW3275

(2-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 1)

OC3260

(4-1)

Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics

Quarter 4

OC4210

(2-4)

Littoral Field Studies

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air Sea Interaction

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis

NW3276

(2-0)

Joint Maritime Operations (Part 2)

Quarter 5

OC4325

(4-0)

METOC for Warfighter Decision Making

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Oceanography

Quarter 6

OC4270

(3-4)

Tactical Oceanography

OC4800

(4-0)

Elective

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air Sea Interaction

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 7

OC4267

(4-0)

Ocean Acoustic Variability and Uncertainty

MR/OC4323

(4-0)

Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 8

NW3285

(3-0)

National Strategy Decision Making

OC0810

(2-0)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(2-0)

Thesis Research

OC0999

(0-8)

Thesis Presentation

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Operational Oceanography- Curriculum 374
Subspecialty Code: 6402P

  1. Weapon & Sensor Performance: The officer must have an understanding of the effects of open-ocean and near-shore ocean on weapons, sensors, and platform performance. The officer must have the ability to translate this knowledge into warfighter decision recommendations, taking into account available courses of action, assessments of vulnerability, uncertainty, and risk.
  2. Integration of Oceanic Parameters: The officer must be able to observe, assimilate, analyze, and predict oceanic and littoral water conditions using direct and remote sensing observation techniques, statistical analysis, and numerical models. The officer will have a sound understanding of polar, mid-latitude oceanographic dynamics, including the impact of regional conditions on military operations and systems.
  3. Numerical Processing: The officer will have a thorough understanding of numerical modeling/processing as it applies to the physics and dynamics of the ocean. This understanding should include a broad understanding of the modeling process itself to include strengths, weaknesses, and vulnerabilities; the state of current models and techniques; and appropriate applications of deterministic and stochastic techniques.
  4. Ocean Problem Solving: The officer must develop critical thinking skills and conduct independent analyses to solve environmentally challenging problems in the field of Physical Oceanography as it applies to Naval/Joint operations, using modern scientific research techniques, field experience, tools, and equipment.
  5. Other NPS Requirements: The officer must successfully complete all NPS requirements for the Master's Degree in Physical Oceanography.

Oceanography - Curriculum 440

Program Officer

William (Bill) Sommer, CDR, USN

Code 75, Spanagel Hall, Room 304

(831) 656-2045, DSN 756-2045

wlsommer@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Mary Batteen, Ph.D.

Code OC, Spanagel Hall, Room 346

(831) 656-3265, DSN 756-3265

mlbattee@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Oceanography Curriculum provides students with a sound understanding of the science of oceanography. The student develops the technical expertise to provide and use oceanographic and acoustical data and models in support of all aspects of at-sea operations. The graduate will be able to:

This education further enhances performance in operational billets, technical management assignments and policy-making positions. Students will develop a sound, graduate-level, technical ability based on scientific principles.

Requirements for Entry

This program is open to International Officers, officers from other services and DoD civilians. It is open to METOC (1800) officers as a Ph.D. program.

A baccalaureate degree in the physical sciences, mathematics or engineering is required. Completion of mathematics through differential and integral calculus and one year of calculus-based college physics are required. An APC of 323 is required for direct entry. A refresher quarter is available for candidates who do not meet all admission requirements for direct entry, and is offered in the Spring or Fall quarter prior to 440 enrollment.

Entry Date

Oceanography is a 6-8 quarter course of study with entry dates in September and April. If further information is needed, contact the Program Officer for this curriculum. Academic questions may be referred directly to the Academic Associate.

Degree

Master of Science in Physical Oceanography.

Typical Course of Study - Fall

Quarter 1 (Fall)

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA1115 (1st 6wks)

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116 (2nd 6wks)

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

Quarter 2 (Winter)

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics

OC3902

(3-2)

Fundamental of GI&S (or Elective)

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Radiative Processes

Quarter 3 (Spring)

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean/Laboratory

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Sciences

OC3260

(4-1)

Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Circulation Analysis I

Quarter 4 (Summer)

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Waves

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

IT1600

(3-0)

Communication Skills for International Officers (or Elective)

IT1700

(2-0)

Academic Writing for International Officers (or Elective)

Quarter 5 (Fall)

OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Oceanography

MR/OC3570

(2-4)

Operational Oceanography and Meteorology

OC4267

(4-0)

Ocean Acoustic Variability and Uncertainty

OC4610

(2-2)

Wave and Surf Forecasting

Quarter 6 (Winter)

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling

OC0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

OC4220

(4-1)

Coastal Circulation

OC4213

(3-1)

Nearshore and Wave Processes

Quarter 7 (Spring)

OC4271

(3-0)

Tactical Oceanography

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air Sea Interaction

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Quarter 8 (Summer)

OC4331

(3-1)

Ocean Variability

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0999

(2-0)

Thesis Presentation

OCXXXX

(4-0)

Elective

Typical Course of Study - Spring

Quarter 1 (Spring)

MR/OC2020

(2-2)

Computer Computations in Air-Ocean Sciences

MA1115 (1st 6wks)

(4-0)

Multi-variable Calculus

MA1116 (2nd 6wks)

(4-0)

Vector Calculus

MA2121

(4-0)

Differential Equations

OC3230

(3-1)

Descriptive Physical Oceanography

Quarter 2 (Summer)

MA3132

(4-0)

Partial Differential Equations and Fourier Analysis

MR/OC3321

(4-0)

Air-Ocean Fluid Dynamics

OC3902

(3-2)

Fundamental of GI&S (or Elective)

MR3480

(4-1)

Atmospheric Thermodynamics and Radiative Processes

Quarter 3 (Fall)

MR/OC3522

(4-2)

Remote Sensing of the Atmosphere and Ocean/Laboratory

MR/OC3140

(3-2)

Probability and Statistics for Air-Ocean Sciences

OC3260

(4-1)

Fundamentals of Ocean Acoustics

OC3240

(4-2)

Ocean Dynamics I

Quarter 4 (Winter)

OC4211

(4-0)

Ocean Dynamics II

MR/OC3150

(3-2)

Analysis of Air/Ocean Time Series

OC4220

(4-1)

Coastal Circulation

IT1600

(3-0)

Communication Skills for International Officers (or Elective)

Quarter 5 (Spring)

MR/OC4413

(4-0)

Air Sea Interaction

OC4900

(V-0)

Directed Study in Oceanography

OC4267

(4-0)

Ocean Acoustic Prediction

IT1700

(2-0)

Academic Writing for International Officers (or Elective)

Quarter 6 (Summer)

MR/OC4323

(4-2)

Numerical Air and Ocean Modeling

OC0810

(4-0)

Thesis Research

OC4331

(3-1)

Mesoscale Ocean Variability

OCXXXX

(4-0)

Elective

Quarter 7 (Fall)

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC4271

(3-0)

Tactical Oceanography

OC3570

(2-4)

Operational Oceanography and Meteorology

OC4610

(2-2)

Wave and Surf Forecasting

Quarter 8 (Winter)

OC4213

(3-1)

Nearshore and Wave Processes

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

OC0999

(2-0)

Thesis Presentation

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Oceanography (Masters) - Curriculum 440
Subspecialty Code: Not Applicable For MS Degree

Note - there is no p-code associated with this program, thus there are no official ESRs. This list describes the skills that this program will provide students upon successful completion of the program.

This curriculum provides students with a sound understanding of the science of oceanography. The student develops the technical expertise to provide and use oceanographic and acoustical data and models in support of all aspects of at-sea operations. The graduate will be able to:

  1. Interpret and predict oceanic and air-ocean interface conditions.
  2. Operate modern oceanographic data management, archival and communications systems.
  3. Plan, conduct, interpret and present results of research activities.

This education further enhances performance in operational billets, technical management assignments and policy-making positions. Students will develop a sound, graduate-level, technical ability based on scientific principles.

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Oceanography (Ph.D.) - Curriculum 440
Subspecialty Code: 6402D

The officer must have a thorough theoretical and functional knowledge (obtained at the doctorate level) of the principles of oceanography and its effects on naval warfare and weapons systems.

Department of Physics

Chairman

Andres Larraza, Ph.D.

Code PH/La, Spanagel Hall, Room 200

(831) 656-2896, DSN 756-2896

larraza@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Instruction and Administration

Richard Harkins, MS

Code PH/Hr, Spanagel Hall

Room 142A

(831) 656-2828, DSN 756-2828

rharkins@nps.edu

Associate Chairman, Research

Kevin Smith, Ph.D.

Code PH/Sk, Spanagel Hall

Room 114

(831) 656-2107, DSN 756-2107

kbsmith@nps.edu

Steven Richard Baker, Associate Professor (1985); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1985.

Joseph Blau, Research Associate Professor (1989); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 2002.

Brett Borden, Professor (2002); Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin, 1986.

Ronald E. Brown, Research Professor (2002); Ph.D., University of Southern California, 1972.

William Boniface Colson, Distinguished Professor (1989); Ph.D., Stanford University, 1977.

Keith Cohn, Research Assistant Professor (2009); Ph.D., Stanford University, 2007.

Peter P. Crooker, Senior Lecturer (2001); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1967.

David Scott Davis, Associate Professor (1989); Ph.D., Purdue University, 1976.

Bruce C. Denardo, Associate Professor (1998); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1990.

Dragoslav Grbovic, Assistant Professor (2010), Ph.D., University of Tennessee-Knoxville, 2007.

Richard M. Harkins, Senior Lecturer (2000); MS, Naval Postgraduate School, 1988, MA Naval War College.1993.

Joseph Hooper, Assistant Professor (2011); Ph. D., Tulane University, 2006.

Daphne Kapolka, Senior Lecturer (2000); Ph.D., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Gamani Karunasiri, Professor (2000); Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1984.

Fred Kruse, Research Professor (2009), Ph.D., Colorado School of Mines, 1987.

Andres Larraza, Associate Professor and Chairman (1994); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1987.

James H. Luscombe, Professor (1994); Ph.D., University of Chicago, 1983.

Richard Christopher Olsen, Professor (1987); Ph.D., University of California at San Diego, 1980.

Sebastian Osswald, Assistant Professor (2008); Ph. D., Drexel University/Ilmenau University of Technology, 2008.

Jonathan Phillips, Research Professor (2012); Ph.D., University of Madison Wisconsin, 1982

Joseph A. Rice, Research Professor (2007); MS, University of California at San Diego, 1990.

Craig F. Smith, Research Professor (2004); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1975.

Kevin B. Smith, Professor (1995); Ph.D., University of Miami, 1991.

Christopher Smithtro, Col, USAF, Associate Dean of GSEAS, Ph.D., Utah State University, 2004.

David M. Trask, Col, USAF (Ret.), MASINT Chair (2001); M.B.A., Embry-Riddle University, 1991.

Professors Emeriti:

Robert Louis Armstead, Associate Professor Emeritus (1964)*; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1964.

Fred Raymond Buskirk, Professor Emeritus (1960); Ph.D., Case Institute of Technology, 1958.

Alfred William Madison Cooper, Professor Emeritus (1957); Ph.D., The Queens University of Belfast, 1961

Harry Handler, Professor Emeritus (1958); Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles, 1955.

Otto Heinz, Professor Emeritus (1962); Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1954.

Xavier K Maruyama, Professor Emeritus (1987); Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1971.

James Vincent Sanders, Professor Emeritus (1961); Ph.D., Cornell University, 1961.

Gordon Everett Schacher, Professor Emeritus (1964); Ph.D., Rutgers, 1961.

Fred Schwirzke, Emeritus Professor (1967); Ph.D., University of Karlsruhe, 1959.

Donald Lee Walters, Emeritus Professor (1983); Ph.D., Kansas State University, 1971.

Karlheinz Edgar Woehler, Professor Emeritus (1962); Ph.D., University of Munich, 1962.

* The year of joining the Naval Postgraduate School faculty is indicated in parentheses.

Current expertise in the Department of Physics includes the following specializations:

Optical and Electromagnetic Signal Propagation, Detection and Sensor Systems.

Underwater Acoustics

Conventional weapons and their effects

Explosives and high strain rate deformation of materials

Free-Electron Laser Physics.

Directed Energy Weapons Physics.

Physical Acoustics.

Condensed-Matter, Device and Sensor Physics.

Micro-Electrical and Mechanical Systems (MEMS)

Autonomous Systems and Sensors

Energy

All of these specializations are of relevance to modern and future weapons technologies. The faculty supports an ongoing research program in these areas and student thesis topics are available in all of them.

Degree Requirements

The Department of Physics offers the Master of Science and the Ph.D. degrees in Physics and in Applied Physics. Upon approval by the department, courses taken at other institutions may be applied toward satisfying degree requirements to the extent allowed by the general Postgraduate School regulations.

Degree

A student is able to earn an academic degree listed below while enrolled in Combat Systems Science & Engineering (Curriculum 533), and Space Systems Engineering (Curriculum 591).

Master of Science in Physics

A candidate for the Master of Science in Physics degree must satisfactorily complete a program of study approved by the Chairman of the Physics Department that includes:

  1. A minimum of 32 quarter-hours of physics courses at the graduate level.
  2. Successful completion of the following specific courses (or their equivalents): PH3152 Analytical Mechanics, PH3360 Electromagnetic Waves, PH3991 Theoretical Physics, PH3782 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics, PH4353 Topics in Advanced Electricity and Magnetism, PH4656 Quantum Mechanics, plus a sequence of two graduate level physics courses, at least one of which must be at the 4000 level.
  3. Of the 32 quarter-hours the student must complete a minimum of 15 at the 4000 level. Upon approval of the Chairman of the Physics Department, a maximum of 4 hours of courses taken in another department may be applied toward satisfying the total physics requirement.
  4. An acceptable thesis advised by a member of the Physics Department.

The following specific course requirements (or equivalent) must be successfully completed for a student to earn the Master of Science in Physics degree:

1.

PH3152:

Analytical Mechanics

 

PH3360:

Electromagnetic Waves

 

PH3991:

Theoretical Physics

 

PH3782:

Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics.

 

PH4353:

Topics in Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

 

PH4656:

Quantum Mechanics

2.

In addition to the above, a graduate sequence containing at least two physics courses, at least one of which must be at the 4000 level.

All programs leading to the degree Master of Science in Physics must be approved by the Chairman of the Department of Physics.

Master of Science in Applied Physics

A candidate for the Master of Science in Applied Physics degree must satisfactorily complete a program of study approved by the Chairman of the Physics Department that includes:

  1. At least 32 quarter-hours of graduate level courses in physics, mathematics, and engineering including 20 at the 4000 level. Of these 32 hours, at least 20 will be physics courses including 12 at the 4000 level.
  2. At least one graduate level course in each of the following areas: mechanics, electromagnetism, and quantum physics. Students will demonstrate additional breadth by taking at least one 4000 level physics course outside their concentration area.
  3. An area of concentration containing a four-course sequence of graduate-level courses in addition to the above requirements, at least two at the 4000 level, in an area related to applied physics.
  4. An acceptable thesis advised or co-advised by a member of the Physics Department.

Master of Science in Combat Systems Technology

A candidate for the Master of Science in Combat Systems Technology degree must satisfactorily complete a program of study approved by the Chairman of the Physics Department that includes:

  1. A minimum of 32 quarter-hours of graduate work in Physics, Mathematics, and Engineering, with at least 18 quarter-hours at the 4000 level. Included in these hours must be at least 20 quarter-hours of graduate-level physics, including 12 quarter-hours at the 4000 level.
  2. Two approved sequences of courses related to combat systems technology. Each sequence must consist of at least four graduate-level courses with at least two courses at the 4000 level. A list of approved sequences is available from the Chairman.
  3. A thesis advised or coadvised by a member of the Physics Department.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Department of Physics offers the Ph.D. in several areas of specialization which currently include acoustics, electro-optics, free electron lasers, space physics, and theoretical physics.

Requirements for the degree may be grouped into three categories: courses, dissertation research, and examinations.

The required examinations are outlined under the general school requirements for the Ph.D. In particular, the department requires a preliminary examination to show evidence of acceptability as a doctoral student. This examination may be taken before or after commencement of graduate studies at NPS.

The department offers two options for the Ph.D.: major in Physics or major in Applied Physics. For the major in Physics, a minimum of 40 credit hours of physics courses at the 4000 level is required. The major in Applied Physics also requires 40 credit hours of 4000 level courses, but a portion of these hours may be taken in other departments in technical subjects related to physics.

A more detailed description of departmental requirements for the Ph.D. is contained in the booklet "Doctoral Study in Physics or in Applied Physics at the Naval Postgraduate School," available from the Academic Associate.

An applicant to the Ph.D. program who is not already a student at NPS should submit transcripts of previous academic and professional work, plus results of a current Graduate Record Examination (GRE) general test, to the Director of Admissions, Code 01C3, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California 93943-5100.

Doctor of Philosophy in Engineering Acoustics or Doctor of Engineering

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and the Department of Physics jointly sponsor an interdisciplinary program in Engineering Acoustics leading to either the Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Engineering degree. Areas of special strength in the departments are physical acoustics, underwater acoustics, acoustic signal processing, and acoustic communications. A noteworthy feature of this program is that a portion of the student's research may be conducted away from the Naval Postgraduate School at a cooperating laboratory or other federal government installation. The degree requirements and examinations are as outlined under the general school requirements for the doctorate degree. In addition to the school requirements, the departments require a preliminary examination to show evidence of acceptability as a doctoral student.

Physics Laboratories

The physics laboratories are equipped to carry on instruction and research work in acoustics, atomic and molecular physics, electro-optics, spectroscopy, laser physics, computational physics, optical propagation, and sensor physics.

The Optical Physics and Sensors Laboratory uses imaging, spectroscopic and sensing systems from far infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths, including instrumentation for seagoing, airborne and ground-based measurements.

The Acoustics Laboratory equipment includes a large anechoic chamber, a small reverberation chamber and a multiple-unit acoustics laboratory for student experimentation in acoustics in air. Sonar equipment, test and wave tanks and instrumentation for investigation in underwater sound comprise the Underwater Acoustics Laboratory. Also available is scale-model shallow-water waveguide. The Physical Acoustics Laboratories are equipped with a variety of modern data collection and processing equipment.

The Sensor Research Laboratory is capable of design, packaging and characterization of optical and infrared detectors using I-V measurement, Fourier transform spectroscopy and variable temperature photocurrent spectroscopy. Facilities exist for advanced microcharacterization, including cathodoluminescence, EBIC, X-ray analysis, and transport imaging in a scanning electron microscope with variable temperature capability.

Physics Course Descriptions

PC Courses

Place-holder text. Do not remove.

<PC Courses PC2013-PC4860>

PC2013 Introductory Applied Physics Laboratory (3-4) As Required

This course is an introduction to basic electronic test instrumentation and basic passive and active circuit components, with emphasis on extensive, practical hands-on exposure to laboratory hardware and devices. Included are the measurement and signal processing of analog signals and analog sensors/transducers. Operational amplifiers are introduced as building blocks of analog systems. Passive LRC filters and active filters are studied with an emphasis on applications. Some background in laboratory instrumentation and simple DC and AC circuit elements is assumed. Prerequisites: College-level basic physics and mathematics, plus simple electrical circuits (e.g., PH1322)

PC2911 Introduction to Computational Physics (3-2) As Required

An introduction to the role of computation in physics, with emphasis on the programming of current nonlinear physics problems. Assumes no prior programming experience. Includes a tutorial on the C programming language and Matlab, as well as an introduction to numerical integration methods. Computer graphics are used to present the results of physics simulations. Prerequisites: None.

PC3014 Intermediate Applied Physics Laboratory (3-4) Spring/Fall

This course continues with the instrumentation and signal processing topics begun in PC2013. Included are: controllable oscillators and RF modulation/demodulation techniques, basic electrical noise sources, device damage and failure modes, elementary digital logic gates and ICs. Also included are an overview of relevant microcomputer topics, such as digital encoding schemes, analog and digital interfacing, and serial communications and networking. At the discretion of the instructor, hands-on projects incorporating the course material may be assigned. Typical projects are: in-air sonar systems, radio receivers and transmitters, and opto-electronic communications links. Prerequisites: PC2013 and PC2911 or permission of instructor.

PC3172 Physics of Weapons Systems: Fluid Dynamics of Weapons, Shock Waves, Explosions (4-2) Winter/Summer

This course provides the basic physical principles applicable to air-borne and water-borne missiles, as well as the fluid dynamics of shocks and explosions. Topics include: Elements of thermodynamics, ideal fluid flow, elementary viscous flows, similitude and scaling laws, laminar and turbulent boundary layers, underwater vehicles, classical airfoil theory, supersonic flow, drag and lift of supersonic airfoils with applications to missiles, fluid dynamics of combustion, underwater explosions. Prerequisites: PH2151 and PH3991.

PC3200 Physics of Electromagnetic Sensors and Photonic Devices (4-1) Fall

An introductory survey of the physics of active and passive electromagnetic detection systems, primarily for Combat Systems students who do not elect to follow the Electromagnetic Sensors specialization track. Basic radiometry. Introduction to radar: ranging, pulse rate and range ambiguity, Doppler measurements, radar equation, target cross-sections, antenna beam patterns and phased arrays. Optoelectronic displays: CRTs, LEDs, LCDs, plasma displays. Introduction to lasers: transitions, population inversion, gain, resonators, longitudinal and transverse resonator modes, Q-switching, mode-locking, laser applications. Photodetection basics: noise and its characterization, photovoltaic, photoconductive and photoemissive detectors, image intensifiers, CCDs, night vision systems. Introduction to optical fibers and their applications. Prerequisites: PH2652, PH3292 and PH3352, or equivalent(s), or by permission of instructor.

PC3400 Survey of Underwater Acoustics (4-2) Spring

The physics of the generation, propagation, and detection of sound in the ocean. Topics include the acoustic wave equation and its limitations in fluids; plane, cylindrical, and spherical waves; the ray approximation; reflection of planes waves from plane boundaries; radiation of sound from circular piston, continuous line source, and linear array; speed of sound and absorption in the ocean; active and passive sonar equations; transmission-loss and detection-threshold models; normal mode propagation in the ocean; the parabolic equation approximation. Laboratory experiments include surface interference, noise analysis, normal modes, and acoustic waveguides. Prerequisites: PH2151 and PH3991.

PC3800 Survey of the Effects of Weapons (4-0) Spring

Physics of high‑velocity impact including the dynamical behavior of ductile and brittle materials and shock waves in solids. Physics of projectile penetration at high velocities. Shaped charges. Nuclear weapons effects including blast and shock thermal radiation, X‑rays, neutron flux, electromagnetic pulse, and radioactive fallout. Biological and chemical weapons effects, deployment, detection and countermeasures. Directed energy weapons and effects. Prerequisites: PC3172 and PH2652.

PC4015 Advanced Applied Physics Laboratory (3-4) Summer/ Winter

Students must integrate the material that they learned in the previous two courses (PC2013 and PC3014PC3014), along with additional material on embedded microprocessors and controls. A working introduction to control systems theory is provided and incorporated into an autonomous weapon system or "robot." Collaborative and autonomous engagement of the robots will be performed with RF modems and Ethernet communications. The principles of cooperative engagement will be emphasized. For the final exam, teams will compete in 2-on-1 or 2-on-2 engagement contests. These contests will test the students' assimilation of both the formal and the practical aspects of the course material. Prerequisites: PC2911 or other C/C++ programming course, plus PC2013 and PC3014.

PC4022 Combat Systems Capabilities (3-0) Spring

An advanced study of the technical capabilities of current acquisition programs within DoD. The course begins with an overview of the Navy acquisition community and the acquisition process. This is followed by weekly presentations by program managers and their technical experts. Overviews of each program are followed by an in-depth analysis of the critical physics and engineering issues, design trade-offs, risk areas, reliability issues, use of simulation and modeling, testing and evaluation rationale, interoperability concerns, software development issues, interfacing issues, etc. Topics of the course are dictated by the availability of program office personnel. Prerequisites: None. Classification: SECRET.

PC4860 Advanced Weapon Concepts (4-1) Spring/Fall

This course is a comprehensive overview of the components and underlying technologies of modern missile technologies. The course gives an introduction to missile guidance, missile aerodynamic design considerations, and missile propulsion technologies, followed by an introduction to the physics of modern conventional warhead designs for missile intercept and lethality and survivability considerations. Prerequisites: PC3172 and good comprehension of all aspects of mechanics and electromagnetics.

PH Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<PH Courses PH0810-PH2151>

PH0810 Thesis Research (0-8) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Every student conducting thesis research will enroll in this course.

PH0820 Integrating Project (0-12) Spring/Winter

The Naval Postgraduate School provides many opportunities for students to participate in campus-wide interdisciplinary projects. These projects encourage students to conceptualize systems which respond to current and future operational requirements. An integral part of the project involves working with other groups to understand and resolve issues involved with system integration. This course is available to students in the Combat Systems Science and Technology Curriculum who are participating in a campus-wide integrated project. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

PH0999 Physics Colloquium (No Credit) (0-1) Spring/Summer/Fall/Winter

Discussion of topics of current interest by NPS and outside guest speakers.

PH1000 The Nature and Structure of Physics (4-2) As Required

The concepts and laws of physics are explored from the ancient science of Aristotle and Ptolemy through the beginnings of classical physics with Galileo and Newton through the modern quantum and relativity physics of Schrodinger and Einstein to the physics of quarks and neutrino oscillations. Physics concepts are explored and their relevance to every day and military technologies is highlighted. The course is designed for students who will not take a physics based curriculum, but will encounter technologies impacted by physical concepts. The goal in this course is to convey an appreciation for physics as an intellectual endeavor and an understanding of the principles underlying modern technology. Prerequisites: None.

PH1001 Fundamentals of Physics I (4-2) As Required

This course meets for twelve hours per week for the first five and one-half weeks of the quarter. Topics covered are the fundamentals of calculus-based mechanics: Kinematics and dynamics of particles, statics of rigid bodies, work, energy, systems of particles, collisions, rotations of rigid bodies, angular momentum and torque, mechanical properties of solids, elasticity, harmonic motion, sound, fluids. Mathematical methods are reviewed as required. Prerequisites: Calculus with a passing grade.

PH1002 Fundamentals of Physics Ii (4-2) As Required

This course meets for twelve hours per week for the second five and one-half weeks of the quarter and covers electromagnetism: electric charge, electric and magnetic fields, forces on charges in fields, electric potential, Gauss' law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, resistance, capacitance, inductance, DC circuits, magnetic properties of matter, transient currents in circuits, complex AC circuits analysis, Maxwell's equations. Mathematical methods are reviewed as required. Prerequisites: PH1001 or equivalent.

PH1121 Mechanics (4-2) Summer/Winter

This course covers the fundamentals of calculus-based mechanics: Kinematics and dynamics of particles, statics of rigid bodies, work, energy, systems of particles, collisions, rotations of rigid bodies, angular momentum and torque, mechanical properties of solids, elasticity, harmonic motion, fluids. Prerequisites: A course in calculus or concurrent registration in a calculus course and consent of instructor.

PH1322 Electromagnetism (4-2) Spring/Fall

Basic electromagnetism: electric charge, electric and magnetic fields, forces on charges in fields, electric potential, Gauss's law, Ampere's law, Faraday's law, resistance, capacitance, inductance, DC and AC circuits, magnetic properties of matter, transient currents in circuits, Maxwell's equations, electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PH1121 or consent of instructor.

PH1623 Thermodynamics and Wave Phenomena (4-2) As Required

An introduction to thermodynamics and wave phenomena. The Laws of Thermodynamics, calorimetry, thermal effects, kinetic theory of gases, heat transfer, the Carnot cycle, heat engine and refrigerator efficiency are studied followed by the general properties of wave phenomena, vibrations, acoustics, and geometrical and physical optics. Prerequisites: PH1121, PH1322 or consent of instructor.

PH1992-1998 Special Topics in Elementary Physics (V-0) As Required

Study in one of the fields of elementary physics selected to meet the needs of students without sufficient undergraduate physics to meet the prerequisites of their curriculum. The course may be conducted either as a lecture course or as supervised reading. Prerequisites: Consent of the Department Chairman.

PH2001 Research Seminar in Physics (1-0) Spring/Fall

This course will present the research expertise of the physics faculty. The course is designed to support Combat Systems Science and Technology students in their second quarter in the selection of their concentration and area for thesis research. The course is given in the Pass/Fail mode. Prerequisites: CSS&T students in their second quarter or consent of the Academic Associate.

PH2151 Particle Mechanics (4-1) Spring/Fall

After a review of the fundamental concepts of kinematics and dynamics, this course concentrates on those two areas of dynamics of simple bodies which are most relevant to applications in Combat Systems: vibrations and projectile motion. Topics include: damped and driven oscillations, projectile motion with atmospheric friction, satellite orbits, and rotating coordinate systems. Prerequisites: PH1121 or equivalent; MA2121 or equivalent course in ordinary differential equations (may be taken concurrently).

<PH Courses PH2203-PH3998>

PH2203 Topics in Basic Physics: Waves and Optics (4-0) Fall

A course to provide the physical background to wave motion and optics for students in the Information Warfare and Electronic Warfare curricula, and to provide applications of analytical techniques to physical problems. Areas covered are harmonic motion— differential equations, complex notation, damped vibration and resonance; wave motion—properties of waves, electromagnetic waves, light waves; geometrical and wave optics. Prerequisites: MA1115, MA1116, MA2121.

PH2351 Electromagnetism (4-1) Summer/Winter

Electrostatic fields in vacuum and dielectrics, electrostatic energy and capacitors. The magnetic field of steady currents, Biot-Savart and Ampere's Laws, vector potential, magnetic properties of matter. Faraday's law. Magnetic energy. Maxwell's Equations. Prerequisites: PH1322, MA1116, MA2121.

PH2514 Introduction to the Space Environment (4-0) As Required

Plasma concepts. Solar structure and magnetic field, particle and electromagnetic emissions from the sun, the geomagnetic field, and the magnetosphere, radiation belts, structure and properties of the earth's upper atmosphere, ionosphere, implications of environmental factors for spacecraft design. Prerequisites: A course in basic electricity and magnetism.

PH2652 Modern Physics (4-1) Winter/Summer (Fall for SE Students)

An introduction to modern physics. Theory of relativity; blackbody radiation; photoelectric effect; matter waves; atomic spectral lines; Bohr model of the atom; uncertainty relations (position-momentum and time-energy); the Schrödinger equation (time dependent and independent); probability interpretation; infinite, finite and parabolic potential wells; tunneling (single and double barriers); electron spin and exclusion principle; the periodic table; molecular energy levels; quantum statistics (Bose-Einstein, Fermi-Dirac). Prerequisites: PH1623.

PH2724 Thermodynamics (4-0) Winter/Summer

Equations of state; the concepts of temperature, heat and work; the first law of thermodynamics; heat engines and refrigerators; entropy and the second law of thermodynamics; thermodynamic potentials; phase equilibrium; kinetic theory; equipartition theorem; transport phenomena. Prerequisites: PH1121, PH1322, MA1116.

PH3002 Non-Acoustic Sensor Systems (4-0) Fall

This course covers the physical principles underlying the operation of a number of operational and proposed non-acoustic sensor systems. Geomagnetism, magnetometers and gradiometers, MAD signatures, optical and IR transmission in the atmosphere and in sea water. Image Converter, FLIR and radar systems for USW. Exotic detection schemes. Prerequisites: PH1322.

PH3052 Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems (4-0) As Required

This interdisciplinary course explores the physical principles underlying the sensor systems needed for satellites and tactical aircraft, as well as limitations imposed by the atmosphere and operating environment on these systems and their communication links. Topics include: satellite orbits, the satellite environment, ionospheric interactions and atmospheric propagation, phased array and pulsed compressed radars, imaging synthetic aperture and inverse synthetic aperture radars, noise resources, thermal radiation, principles of semiconductor devices, optical and infrared imaging detector systems, and their resolution limitations and bandwidth requirements. Prerequisites: Basic physics class. Must be familiar with the concepts of energy and wave motion.

PH3119 Oscillation and Waves (4-2) Summer

An introductory course designed to present mechanics to students studying acoustics. Kinematics, dynamics, and work and energy consideration for the free, damped, and driven oscillators. The wave equation for transverse vibration of a string, ideal and realistic boundary conditions, and normal modes. Longitudinal and transverse waves in bars.  Transverse waves on rectangular and circular membranes. Vibrations of plates. Laboratory periods include problem sessions and experiments on introduction to experimental techniques and handling of data; the simple harmonic oscillator analog; transverse waves on a string; and transverse, longitudinal, and torsional waves on a bar. Prerequisites: PH3991 or equivalent.

PH3152 Analytical Mechanics (4-0) Summer/Winter

Dynamics of systems of particles, including rockets. Hamilton's principle, Lagrangian dynamics, and the role of physical symmetry. Velocity-dependent potentials. The inertia tensor and rotational dynamics of rigid bodies. Small-amplitude oscillations of systems of particles, and normal modes. Prerequisites: PH2151.

PH3204 Electro-Optic Principles and Devices (4-2) As Required

The first course of a two-course sequence for the Information Warfare/Electronic Warfare Curricula. This course treats the principles and capabilities of military electro-optic and infrared systems in a Range Equation context. Topics include: target signatures and backgrounds, optical transmitter and receiver characteristics, MTF and OTF, atmospheric propagation and propagation codes, laser radiation and types, fiber optics, detectors, focal plane arrays, D* and NET, principles of imaging, and sensor performance parameters. Laboratory work provides hands-on familiarity with modem infrared devices. Prerequisites: PH1322, MA3139 or equivalent.

PH3280 Introduction to MEMS Design (3-3) As Required

This is a 4.5 credit hour class introducing the students to Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS). Topics include material considerations for MEMS and microfabrication fundamentals. Surface, bulk and non-silicon micromachining. Forces and transduction; forces in micro-nano-domains and actuation techniques. Case studies of MEMS based microsensor, microactuator and microfluidic devices. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) of MEMS devices and small group design project. Prerequisites: basic understanding of electrical and mechanical structures: EC2200 or MS2201 or PH1322 or consent of instructor.

PH3292 Applied Optics (4-2) Spring

An intermediate-level course in optics. Review of basic geometric and physical optics concepts. Laws of reflection and refraction at interfaces. Imaging systems and aberrations. Polarization; Jones matrix methods; electro-optical modulation. Matrix methods for paraxial ray tracing and optical systems analysis. Two-beam and multiple-beam interference; Young's double slit experiment, multiple-slit systems and diffraction gratings; Michelson's interferometer; Fabry-Perot interferometer. Huygens-Fresnel principle; Fraunhofer diffraction; Fresnel diffraction. Prerequisites: PH3352.

PH3352 Electromagnetic Waves (4-0)

Maxwell's equations, energy density and Poynting vector, boundary conditions. Polarization. Propagation of uniform plane waves in vacuum, dielectrics, conducting media (with emphasis on sea water) and low-density neutral plasmas. Reflection and refraction at plane dielectric and conducting boundaries, at normal and oblique incidence. Rectangular waveguides. Prerequisites: PH2351.

PH3360 Electromagnetic Wave Propagation (4-1) Summer/Winter

Introduction to vector fields and the physical basis of Maxwell's equations. Wave propagation in a vacuum, in dielectrics and conductors, and in the ionosphere. Reflection and refraction at the interface between media. Guided waves. Radiation from a dipole. Prerequisites: MA2121 and a course in basic electricity and magnetism.

PH3401 Introduction to the Sonar Equations (3-0) Spring/Fall

A discussion of the fundamental principles behind each term of the sonar equations. Starting with the acoustic wave equation and the basic properties of sound waves, topics include ray acoustics, normal mode theory, simple transmission loss models, coherent and incoherent sound, directivity, beamforming, scattering, noise sources and properties, and the detection threshold. This course can be taken online as part of the ASW Certificate program. Prerequisites: Single-variable calculus.

PH3451 Fundamental Acoustics (4-2) Fall

Development of, and solutions to, the acoustic wave equation in fluids; propagation of plane, spherical and cylindrical waves in fluids; sound pressure level, intensity, and specific acoustic impedance; normal and oblique incidence reflection and transmission from plane boundaries; transmission through a layer; image theory and surface interference; sound absorption and dispersion for classical and relaxing fluids; acoustic behavior of sources and arrays, acoustical reciprocity, continuous line source, plane circular piston, radiation impedance, and the steered line array; transducer properties, sensitivities, and calibration. Laboratory experiments include longitudinal waves in an air-filled tube, surface interference, properties of underwater transducers, three-element array, speed of sound in water, and absorption in gases. Prerequisites: PH3119 and PH3991 or equivalent.

PH3452 Underwater Acoustics (4-2) Winter

This course is a continuation of PH3451. Lumped acoustic elements and the resonant bubble; introduction to simple transducers; normal modes in rectangular and cylindrical enclosures; steady-state response of acoustic waveguides of constant cross section, propagating evanescent modes, and group and phase speeds; transmission of sound in the ocean, the Eikonal Equation and necessary space conditions for ray theory, and refraction and ray diagrams; sound propagation in the mixed layer, the convergence zone, and the deep sound channel; passive sonar equation, ambient noise and doppler effect and bandwidth considerations; active sonar equations, target strength and reverberation. Laboratory experiments include Helmholtz resonators, normal modes in rectangular, cylindrical, and spherical enclosures, water-filled waveguide, noise analysis, impedance of a loudspeaker. Prerequisites: PH3451.

PH3458 Noise, Shock and Vibration Control (4-2) As Required

The application of the principles of acoustics and mechanics to the problems of controlling noise, vibration and mechanical shock. Topics include linear mechanical vibrations; introduction to vibrations of nonlinear systems; damping mechanisms; vibration and shock isolation; noise generation and control; effects of noise on man; application to problems of naval interest, such as ship quieting and industrial noise control. Prerequisites: A course in acoustics.

PH3479 Physics of Underwater Weapons (4-0) Spring

Navier-Stokes Equations and their exact solutions; Reynolds and other numbers and dynamic similarity. Incompressible inviscid hydrodynamics including flow about a circular cylinder and airfoil theory. Prandtl's boundary layer theory: the laminar boundary layer on a flat plate; effects of pressure gradients; separation of a laminar boundary; streamline bodies. Hydrodynamics stability and transition to a turbulent boundary layer; velocity profile in the turbulent boundary layer; drag on a flat plate. Blunt bodies. Drag reduction. Supercavitation. Torpedoes: drag and lift; dynamics of a straight-running torpedo; power plants; propulsors. Review of thermodynamics. Subsonic and supersonic flows. The converging-diverging nozzle. Shock waves: Rankine-Hugoniot equations; stationary normal shocks in air and water. Underwater explosions: detonation; scaling laws for the shock wave; the bubble and it interaction with surfaces. Shaped charges. Prerequisite: MA3139 or equivalent.

PH3655 Semiconductor Device Physics (4-0) Spring/Fall

Formation of solids, crystal structure of semiconductors, X-ray diffraction, lattice vibrations, defects, electrical and thermal properties, free electron model, Seebeck effect, thermionic emission, photoemission, effects of periodic potential, formation of energy bands, E-k relation, band structure of Si and GaAs, electrons and holes, doping and impurity levels, mobility, diffusion, continuity equation, Schottky and ohmic contacts, optical properties, Formation of p-n junction, I-V characteristics, bipolar and field effect transistors, fabrication technology, semiconductor alloys, quantum effect devices, fundamental limits to semiconductor device technology. Prerequisites: PH2652.

PH3700 Fundamentals of Energy (4-0) Winter

This course provides a study of the underlying science of all aspects of energy, including energy availability, production, conversion, storage, and delivery. Topics covered will emphasize basic physics and chemistry of: work, power, units and unit conversion; fossil fuels, heat engines and power plants; solar thermal and solar voltaic sources; wind, hydro, and tidal power; geothermal and biomass energy; transportation, including electric and hybrid vehicles, batteries and fuel cells; nuclear energy; and energy conservation. Quantitative problem solving will be emphasized, including development of tools for energy systems analysis. Student will present briefs addressing energy topics with DoD/Don relevance at the end of the course. Prerequisite: Introductory physics at the algebra/trigonometry level.

PH3782 Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics (4-0) As Required

Entropy, temperature, Boltzmann factor and Gibbs factor are developed from a quantum point of view. Blackbody radiation, chemical potential, partition function, Gibbs sum and applications to an ideal gas are covered. Fermi-Dirac and Bose-Einstein statistics and applications to degenerate systems; Gibbs free energy, Helmholtz free energy, enthalpy, kinetic theory, phase transformations, chemical reactions. Prerequisites: PH2724 and PH2652.

PH3855 Nuclear Physics (4-0) As Required

This is the first in a sequence of graduate specialization courses on nuclear weapons and their effects. This course deals with the underlying principles of nuclear physics, including nuclear forces, models, stability, reactions and decay processes, and interaction of high energy particles with matter. Prerequisites: PH3152, PH3360, and PH2652 or equivalents.

PH3858 Railgun Technology (2-0) As Required

This course provides a basic introduction to the fundamentals of railgun theory, design, and practice. Requirements for both the Army and Navy applications are discussed. Acceleration of projectiles, pulsed power sources for the railgun, barrel life, mechanical stress, projectile design, and thermal considerations will be discussed

PH3991 Theoretical Physics (4-1) Spring/Fall

Discussion of heat flow, electromagnetic waves, elastic waves, and quantum-mechanical waves; applications of orthogonal functions to electromagnetic multipoles, angular momentum in quantum mechanics, and to normal modes on acoustic and electromagnetic systems. Applications of complex analysis to Green Function in quantum mechanics and electromagnetism. Application of Fourier series and transforms to resonant systems. Applications of partial differential equation techniques to equation of physics. Prerequisites: Basic physics, multivariable calculus, vector analysis, Fourier series, complex numbers, and ordinary differential equations.

PH3992-3998 Special Topics in Intermediate Physics (Variable Hours 1-0 to 4-0.) (V-0) As Required

Study in one of the fields of intermediate physics and related applied areas selected to meet special needs or interests of students. The course may be conducted as a seminar or supervised reading in different topics. Prerequisites: A 2000 level course appropriate to the subject to be studied, and consent of the Department Chairman. The course may also be taken on a Pass/Fail basis, provided the student has requested so at the time of enrollment.

<PH Courses PH4001-PH4371>

PH4001 Physics Thesis Presentation (1-0) As Required

This course provides students with the opportunity to develop the ability to deliver a briefing on a technical subject by presenting their thesis to other students and faculty. This course is required of all students working for a degree from the Physics Department and of all Combat Systems students not presenting their thesis in some other department. Prerequisites: At least two quarters of thesis research.

PH4055 Free Electron Laser Physics (3-0) As Required

The physical principles describing free electron lasers are explained with applications to ship defense from sea-skimming missiles, and to new radiation sources for scientific research. Theory is applied to experimental facilities around the world. Topics include optical resonator design, general laser concepts, laser beam propagation, relativistic electron dynamics, phase-space analysis, and numerical simulation. Prerequisites: PH4353, E&M.

PH4056 Radiofrequency Weapons, High Power Microwaves, and Ultrawide Band Systems (4-0) As Required

This course outlines High-Power Microwave (HPM) and radiofrequency (RF) weapons technology, design, and progress including sources, systems integration, and effects of these emerging capabilities at the SECRET/U.S. ONLY level. Definitions and terminology, and calculations concerning the effects upon electronics, such as burnout and upset; narrowband and wideband modulation; and RF radiation, propagation, and coupling will be presented. The generation of high-power electromagnetic fields in compact sources, testing, EMI/EMC fratricide/suicide issues, and transition to employment as operational systems in a variety of applications will be described. Intelligence concerning the growing RF weapons threat is analyzed with particular attention paid to IW, terrorism, and asymmetrical threat aspects of these developments. Prerequisites: PH3352, EC3600, or EO3602. Classification: SECRET/U.S. only.

PH4153 Advanced Classical Mechanics I (4-1) As Required

The first course in a two-course sequence covering classical mechanics at the advanced graduate level. Newtonian mechanics of single-particle and two-body central force systems, including orbital motion and scattering. Constraints, Lagrangian dynamics and generalized coordinates. Euler's formulation of rigid body mechanics. Small oscillations and systems of coupled oscillators. Prerequisites: PH3152 and PH3991 or equivalents.

PH4154 Advanced Classical Mechanics II (4-1) As Required

The second course in a two-course sequence covering classical mechanics at the advanced graduate level. Kinematics and dynamics of relativistic systems from the Lagrangian perspective. Hamilton's equations of motion and conservation laws. Poison brackets and commutation. Hamilton-Jacobi formulation of mechanics and action-angle variables. Introduction to nonlinear dynamics and chaotic systems. Introduction to classical perturbation theory. Prerequisites: PH4153 or equivalent.

PH4162 Mechanics of Continua (3-0) As Required

The foundations of fluid mechanics presented in the tensor formulation. Scalars, vectors, and tensors; tensor differential and integral calculus; the stress tensor and rate of deformation tensor; principal values, deviators, and other invariants; fundamental laws: conservation of mass, linear momentum, angular momentum, and energy; constitutive equations; non-Newtonian fluids; Visco-Plastic materials. Prerequisites: PC3172 or equivalent.

PH4171 Physics of Explosives (4-0) Summer

The goals of the course are to provide in-depth and advanced understanding of explosives from theoretical and practical standpoints, to formulate the bases for evaluating competitive and alternative explosive systems, and to provide criteria for crisis management. This course covers advanced topics in explosive physics and chemistry: Molecular energetics of the explosive molecule including molecular orbital and valence bonding and resonance stabilization concepts and practical implications of sensitivity and energy potential, oxygen balance and thermodynamic, reaction rate theory, hot-spot theory, shock physics and detonation theory. Special topics in explosive technology and application as applied to metal driving, mine detection and neutralization, chemical and biological dissemination, and computational modeling are offered per student's interests. Prerequisites: PC3172 and PH2652.

PH4209 EO/IR Systems and Countermeasures (3-2) As Required

This unclassified course for students in interdisciplinary curricula treats the military applications of countermeasures to electro-optic systems, including IR and EO seekers and trackers, surveillance and missile and laser warning systems, and laser rangers and designators. Scanning FLIR and IRST systems and array applications will be included. Signature suppression and generic active and passive countermeasure approached will be discussed including decoys and active IRCM. Laboratory work will deal with EO/IR devices and possible countermeasure techniques. Prerequisites: PH3204, MA3139, or equivalent.

PH4253 Sensors, Signals, and Systems (4-2) As Required

This course treats the physical phenomena and practical problems involved in sensor systems for electromagnetic signals in the EO/IR range. Topics included are: optical modulation, nonlinear optics, acousto-optics; atmospheric molecular absorption characteristics and mechanisms of detectors for optical and infrared radiation, noise in detectors, cooling systems; image intensifiers, television and FLIR systems; detecting, tracking and homing systems; signal sources, target signatures and backgrounds; laser target designators, laser radars, the range equation. The laboratory will include experiments related to this material as well as to that of the preceding course, PH3252. Prerequisites: PH2652, PH3292, and PH3352 or equivalent.

PH4254 Thermal Imaging and Surveillance Systems (4-0) As Required

This course is intended as a capstone course on EO/IR systems for the Combat Systems Science and Technology Curriculum, or the Electronic Warfare Systems Technology curriculum. It addresses the system analysis and technology of infrared imaging (FLIR) and search/track systems (IRST), including the derivation of system performance measures such as Minimum Detectable Temperature Difference (MDT), and Minimum Resolvable Temperature Difference (MRTD) in terms of the optics, scanner, detectors, display, and human operator characteristics. Operational Performance Prediction codes and Tactical Decision Aids (TDAs) will be analyzed for current and developmental Forward Looking InfraRed (FLIR) Systems, and comparable codes for IRSTs discussed. Criteria for target detection and transference of contrast will be compared. Integrated Focal Plane Array Technology will be explored for application to second/third generation FLIR and Staring Imager development. Prerequisites: PH4253 or PH4209 or consent of instructor.

PH4271 Lasers, Optoelectronics and Electro-Optics I (4-1) Fall

The first course in a comprehensive two-course sequence covering the physics of lasers, optoelectronic and electro-optical devices. Review of Atomic and molecular energy levels, time-dependent perturbation theory, radiative transitions, transition rates. Einstein A and B coefficients for spontaneous and stimulated radiative transitions, blackbody radiation. Optical attenuation and amplification, rate equations. Basic laser theory, gain saturation, homogeneous and inhomogeneous effects. Optical resonators, laser modes, coherence. Q-switching, mode locking, pulse compression, laser pumping and tuning mechanisms. Gaussian beams. Introduction to multiple-mode and single mode optical fibers. Prerequisites: PH3292, PH3352, PH2652, or equivalent(s).

PH4272 Lasers, Optoelectronics and Electro-Optics II (4-1) Summer

The second course in a two-course sequence covering the physics of lasers, optoelectronic and electro-optical devices. Physics of optoelectronic detection, noise, detector figures-of-merit. Photovoltaic, photoconductive, bolometric and charge-coupled (CCD) detector families. 1-D and 2-D (focal-pave array) detectors. Image intensifiers and night vision systems. Gaussian beams. Physics of optical fibers and their practical applications. Optical properties of anisotropic media and their applications, electro-optical effects and modulators. Introduction to nonlinear optics, optical harmonic generation, parametric amplification and optical heterodyning. Prerequisites: PH3292, PH3352 and PH2652, or equivalent(s).

PH4273 Physics of Advanced Imaging Systems (4-2) Fall

A course in the physical optics of advanced imaging techniques, Introduction to Fourier optics, spatial frequency, sampling, and transfer function concepts, Beam diffraction from the linear systems/Fourier transform perspective, Wavefront coherence and its characterization, Optical transfer functions, modulation transfer functions and diffraction limited resolution of optical and RF systems, Performance characterization of imaging systems, Correlation-based reception in active systems, Computerized tomography and other projection-based imaging methods (including SAR and ISAR). Prerequisites: PH3292 or equivalent; PH4272 is recommended as a concurrent course.

PH4274 Physics of Active Electromagnetic Detection and Engagement (4-1) Summer

A course in the physics of radar and high-power RF/microwave systems. Radiometry and the propagation of electromagnetic energy.  Radar equation and its relationship to radiometry. Noise and minimum detection threshold criteria. Range gating, scanning and range ambiguity. Target cross-section and polarization effects. Doppler techniques. Correlation analysis of signals and signal coherence. Synthetic aperture methods. Absorption and scattering of RF/microwave beams by the atmosphere. Modulation and demodulation techniques, pulse compression, chirping and signal recovery. Ultra-wideband and monopulse radars. Tracking and jamming. Propagation of high-power beams and thermal blooming/defocusing in the atmosphere. Introduction to RF/microwave weapons and their effects. Prerequisites: PH2351 and PH3292.

PH4280 Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design II (2-4) As Required

Same as ME4780 and EC4280. This is the second course in Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) Design. This course will expose students to advanced topics on material considerations for MEMS, microfabrication techniques, forces in the micro- and nano-domains, and circuits and systems issues. Case studies of MEMS-based microsensors, microactuators, and microfluidic devices will be discussed. The laboratory work includes computer aided design (CAD) and characterization of existing MEMS devices. The grades will be based on exams, lab projects, and a group design project. Prerequisites: ME/EC/PH3280 or ME3780 or consent of instructor.

PH4353 Topics in Advanced Electricity and Magnetism (4-0) As Required

Topics selected from: Electromagnetic radiation, including radiation from antennas and accelerating particles, and radiation scattering from charged particles. Additional topics may include Cerenkov radiation, free electron lasers, and the relativistic formulation of electrodynamics. Prerequisites: PH3152, PH3352 and PH3991.

PH4354 Advanced Electromagnetic Radiation (4-0) As Required

This course gives an in-depth coverage of scattering of electromagnetic radiation in the microwave to optical region, from randomly distributed scatterers in the atmosphere and the propagation of optical radiation in turbulent randomly fluctuating atmosphere, which has a most significant application in the high energy laser weapon program. Prerequisites: PH3352, PH3991.

PH4371 Classical Electrodynamics (3-0) As Required

Tensors in special relativity. Classical relativistic electromagnetic field theory. Lorentz electron theory. Prerequisites: PH4353 and familiarity with the special theory of relativity and Lagrangian mechanics.

<PH Courses PH4409-PH4760>

PH4409 Engineering Acoustics Capstone Project (2-4) Summer

(Same as EO4409) The capstone project provides DL students with an opportunity to apply the principles and techniques covered in the coursework to a current problem of interest. Students will formulate a novel research question, conduct a literature review, analyze the problem using theory, experiment, and/or simulations, draw conclusions, and effectively communicate the results. This course satisfies the capstone requirement for students pursuing the non-thesis degree option. Students pursuing the thesis degree option are encouraged to use their work in this course towards their thesis. Prerequisite: PH4454, PH4455, and EC4450 or equivalents.

PH4410 Advanced Acoustics Laboratory (1-6) As Required

Advanced laboratory projects in acoustics. Through the performance of experiments drawn from diverse fields of acoustics, the student is introduced to the problems and opportunities of acoustics research. For each experiment, the student is guided through the scientific literature on the subject, the construction of the equipment, the collection and analysis of the data, and the writing of a research report. Prerequisites: PH3451.

PH4453 Scattering and Fluctuation of Sound in the Ocean (4-0) As Required

An advanced treatment of the effects of variations of the ocean and its boundaries on ocean noise and the scattering and fluctuation of sound. Topics include: multiple radiation fields and noise sources in the sea, coherence and incoherence, probability density functions, the Hemholtz integral and general scattering formalism, scattering from objects, correlations and frequency spectra of sound scattered from rough boundaries, fluctuations associated with variability in the medium. Prerequisites: PH3452 or consent of instructor.

PH4454 Sonar Transducer Theory and Design (4-2) Winter

A treatment of the fundamental phenomena basic to the design of sonar transducers, specific examples of their application and design exercises. Topics include piezoelectric, magnetostrictive and hydro mechanical effects.  Laboratory includes experiments on measurement techniques, properties of transducer materials, characteristics of typical navy transducers, and a design project. A field trip to visit one or more transducer manufacturers is normally scheduled during the course. Prerequisites: PH3452 (may be taken concurrently).

PH4455 Sound Propagation in the Ocean (4-0) Spring

An advanced treatment of the subject. Topics include: reflection of spherical waves from ocean boundaries; normal mode propagation of sound; inhomogeneous wave equation and the point source in cylindrical coordinates; shallow water channel with fluid and solid bottoms; the deep sound channel and the WKB approximation; range-dependent channels; adiabatic normal modes and the parabolic equation; multi-path propagation; application to matched field processing and source localization. Prerequisites: PH3452 or consent of instructor.

PH4459 Nonlinear Oscillations and Waves (4-0) As Required

This is a self-contained course that emphasizes theory, classroom demonstrations, physical intuition, and applications of nonlinear oscillations and nonlinear waves. Subjects include the following: (i) Nonlinear oscillations: free motion, driven motion (direct, parametric, and maintained drives), quasiperiodicity, and chaos. (ii) Nonlinear dispersive waves (e.g. flexural waves on bars and plates, optical waves in fibers, and surface waves on water): self-interaction, wave-wave scattering, wave turbulence, and solitons. (iii) Nonlinear dispersionless waves, with concentration on acoustics: distortion, shock waves, parametric arrays, radiation pressure, levitation, jetting and streaming, acoustic cavitation, and sonoluminescence. Prerequisites: PH1121 and differential equations.

PH4656 Quantum Mechanics (4-1) Spring/ Fall

Free particles and wave packets, the uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation, eigenstates and eigen functions, stationary and scattering states, identical particles and the exclusion principle, atomic energy levels, quantum theory of angular momentum, hydrogen atom, coupling of angular momentum with spin, the periodic table, nuclear structure and radioactivity; fission and fusion, time independent perturbation theory, time dependent perturbation theory; selection rules for dipole radiation, magnetic effects (MRI, GMR etc.), quantum computing. Prerequisites: PH2652, PH3152, PH3991.

PH4661 Plasma Physics I (4-0) As Required

Introduction to plasma physics; single particle dynamics (orbit theory), MHD fluid theory, electromagnetic waves, instability, diffusion, and breakdown in gases. Prerequisites: PH3352 or equivalent.

PH4662 Plasma Physics II (3-0) As Required

A continuation of Plasma Physics I. Applications of the hydromagnetic equations to the study of macroscopic motions of plasma; classification of plasma instabilities; kinetic theory, the Boltzmann equation and the macroscopic-momentum transport equation; plasma oscillations and Landau damping; nonlinear effects, shock waves, radiations from plasma, sheath theory. Prerequisites: PH4661 or consent of instructor.

PH4670 Quantum Computing (4-0) Spring

This interdisciplinary survey course explores the evolution and direction of quantum computing technology. Topics include quantum circuits, quantum algorithms (including factoring and search), and quantum key distribution. Jointly listed as CS4670. Prerequisites: familiarity with basic notions of computing, quantum theory, and linear algebra, consistent with the material covered in CS3000, PH2652, MA3042 or PH3991.

PH4760 Solid State Physics (4-0) As Required

Fundamental theory dealing with solids: crystals, binding energy, lattice vibration, dislocations and mechanical properties, free electron theory, band theory, properties of semi-conductors and insulators, magnetism. Prerequisites: PH3655, PH3782.

<PH Courses PH4771-PH5810>

PH4771 Advanced Statistical Physics (4-0) As Required

Review of thermodynamics. Phase transitions and critical exponents. Ginzburg-Landau theory. Stochastic dynamics and Brownian motion: master equation, Langevin equation, and Fokker-Planck equation. Phase space motion, Liouville theorem. BBGKY hierarchy. Boltzmann equation, H theorem, and entropy. Kinetic theory. Review of equilibrium statistical mechanics and ensemble theory. Information theory. Bose-Einstein condensation, photon gas. Degenerate Fermions: heavily doped semiconductors, degeneracy pressure. Paramagnetism, Curie theory. Ising model of magnetism. Glauber model of time-dependent Ising spins. Widom, Kadanoff scaling theories. Renormalization theory. Onsager relations, linear response theory, fluctuation-dissipation theorem. Prerequisites: PH3782.

PH4857 Terminal Ballistics and Shock Physics (4-0) Summer

This course explores the key physics underlying the lethality of conventional weapons. Particular focus is given to two broad areas: armor penetration and damage from shock and blast waves. Detailed topics covered in the course include: an overview of modern warheads; basic mechanics of materials; high strain-rate deformation of materials under intense loading; terminal ballistics of projectiles, ranging from small-caliber rounds up to shaped charge jets; shock waves in solids and spall phenomena; blast waves from explosive charges and nuclear weapons; and underwater weapons effects. Prerequisites: PC3172, PH3352, PH2151.

PH4858 Electric Ship Weapon Systems (4-1) Fall

This course teaches the physics and engineering concepts underlying two specific weapon systems currently in development for future US Navy electric ships: directed energy free electron/solid state lasers and the electromagnetic railgun. The directed energy topics include current program reviews, laser target damage, laser beam propagation through the atmosphere, thermal blooming, and the physics of free electron and solid state lasers. For the railgun, topics include electromagnetic gun theory and critical design issues including power conditioning, barrel design, barrel life, projectile design, and system cooling. Prerequisites: PH3352.

PH4859 Technical Aspects of Weapon Proliferation, Control and Disposal (3-0) As Required

This course address technical issues of detection of nuclear weapon materials, covert explosions, disposition of weapon grade material and nuclear reactor fuel, control and disposition of chemical and biological weapons, policy issues of arms proliferation and arms control. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor.

PH4860 Nuclear Warfare Analysis (4-0) As Required

This final course in the nuclear weapons effects graduate specialization sequence deals with technical aspects of strategic and tactical nuclear war. Effects which nuclear weapons explosion environments have on various defense platforms and systems are considered, together with methods of hardening to reduce system vulnerability in each of the effected areas: blast and shock, thermal radiation, transient effects on electronics. EMP, biological effects from contamination, atmospheric and ionospheric effects on communication, detection and surveillance systems. Prerequisites: PH4171 Classification: SECRET.

PH4911 Simulation of Physical and Weapon Systems (3-2) Winter

The role of computation physics in modern weapons development and combat simulations is studied. The programming language is C within the UNIX, Apple, or Windows operating systems. Applications emphasize physical principles of weapons development, systems engineering, and the use of graphics. Subject matter includes random number distributions, projectile and fragment dispersion, missile defense, free electron laser simulation, laser beam propagation in a turbulent atmosphere, thermal blooming, diffraction and numerical integration methods. Optional topics include molecular dynamics in solids, liquids, and gases, wave propagation in various media, chaos, and quantum mechanical wave functions. Prerequisites: PO2911.

PH4943 Relativistic Quantum Mechanics (3-0) As Required

The goal of this course is to expose the NPS student to the basic concepts in one of physics' most successful and fundamental formalisms - quantum electrodynamics (QED). The basic topics reviewed are quantum mechanics, electromagnetism, and special relativity. Then, these fundamental theories are extended and combined into QED. Throughout the course the relativistic free electron laser is used as an application of the basic theories encountered. Prerequisites: PH4656, PH2652 (PH4984 recommended).

PH4984 Advanced Quantum Physics (4-0) As Required

Quantum mechanics in the Dirac format. Angular momentum, spin, and spin resonance. Additional topics may include group theoretical applications to selection rules and crystal fields, variational principles, self-consistent fields in the many-electron atom, scattering theory, and polyatomic molecules. Prerequisites: PH3152 and PH4656.

PH4991 Relativity and Cosmology (4-0) As Required

This course is a graduate level introduction to the current thought on the origin of space, time and matter. Topics covered are: The discovery of the cosmic evolution, Description of space in Newtonian and Einsteinian terminology, Kinematics and Dynamics of the Einstein cosmological models, the thermal history of the universe, the very early universe, the problems of a possible quantum origin of the universe and the possible future of the universe. Prerequisites: PH2652, PH3152, PH3360, PH3991.

PH4992/4998 Special Topics in Advanced Physics (Variable Hours 1-0 To 4-0) (V-0) As Required

Study in one of the fields of advanced physics and related applied areas selected to meet special needs or interests of students. The course may be conducted as a seminar or supervised reading. The course carries a letter grade and may be repeated in different topics. Prerequisites: A 3000 level course appropriate to the subject to be studied, and consent of the Department Chairman. It may also be taken on a Pass/Fail basis if the student has requested so at the time of enrollment.

PH5810 Dissertation Research (0-8) As Required

Dissertation research for doctoral studies. Required in the quarter following advancement to candidacy and then continuously each quarter until dissertation is approved by the Academic Council.

Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering - Curriculum 533

Combat Systems Web Page:

http://www.nps.edu/Academics/Schools/GSEAS/Departments/Physics/CSSEC.html

Program Officer

Robert Kerchner, LCDR, USN

Spanagel Hall, Room 211

(831) 656-2950, DSN 756-2950

rwkerchn@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Richard Harkins, MS

Code Ph/Hr, Spanagel Hall, Room 142A

(831) 656-2828, DSN 756-2828

rharkins@nps.edu

Brief Overview

This program is designed to meet the needs of the military services for an officer having a broad-based advanced technical education applicable to combat systems design, development, test and evaluation, acquisition, operation, and support. The student does not necessarily earn a degree in Combat Systems. The majority of students earn a degree in Physics or Applied Physics. Degrees in Engineering Acoustics or Combat Systems Technology are also available on a space available basis. Included in the core of the program are courses on electromagnetic radiation, applied optics, optoelectronics, servo and computer control systems, explosives and warheads, fluid dynamics of weapons, combat simulation, underwater acoustics, semiconductor devices, detection and engagement elements, combat systems integration, and computing resources for advanced combat systems. The officer will also conduct thesis research on a military-relevant technical problem.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with mathematics through differential and integral calculus and a calculus-based basic physics sequence are required for direct input. Courses in the physical sciences and engineering are highly desirable. An APC of 323 is required.

Entry Date

Standard entry dates are January and July. Other entry dates are possible by special arrangement with the program officer. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer for this curriculum.

Degree

A student can earn one of the following degrees in the Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering (Curriculum 533): Master of Science in Physics, Applied Physics, Engineering Acoustics or Combat System Technology. Required classes vary by degree.

Subspecialty

The Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering Curriculum has options ranging from a four-quarter program for students ready to commence graduate-level courses, to an eight-quarter course of study for students who require a review of undergraduate coursework. Completion of the full eight-quarter curriculum qualifies an officer as a Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering Sub-specialist with a subspecialty code of 5701-5705P depending on specialization track. U.S. Navy students entering the Combat Systems Curriculum through the one-year Immediate Graduate Education Program receive a sub-specialty code of 5701-5704I. The curriculum sponsor is the Program Executive Officer, Integrated Weapons Systems (PEO-IWS).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

AEGIS Tech Rep, Morristown, NJ

DOE National Nuclear Security Agency, Washington, DC

Defense Threat Reduction Agency, Los Alamos, NM

Missile Defense Agency, Washington, DC (laser program)

Naval Sea Systems Command, Washington, DC (Battle Force Engineer, Systems Engineering East Coast Battle Group, NATO Sea Sparrow Surface Missile Program)

Naval Surface Warfare Center White Sands, NM (Project Support Officer, Weapons Test Officer)

Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren, VA (Strategic Fire Control)

Naval Surface Warfare Center Port Hueneme, CA (Aegis Ship Qualification Trials, Test and Evaluation Project Officer)

Program Executive Officer Carriers, Washington, DC (Deputy Program Manager Combat Systems)

Supervisor Shipbuilding, Jacksonville, FL (Ship Repair Officer)

Strategic Weapons Facility Atlantic, King's Bay, GA (Weapons Technology)

Strategic Systems Programs, Sunnyvale, CA (Arms Control Coordinator, Fire Control and Guidance Branch Head)

Program Executive Officer Strike, Washington, DC (Tech Director, Combat Systems, Air Dominance, Undersea Domain, Ship Design)

Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command, San Diego, CA (PD-18 Assistant Program Manager for Acoustic Sensor Systems)

United States Naval Academy (Physical Science Instructor)

Typical Course of Study - Applied Physics Option

Quarter 1

PH1994

(4-1)

Math for Scientists and Engineers I

PH1995

(4-1)

Math for Scientists and Engineers II

PH2151

(4-1)

Particle Mechanics

PH2001

(1-0)

Physics Thesis Opportunities

Quarter 2

PH2351

(4-2)

Electromagnetism

PH3996

(3-0)

Special Topics in Physics

PH3991

(4-0)

Theoretical Physics

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 3

PH2652

(4-1)

Modern Physics

PH3152

(4-0)

Mechanics of Physical Systems

PH3782

(4-0)

Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 4

SE3000

(2-0)

Systems Engineering Colloquium

PH3655

(4-0)

Solid State Physics

PH3360

(4-1)

Electromagnetic Waves

PC3014

(3-4)

Intermediate Applied Physics Laboratory

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 5

PC3172

(4-1)

Fluid Dynamics of Weapons Systems

Concentration Course

PC4015

(4-3)

Advanced Applied Physics Laboratory

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 6

PC4022

(4-0)

Combat Systems Capabilities

PC3400

(4-2)

Survey of Underwater Acoustics

PC4860

(4-0)

Advanced Weapon Concepts

Concentration Course

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 7

Concentration Course

PH4656

(4-0)

Quantum Mechanics

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

PH0999

(0-1)

Physics Colloquium

Quarter 8

PC3200

(4-1)

Physics of EM Sensors and Devices

PC3800

(4-0)

Survey of the Effects of Weapons

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

PH4001

(1-0)

Physics Thesis Presentation

Joint Professional Military Education (JPME):

All Unrestricted Line Naval Officers are required to take the following four courses for JPME; these courses are normally added to the matrix in the first 4 quarters:

NW3230 (4-2) Strategy and War

NW3275 (4-0) Joint Maritime Operations Part 1

NW3276 (2-2) Joint Maritime Operations Part 2

NW3285 (4-0) Threat Security Decision Making

Engineering Duty Officers will take only NW3230. Students from other services are not required to take JPME courses.

Concentration Areas:

NOTE: Final approval of an individual student's degree rests with the Chairman of the cognizant department.

MS Applied Physics:

Electromagnetic Sensor Systems (PH3292 is required, then select 3 of the other 5 to fulfill the requirement):

PH3280

(4-1)

Introduction to MEMS

PH3292

(4-2)

Applied Optics

PH4271

(4-1)

Lasers, Optoelectronics, and Electro-Optics I

PH4272

(4-1)

Lasers, Optoelectronics, and Electro-Optics II

PH4273

(4-2)

Physics of Advanced Imaging Systems

Weapons and Effects (Select 4 out of these 5 courses to fulfill the requirement):

PH4055

(4-0)

Free Electron Lasers

PH4171

(4-1)

Physics of Explosives

PH4857

(4-1)

Physics of Directed Energy and Conventional Weapons

PH4858

(4-0)

Weapons Lethality and Survivability

PH4911

(3-2)

Simulation of Physical and Weapon Systems

Acoustics Track (PH3119 is required, then select 4 of the other 5 to fulfill the requirement):

PH3119

(4-2)

Oscillations and Waves

PH3451

(4-2)

Fundamental Acoustics

PH3452

(4-2)

Underwater Acoustics

PH4454

(4-2)

Sonar Transducer Theory and Design

PH4455

(4-0)

Sound Propagation in the Ocean

PH4459

(4-0)

Nonlinear Oscillations and Waves

Total Ship Systems Engineering:

TS3000

(3-2)

Electrical Power Engineering

TS3001

(3-2)

Fundamental Principles of Naval Architecture

TS3002

(3-2)

Principles of Ship Design and Case Studies

TS3003

(3-2)

Naval Combat System Elements

TS4000

(3-2)

Naval Combat System Engineering

TS4001

(3-2)

Integration of Naval Engineering Systems

TS4002

(2-4)

Ship Design Integration

TS4003

(2-4)

Total Ship System Engineering

MS Physics Track (Select all of these to fulfill the requirement):

PH3152

(4-0)

Analytical Mechanics

PH3360

(4-0)

Electromagnetic Waves

PH3782

(4-0)

Thermodynamics and Statistical Physics

PH3991

(4-1)

Theoretical Physics

PH4353

(4-0)

Topics in Advanced Electricity and Magnetism

PH4656

(4-0)

Quantum Mechanics

A two course Physics sequence.

MS Engineering Acoustics Track:

PH3119

(4-2)

Oscillations and Waves

PH3451

(4-2)

Fundamental Acoustics

PH3452

(4-2)

Underwater Acoustics

PH4454

(4-2)

Sonar Transducer Theory and Design

PH4455

(4-0)

Sound Propagation in the Ocean

EO3402

(3-1)

Signals and Noise

EC4450

(4-1)

Sonar Systems Engineering

Typical Course of Study - 4-Quarter Applied Physics Degree

Quarter 1

PH3119

(4-2)

Waves and Oscillations

PC3172

(4-1)

Physics of Weapon Systems: Fluid Dynamics of Weapons, Shock Waves, Explosions

4000 level elective

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Quarter 2

PH3991

(4-0)

Theoretical Physics

PH3451

(4-2)

Fundamental Acoustics

PH3655

(4-0)

Solid State Physics

PH3352

(4-0)

Electromagnetic Waves

Quarter 3

PH3452

(4-2)

Underwater Acoustics

PH4454

(4-2)

Sonar Transducer Theory and Design

PH4656

(4-1)

Quantum Mechanics

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Quarter 4

PH4455

(4-0)

Sound Propagation in the Ocean

4000 level elective

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis

PH0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Combat Systems Sciences and Engineering - Curriculum 533
Subspecialty Code 57xxP

  1. MATHEMATICS, SCIENCE, AND ENGINEERING FUNDAMENTALS: A solid foundation in mathematics, physics, and engineering underpinning combat-systems technology to support the theoretical and experimental aspects of the technical courses in the curriculum.
  2. ACOUSTIC AND ELECTROMAGNETIC SYSTEMS: A graduate level understanding of acoustic and electromagnetic propagation; physics of solid state, and electro-optic devices; including the principles of radar and sonar systems; and signal analysis, processing, and decision theory.
  3. COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS: A graduate level understanding of various communication systems including fiber optics and automatic control systems.
  4. WEAPONS SYSTEMS AND APPLIED FLUID MECHANICS: A graduate-level understanding of the fluid dynamics of subsonic and supersonic weapons, warheads and their effects.
  5. COMBAT SYSTEMS ANALYSIS, SIMULATION, AND TESTING: Sufficient foundation in Systems Analysis and Simulation to understand the limits of each, and their effect on required combat systems testing.
  6. COMBAT SYSTEMS ENGINEERING: An understanding of the principles of design, development, testing and evaluation; and the importance of performance and economic trade-offs in combat systems. The fundamentals, and requirements for Verification, Validation, and Assessment (VV&A) Processes including open architecture designs and their implications on integration of computing resources in advanced combat systems.
  7. MATERIALS SCIENCE: A familiarity with the concepts of materials science sufficient for an understanding of the mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of materials important in present and future combat systems.
  8. STRATEGY AND POLICY: Officers develop a graduate-level ability to think strategically, critically analyze past military campaigns, and apply historical lessons for future joint and combined operations, in order to discern the relationship between a nation’s policies and goals and the ways military power may be used to achieve them. Fulfilled by completing the first of the Naval War College course series (Strategy and Policy) leading to Service Intermediate level Professional Military Education (PME) and Phase I Joint PME credit.
  9. THESIS: The graduate will demonstrate the ability to conduct independent research in combat systems sciences and engineering, and proficiency in presenting the results in writing and orally by means of a thesis and command-oriented briefing.
  10. TECHNICAL SPECIALIZATION: Each officer will also acquire technical competence in one or more of the following concentrations as it pertains to Combat Systems: Electromagnetic Systems, Weapons & Effects, Physics, Underwater Acoustic Systems, or a specific engineering discipline.

The knowledge required for each of the approved Technical Specialization concentrations is as follows:

  1. ELECTROMAGNETIC SYSTEMS (5701)
    1. Propagation and scattering of optical, IR, and microwave radiation in the turbulent atmosphere as they influence target detection.
    2. Advanced sensor and detection techniques for military applications.
    3. Advanced concepts of target surveillance, acquisition, and engagement.
  2. WEAPONS & EFFECTS (5702)
    1. Molecular energetics and detonation physics.
    2. Impact phenomena. Fragmentation and rod-like projectile penetration.
    3. Warhead design and lethality considerations; target vulnerability and survivability consideration; kill probability.
    4. Principles of directed energy weapons systems and their effects.
    5. Electric ship weapon systems.
  3. PHYSICS (5703)
    1. Statistical physics.
    2. Advanced E&M radiation.
    3. Advanced Quantum Mechanics.
  4. UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC SYSTEMS (5704)
    1. Wave propagation in the ocean; scattering, fluctuations and boundary interactions as they effect detection, localization, and prosecution of underwater targets; underwater transducer design and array theory.
    2. Active and passive acoustic signal processing for detection of submarines, mines, and other underwater weapons; adaptive techniques.
    3. Acoustic influences of oceanographic phenomena, which effect target detection including boundary characteristics, ambient noise, sound speed profiles, fronts, and eddies.
  5. TOTAL SHIP SYSTEMS ENGINEERING (5705)
    1. Power systems.
    2. Naval architecture and ship design.
    3. Shipboard combat systems.
    4. Integration issues.

Space Systems Academic Group

Chair

Rudy Panholzer, Ph.D.

Code SP, Bullard Hall, Room 205

(831) 656-2154, DSN 756-2154, FAX (831) 656-2816

rpanholzer@nps.edu

Brij Agrawal*, Distinguished Professor, Ph.D., Syracuse, 1970.

Kyle Alfriend*, Visiting Professor, Ph.D., Virginia Tech, 1967.

Thomas Betterton, RADM, USN (Ret.), Professor, Chair Naval Space Technology, EAA-Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1966.

Dan Boger*, Professor, Chairman of IS department, Ph.D., University of California Berkeley, 1979.

Alex Bordetsky*, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Chelyabinsk St Tec University, 1982.

Christopher Brophy*, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Alabama(Huntsville), 1997.

Daniel Bursch, CAPT, USN (Ret.), Astronaut, NRO Chair; M.S, Naval Postgraduate School, 1991.

Bill Colson*, Distinguished Professor, Ph.D., Stanford University, 1977 .

Phil Durkee*, Dean of GSEAS, Ph.D., Colorado State University, 1984.

Stephen Frick, CAPT, USN (Ret.), Astronaut, NASA Chair, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

Douglas Fouts*, Professor, Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara, 1990.

James A. Horning, Research Associate, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1997.

Mathias Kolsch, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of California Santa Barbara, 2004.

Herschel H. Loomis, Jr.*, Professor, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1963.

Scott Matey, LTC, USA, Military Instructor, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2001.

Christine McManus, CDR, USN, Program Officer, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 2011

Sherif Michael*, Associate Professor, Ph.D., West Virginia University, 1983.

Clay Moltz, Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of California Berkley, 1989.

James H. Newman, Professor, Astronaut Ph.D., Rice University, 1984.

Richard C. Olsen*, Professor, Ph.D., University of California, San Diego, 1980.

Rudy Panholzer, Professor, Ph.D., Technical University Graz, Austria, 1961, EE., Stanford University, 1957.

Charles M. Racoosin, CDR, USN (Ret.), Naval Space Systems, Lecturer; M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1989.

Jennifer Rhatigan, Visiting Professor, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University, 2001.

Mark Rhoades, CDR, USN (Ret.), Senior Lecturer, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1990.

Marcello Romano, Associate Professor, Ph.D., Politecnico di Milano, Italy, 2001.

Alan Ross, Professor of Practice, Ph.D., University of California, Davis, 1978.

Michael Ross*, Professor, Ph.D., Penn State University, 1991.

Dan Sakoda, Research Associate, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1992.

Alan Scott, CAPT, USN (Ret), Senior Lecturer; Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineer, Naval Postgraduate School, 1994.

David Trask, MASINT Chair Professor, M.B.A., Embry-Riddle University, 1991.

Stephen Tackett, LCDR USNR (Ret.), Lecturer, M.S., Naval Postgraduate School, 1995.

Todd Weatherford*, Associate Professor, Ph.D., North Carolina State University, 1993.

Joseph Welch*, CDR, USN (Ret.), Lecturer, M.S., Nova Southeastern University, 2001, M.S. Naval Postgraduate School, 1987.

(* indicates faculty member has a joint appointment to another department at NPS)

Brief Overview

The Space Systems Academic Group (SSAG) is an interdisciplinary association of faculty and academic chair professors representing eight separate academic disciplines. The SSAG has established four Chair professorships sponsored by the Aerospace Corporation/NRO, NASA, Navy PEO Space Systems, and the MASINT Chair Professor who supports the SSAG in areas of Measurement and Signature Intelligence (MASINT). The Space Systems Academic Group has responsibility for the academic content of the Space Systems Operations and Space Systems Engineering curricula. Instruction is carried out by faculty members attached to the group, as well as the following academic departments: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, Mathematics, Operations Research, Physics, Information Operations, and Systems Management. The Space Systems Academic Group approves thesis topics for students in Space Systems Operations. For Space Systems Engineering, the group chairman approves the final thesis in addition to the academic department granting the degree.

Degrees

Space Systems Operations

The Space Systems Operations students are awarded the Master of Science in Space Systems Operations degree. Degree requirements:

  1. A minimum of 45 quarter-hours of graduate level work is required, of which at least 15 hours must be at the 4000 level.
  2. Graduate courses in at least four different academic disciplines must be included and in two disciplines, a course at the 4000 level must be included. There is also a requirement of three courses constituting advanced study in an area of specialization.
  3. Each student is required to write a thesis that is space oriented; a maximum of 13 hours earned for the thesis may be included in satisfaction of the 45 quarter-hour requirement.
  4. The Chairman of the Space Systems Academic Group must approve all study programs.

Space Systems Engineering

The Space Systems Engineering students earn a master's degree in one of the following academic areas: Astronautical Engineering, Computer Science, Electrical and Computer Engineering, or Physics. Refer to the degree requirements in the associated departments.

Group Facilities

Space Systems Course Descriptions

SS Courses

Place-holder. Do not remove.

<SS Courses SS0810-SS4900>

SS0810 Thesis Research (0-8) As Required

Every student conducting thesis research enrolls in this course.

SS3001 Military Applications of National Space Systems (3-2) Winter/Summer

Space Systems and technologies of interest to the military. Strategic and tactical imagery and SIGINT requirements. Tasking and use of national space systems and ground support elements. Vulnerability considerations and impact of current R&D programs. Prerequisites: SS3500, PH3052, EO3525 or EO3516. Classification: TOP SECRET clearance with access to SCI.

SS3011 Space Technology and Applications (3-0) As Required

SS3011 is an introduction to space mission analysis with an emphasis on those space missions supporting military operations. Topics include space history, doctrine and organizations, orbital mechanics, communication link analysis, the space environment, spacecraft technology and design, and military, civil and commercial space systems. Prerequisites: None.

SS3035 Microprocessors for Space Applications (3-2) Spring

An introduction to microprocessors at the hardware/software interface. Machine language programming, assembly language programming, I/O systems and interfacing, and operating systems. Prerequisites: EC2820.

SS3041 Space Systems and Operations I (4-2)Spring

SS3041 introduces space systems mission analysis and design. This course addresses the architecture design of complex space systems. Topics include: mission / capabilities / requirements analysis, architecture development and synthesis, and performance, cost and operational effectiveness evaluation. SS3041 is part of an architecture design sequence culminating in a group architecture design project in SS4051s. Prerequisites: SS3011, SS3500, and PH3052 (concurrently). Classification: SECRET for resident and UNCLAS for DL.

SS3051 Military Applications of DoD and Commercial Space Systems (4-0) Winter/Summer

This course covers joint space doctrine and military applications of DoD and commercial space systems. Topics include the space mission areas of space situational awareness, space force enhancement, space control and space support. The space force enhancement section of the course includes intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, missile tracking, launch detection, environmental monitoring, satellite communication, positioning, navigation and timing, and navigation warfare. Additional topics include space law, policy and strategy, incorporating space based capabilities in military operations, threats to U.S. space systems, foreign space capabilities, and space support to friendly force tracking, combat search and rescue and maritime domain awareness. PREREQUISITES: SS3400 or SS3500. Classification: SECRET clearance.

SS3400 Orbital Mechanics, Launch and Space Operations (4-2) Winter

This course provides an understanding of Orbital Mechanics and the associated implications to the use of space-based systems in support of military operations. Fundamental concepts such as conic sections, coordinate systems, coordinate transformations and time are covered, then applied to the understanding and application of Newton’s laws, Kepler’s laws, orbital elements, perturbations, and orbital maneuvering. Prerequisites: None.

SS3500 Orbital Mechanics and Launch Systems (4-2) Winter

Provides a fundamental understanding of Orbital Mechanics through study of conic sections, coordinate systems, coordinate transformations, and time. Calculation of orbital elements of the two-body problem is covered. Other Orbital Mechanics topics include: Newton's laws, Kepler's equation, orbital perturbations, and orbital maneuvering, including rendezvous and proximity operations. Launch systems topics include: the rocket equation, single and multi-stage rockets, launch windows, launch profiles, ascent and payload delivery performance, and mission design. Supporting lab work utilizes the Satellite Tool Kit (STK) as an orbit analysis tool. The use of Excel and / or MATLAB for solving problems is encouraged. Prerequisites: None.

SS3600 Space Systems Modeling and Simulation (2-3) Spring

SS3600 provides students with knowledge of modeling and simulation theory and the ability to apply space systems modeling and simulation tools to real world problems. Concepts covered include the development and applicability of models and simulations, with a focus on specific space applications. Students will apply these concepts through laboratory exercises and a project to simulate an end-to-end space architecture, evaluate system performance, and compare alternative solutions. Prerequisites: SS3500.

SS3613 Military Satellite Communications (3-0) Summer/Fall

SS3613 addresses military satellite communications mission analysis, systems design, and applications. This course covers requirements, tactical employment, system architectures, satellite design and performance, terminal design and performance, associated information systems, link budget calculations, telemetry and control and IO/IW implications. Prerequisites: SS3011, or consent of instructor. U.S. Citizen, Classification: FOUO.

SS3900 Special Topics in Space Systems (Variable Hours 1-0 to 5-0) (V-0) As Required

Directed study either experimental or theoretical in nature. Prerequisites: Consent of Chairman of Space Systems Academic Group and instructor. May be taken on Pass/Fail basis if the student has requested so at the time of enrollment. Prerequisites: None.

SS4000 Space Systems Seminars (0-1) Fall/Winter/Spring/Summer

Seminars consist of lectures to provide perspective on Space Systems And to expose the student to various space activities such as industry, NASA and DoD laboratories and commands. Prerequisites: None.

SS4051 Military Space Systems and Architectures (3-2) Fall

This course covers the system level architectural design of selected Space Systems. Emphasis is on a balanced design of all seven components of space systems: space segment, launch segment, ground segment, mission operations, C3 architecture, subject, and orbit and constellation. Prerequisites: SS3001 , SS3041, SS3500. Classification: TOP SECRET clearance with access to SCI for resident and SECRET for DL.

SS4801 Space Autonomy Laboratory (2-4) As Required

This course provides students a hands-on experience in current and advance space autonomy concepts. Students will be exposed to the command, control and operations of a satellite while understanding the engineering ramifications of various space sensors and actuators and the resulting telmetry. Each lab will involve students designing and implementing a space mission in the reconfigurable space autonomy testbed. Students will gain hands-on experience in understanding the role of autonomy for tactical and strategic needs. Each laboratory experiment exposes a student to the range of capabilities as well as the limits of autonomy. Prerequisite: SS3500.

SS4900 Advanced Study in Space Systems (Variable Hours 1-0 to 5-0) (V-0) As Required

Directed graduate study based on journal literature, experimental projects, or other sources. Prerequisites: Consent of Chairman of Space Systems Academic Group and instructor. May be taken on Pass/Fail basis if the student has requested so at the time of enrollment. Prerequisites: None.

Space Systems Certificate (SSC) - Curriculum 273

Program Officer

Christine McManus, CDR

Code 78, Bullard Hall, Room 203

(831) 656-7517, DSN 756-7517

cdmcmanu1@@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steve Tackett, Lecturer

Code SP/Ta, Bullard Hall, Room 204

(831) 656-2944, DSN 756-2944

shtacket@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Space Systems Certificate program is comprised of four courses (SS3011, PH3052, SS3613, and PH2514 or SS3051 - secret clearance option). Upon successful completion of the course work, students will be awarded a certificate of accomplishment in keeping with standard practices of the Naval Postgraduate School as well as the 6206L subspecialty code. The Space Systems Certificate program supports Navy and DoD space educational needs and complements existing resident training by providing cross-disciplinary science and technical education. The Space Systems Certificate program is targeted primarily at enhancing the education and preparation for USN Space Cadre personnel. The Navy's Space Cadre represents a distinct body of expertise horizontally integrated within the Navy active duty, reserves, both officer and enlisted, and civilian employee communities organized to operationalize space.

The requirement to establish a distance learning program for National Security Space (NSS) personnel in space systems and space applications was driven primarily by the DoD-wide space educational requirement identified by the Undersecretary of the Air Force, as the Executive Agent for Space, and documented in the “Commission to Assess United States National Security Space Management and Organization” (2001).

Entry to the Space Cadre is met, in part, by completion of a Space PQS. The courses included in the certificate are designed to give a prospective Space Cadre member the knowledge required to meet the requirements of many of the portions of the PQS.

Completion of the Certificate will count toward satisfaction of the Information Professional Advanced Qualification Certification matrix (COMNAVCYBERFORINST 1520.1).

Based on this, the NPS Space Systems Certificate (SSC) was developed, comprised of the following four courses:

The original course and academic content for the SSC was vetted and approved by USN space and space training leaders. The Space Systems Certificate is a completely Web-based, asynchronous education program that covers fundamental areas of twenty-first century space enhancement to military operations as validated by NETWARCOM (November 2004). The learning outcomes for the SSC Certificate program directly support the Educational Skill Requirements within the Space Systems Operation (subspecialty code 6206P) degree. Evaluation of the Space Systems Certificate occurs in conjunction with the biannual Space Systems curriculum review.

Requirements for Entry

A baccalaureate degree with above-average grades. Completion of college level Algebra 2 and college level Physics with a grade of 'C' or better is required.

Entry Dates

At the beginning of the following quarters for each academic year (Oct, Apr).

Program Length

Four Quarters

Graduate Certificate Requirements

Requirements for the certificate in Space Systems are met by successful completion of all four courses. Certificate credit is obtained by maintenance of a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

Required Courses: Curriculum 273

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

SS3613

or

EC4590

(3-0)

Military Satellite Communications (MILSATCOM)

EC4590 is an approved substitute for students who are unable to get clearance for SS3613.

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

PH2514

or

SS3501

(4-0)

 

(4-0)

Introduction to the Space Environment (4-0)

Military Applications of DOD and Commercial Space Systems

Space Systems Operations (DL) - Curriculum 316

Program Officer

Christine McManus, CDR

Code 78, Bullard Hall, Room 203

(831) 656-7517, DSN 756-7517

cdmcmanu1@@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steve Tackett, Lecturer

Code SP/Ta, Bullard Hall, Room 204

(831) 656-2944, DSN 756-2944

shtacket@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Space Systems Operations (Distance Learning) curriculum is designed to provide officers and U.S. government civilians with knowledge of military opportunities and applications in space. Students are provided instruction about the operation, tasking and employment of space surveillance, communications, navigation and atmospheric /oceanographic /environmental sensing systems as well as payload design and integration-specifically for the exploitation of Space and Information products. DoD organizations or sponsors provide the students, and the Space Systems Academic Group coordinates the instruction, course materials, and experience, which are provided by faculty from various NPS departments. Courses are delivered at the students' local site using a combination of, web-conferencing tools, and web-enhanced on-line courses.

Requirements for Entry

This curriculum is open to officers of the U.S. Armed Forces and selected civilian employees of the U.S. Federal Government. Admission requires a baccalaureate degree with above-average grades, completion of mathematics through integral calculus, plus at least one course in calculus-based physics. An APC of 324 or GPA of 2.6 is required for entry. A security clearance is not required but highly recommended. In the event a student does not have access to SIPR, SS3051 may be substituted with IO3100.

Entry Date

The Space Systems Operations (Distance Learning) curriculum is an eight-quarter course of study with a single entry date in the Fall quarter. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer.

Program Length

Eight Quarters

Degree

The course of study yields the Master of Science in Space Systems Operations degree.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a Space Systems Operations Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6206G. The curriculum sponsor is OPNAV N2/N6, The subject Matter Expert is Naval Network Warfare Command (NETWARCOM).

Typical Course of Study - Space Systems Operations-Fall Entry

Quarter 1

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

PH2514

(4-0)

Introduction to the Space Environment

Quarter 2

SS3500

(4-2)

Orbital Mechanics and Launch Systems

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

Quarter 3

EO3516

(4-2)

Intro to Communication System Engineering

AE4830

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems I

Quarter 4

EO4516

(4-2)

Communication Systems Analysis

AE4831

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems II

Quarter 5

SS3041

(4-2)

Space Systems & Operations I

SS3613

(3-0)

Military Satellite Communications

Quarter 6

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis

SS3051

(4-0)

Military Applications of DoD and Commercial Space Systems

or IO3100

(4-0)

Information Operations

Quarter 7

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis

SS4051

(3-2)

Military Space Systems and Architectures

Quarter 8

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Space Systems Operations (DL) - Curriculum 316
Subspecialty Code: 6206G

Graduates of the Space Systems Operations Specialization of the Information Sciences, Systems, and Operations (ISSO) Curriculum shall be able to determine space systems requirements which support the following operational concepts: control of space, global engagement, full force integration, and global partnerships. The graduates shall be able to analyze courses of action for the best employment of available space assets for ongoing and future military operations, and communicate this assessment to shore and afloat staffs and commanders.

Supporting these goals are the following specific requirements:

  1. Orbital Mechanics and Space Environment:
    1. Graduates will examine the basic physics of orbital motion, and calculate and distinguish the parameters used in the description of orbits and their ground tracks.
    2. Graduates will examine the design of orbits and constellations, and analyze how they are achieved, maintained, and controlled; to include spacecraft maneuver and orbit transfer calculations.
    3. Graduates will examine the fundamentals of spacecraft tracking and command/control from a ground station.
    4. Graduates will analyze the relationship between various orbital characteristics and the satisfaction of mission requirements, including the advantages and disadvantages of various orbits.
    5. Graduates examine the space environment impacts on spacecraft parts, materials, and operations to spacecraft and mission design.
  2. Spacecraft Design:
    1. Graduates will examine the basic system design of a spacecraft including its various subsystems: propulsion; structure; thermal; attitude determination and control; electrical power; and telemetry, tracking and commanding.
    2. Graduates will assess key interactions between the various subsystems and their effects on system performance.
  3. National Security Systems:
    1. Graduates will examine the nature of space warfare (theory, history, doctrine, and policy); distinguish between the four JP 3-14 defined Space Mission Areas (Space Control, Space Support, Force Enhancement, Force Application); and interpret how current and planned space capabilities contribute to the satisfaction of these mission areas.
    2. Graduates will examine the roles, responsibilities, and relationships of National and DoD organizations in establishing policies, priorities, and requirements for National Security Space systems; and in the design, acquisition, operation, and exploitation of these systems.
    3. Graduates will examine the role of the Services / Agencies in establishing required space system capabilities, and will translate these capabilities into system performance requirements.
    4. Graduates will examine: current and planned Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities; how space systems contribute to these capabilities; the intelligence collection and analysis process; and how war-fighters access information from these sources.
  4. Project Management and System Acquisition:
    1. Graduates will examine project management and DoD system acquisition methods and procedures to include contract management, financial management and control, and the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution system (PPBE).
    2. Graduates will examine system acquisition organizational responsibilities and relationships (e.g., Congress, DoD, Services, Resource Sponsor, Systems Commands, Operating Forces) as they pertain to the acquisition of systems for DoD, Naval, and civilian agency users.
    3. Graduates will examine the unique nature of space acquisition programs using the Space Systems Acquisition Policy process. Based on this knowledge, they will plan and structure a notional space system acquisition program.
    4. Graduates will examine how proposed space-related capabilities and DOTMLPF requirements are translated from concept to real-world implementation.
    5. Graduates will apply the tools of project management (e.g., scheduling, costing, budgeting, planning, resource negotiation, risk management) to a space project.
    6. Graduates will prepare for and conduct program reviews, from systems requirements through critical design, during spacecraft and architecture design projects.
  5. Communications:
    1. Graduates will examine the basic principles of communications systems engineering to include both the space and ground segments.
    2. Graduates will examine digital and analog communications architecture design, including such topics as frequency reuse, multiple access, link design, repeater architecture, source encoding, waveforms/modulations, and propagation media.
    3. Graduates will calculate and analyze link budgets to assess communication system suitability to support mission requirements, and to translate mission requirements into communications system design characteristics.
    4. Graduates will differentiate, compare, and contrast the characteristics and capabilities of current and future communications systems in use or planned by Naval operating and Joint forces afloat and ashore.
    5. Graduates will recognize the national and international issues involving use of the frequency spectrum.
    6. Graduates will discuss the nature of the rapid evolution in commercial satellite communications systems, and recognize the impact of such advancements on military operations and systems development.
  6. Remote Sensing:
    1. Graduates will examine principles of active and passive sensors in current or planned use.
    2. Graduates will examine the effects of the space, atmospheric, and terrestrial environments (including countermeasures) on sensor performance.
    3. Graduates will examine tradeoffs among various sensors and platforms, evaluating how each satisfies mission requirements such as access area, resolution, timeliness, and capacity.
  7. Analysis, Synthesis, and Evaluation:
    1. Graduates will derive, assess, and articulate capabilities necessary for the use of National Security Space systems in support of military operations.
    2. Graduates will examine various engineering and mathematical definitions of cost functions (revisit time, dwell time, local coverage, etc.)
    3. Graduates will use business case (economic) and performance data to analyze trade-offs between commercial and DoD systems to provide desired operational capabilities.
  8. Architecting Joint Military Space Missions:
    1. Graduates will examine and relate the principles of architecting a complex, Joint National Security Space mission, and the life cycle process by which a space system is conceived, structured, designed, built, tested, certified and operated in a way that ensures its integrity and performance.
    2. Graduates will develop and assess system requirements; compose alternate architectures to satisfy those requirements; and evaluate and select the most effective alternative.
    3. Graduates will develop system design criteria from stated performance requirements, and conduct trade-offs between payloads and other spacecraft subsystems.
    4. Graduates will examine the design of current and planned space-based mission payloads (e.g., ISR, Communications, PNT, SIGINT).
    5. Graduates will examine the basic principles and operational issues of space access to include launch vehicle performance, launch windows, and their impact on military operations.
    6. Graduates will examine the basic elements of mission operations – spacecraft commanding, payload management, anomaly resolution, orbital maneuver planning – and will apply these concepts during satellite and architecture design projects.
    7. Graduates will understand the role of space in the development of an OPLAN. Graduates will have the ability to assess a concept of operations that includes all four mission areas identified in JP 3-14. Graduates will demonstrate the ability to develop an acceptable command and control structure for space operations and the space annex of an OPLAN.
  9. Advanced Concepts and Technologies in Space Systems:
    1. Graduates will examine how current and future space systems contribute to National Security and will examine means to employ space-based capabilities to support information dominance.
    2. Graduates will examine potential future military space requirements stemming from desired information superiority capabilities.
    3. Graduates will examine future concepts of operation published by various DoD and international organizations (ESA, ISA, WSO, etc.) based on emerging technologies and appraise their impact on military space.
    4. Graduates will examine the advanced concepts and technologies which could be used in future military space systems.
  10. Conduct and Report Research:
    1. Graduates will conduct independent or group research on a space systems problem, including resolution of the problem and presentation of the results and analysis in both written and oral form.

ESR Approval Authority

Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Information Dominance (OPNAV N2/N6) April 2012

Space Systems Operations (International) - Curriculum 364

Program Officer

Christine McManus, CDR

Code 78, Bullard Hall, Room 203

(831) 656-7517, DSN 756-7517

cdmcmanu1@@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steve Tackett, Instructor

Code SP/Ta, Bullard Hall, Room 204

(831) 656-2944, DSN 756-2944

shtacket@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Space Systems Operations (International) curriculum is designed to provide international officers with knowledge of military opportunities and applications in space. It is also available to US citizens who may not have a security clearance. Students are provided instruction about the operation, tasking, and employment of space surveillance, communications, navigation, and atmospheric/oceanographic/environmental sensing systems as well as payload design and integration — specifically for the exploitation of Space and Information products. For a complete description, see the Space Systems Operations (366) section of the catalog.

Requirements for Entry

This curriculum is open to International Officers. Admission requires a baccalaureate degree with above-average grades, completion of mathematics through differential equations and integral calculus, plus at least one course in calculus-based physics. An APC of 324 is required for direct entry. Students lacking this background may matriculate through the one-quarter Engineering Science program (Curriculum 460).

Entry Date

The Space Systems Operations curriculum is a six-quarter course of study with a single entry date in the Fall Quarter. A summer academic refresher quarter is available as needed. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer.

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Space Systems Operations (International) students are awarded the Master of Science in Space Systems Operations degree as specified previously in the Space Systems Academic Group section of the Catalog.

Typical Course of Study - Space Systems Operations (International)

Quarter 1

IT1500

(4-0)

Informational Program Seminar for International Officers

PH2514

(4-0)

Space Environment

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 2

EO3516

(4-2)

Intro to Communication Systems Engineering

SS3400

(4-2)

Orbital Mechanics, Launch and Space Systems

AE4830

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems I

NS4677

(4-0)

Space and International Security

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 3

EO4516

(4-2)

Communication Systems Analysis

IT1600

(3-0)

Communication Skills for International Officers

AE4831

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems II

SS3600

(3-2)

Space Systems Modeling and Simulation

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 4

IS3502

(4-2)

Network Operations I

IT1700

(3-0)

Academic Writing for International Officers

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 5

SE3100

(3-2)

Fundamentals of Systems Engineering

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis

GB3031

(3-0)

Principles of Acquisition Management

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 6

EC4590

(3-0)

Communications Satellite Systems Engineering

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Space Systems Operations - Curriculum 366

Program Officer

Christine McManus, CDR

Code 78, Bullard Hall, Room 203

(831) 656-7517, DSN 756-7517

cdmcmanu1@@nps.edu

Academic Associate

Steve Tackett, Instructor

Code SP/Ta, Bullard Hall, Room 204

(831) 656-2944, DSN 756-2944

shtacket@nps.edu

Brief Overview

The Space Systems Operations curriculum is designed to provide officers with knowledge of military opportunities and applications in space. Students are provided instruction about the operation, tasking and employment of space surveillance, communications, navigation and atmospheric, oceanographic, and environmental sensing systems as well as payload design and integration—specifically for the exploitation of Space and Information products.

The Space Systems Operations curriculum is one of the Information Superiority (IS) curricula, which encompasses several degree tracks: Computer Sciences, Joint C4I Systems, Information Systems and Technology, Information Warfare, Intelligence Information Management, Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation, and Space Systems Operations. The Professional Practice Core of the Information Superiority (IS) curricula consists of material in Information Sciences and Technology, Command and Control, C4ISR Systems, Acquisition, C4ISR System Evaluation, Information Operations/Warfare, and Enterprise Policy, Strategy and Change. This specialization satisfies the Information Superiority education skill requirements as established by CNO-N6.

Requirements for Entry

This curriculum is open to officers of the U.S. Armed Forces and selected civilian employees of the U.S. Federal Government. Admission requires a baccalaureate degree with above-average grades, completion of mathematics through differential equations and integral calculus, plus at least one course in calculus-based physics. An APC of 324 is required for direct entry. Students lacking this background may matriculate through the one-quarter Engineering Science program (Curriculum 460). A TOP SECRET security clearance is required with SPECIAL INTELLIGENCE (SI) clearance obtainable for all students.

Entry Date

The Space Systems Operations curriculum is a six-quarter course of study with a single entry date in the Fall Quarter. A summer academic refresher quarter is available as needed. If further information is needed, contact the Academic Associate or Program Officer. An eight quarter course of study is available for USMC/Army officers and others as necessary.

Program Length

Six Quarters

Degree

Requirements for the Master of Science in Space Systems Operations degree are met as a milestone en route to satisfying the Educational Skill Requirements of the curricular program.

Subspecialty

Completion of this curriculum qualifies an officer as a Space Systems Operations Subspecialist with a subspecialty code of 6206P. The curriculum sponsor is OPNAV N2/N6. The designated Subject Matter Expert is the Naval Networks Warfare Command (NETWARCOM).

Typical Subspecialty Jobs

Project Officer: OPNAV (N2/N6) TENCAP, Arlington, VA

Project Officer: SPAWAR Space Field Activity (SSFA)/NRO, Chantilly, VA

Space Advisor: NAVNETWARCOM, Norfolk, VA

Detachment OIC: Naval Space Operations Command (NAVSOC), Colorado Springs, CO

Staff Officer, Space and Global Strike: USSTRATCOM, Omaha, NE

Typical Course of Study - Space Systems Operations-Fall Entry

Quarter 1

PH2514

(4-0)

Space Environment

PH3052

(4-0)

Physics of Space and Airborne Sensor Systems

SS3011

(3-0)

Space Technology and Applications

NW3230

(4-2)

Strategy and Policy (All DoN) (JPME)

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 2

NW3285

(4-0)

National Security Decision Making (JPME)

EO3516

(4-2)

Intro to Communication Systems Engineering

AE4830

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems I

SS3400

(4-2)

Orbital Mechanics, Launch and Space Systems

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 3

SS3041

(4-2)

Space Systems &Operations I (SECRET)

EO4516

(4-2)

Communications Systems Analysis

AE4831

(3-2)

Spacecraft Systems II

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 4

SS3051

(4-0)

Military Applications of DoD and Commercial Space Systems (Secret)

SS3001

(3-2)

Military Applications of National Space Systems (TS/SCI)

SS3613

(3-0)

MILSATCOM System & Applications (FOUO)

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 5

SS4051

(3-2)

Military Space Systems and Architectures (TS/SCI)

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

NW3275

(4-0)

Joint Maritime Operations Part I (JPME)

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Quarter 6

Elective

(3-0)

Elective

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

SS0810

(0-8)

Thesis Research

NW3276

(2-2)

Joint Maritime Operations Part II

SS4000

(0-1)

Seminar

Educational Skill Requirements (ESR)
Information Sciences, Systems, and Operations - Curriculum 366
Subspecialty Code: 6206P

Graduates of the Space Systems Operations Specialization of the Information Sciences, Systems, and Operations (ISSO) Curriculum shall be able to determine space systems requirements which support the following operational concepts: control of space, global engagement, full force integration, and global partnerships. The graduates shall be able to analyze courses of action for the best employment of available space assets for ongoing and future military operations, and communicate this assessment to shore and afloat staffs and commanders.

Supporting these goals are the following specific requirements:

  1. Orbital Mechanics, Space Environment, and Remote Sensing:
    1. Graduates will examine the basic physics of orbital motion, and calculate and distinguish the parameters used in the description of orbits and their ground tracks.
    2. Graduates will examine the design of orbits and constellations, and analyze how they are achieved, maintained, and controlled; to include spacecraft maneuver and orbit transfer calculations.
    3. Graduates will examine the fundamentals of spacecraft tracking and command/control from a ground station.
    4. Graduates will analyze the relationship between various orbital characteristics and the satisfaction of mission requirements, including the advantages and disadvantages of various orbits.
    5. Graduates will apply this understanding of how the space environment impacts spacecraft parts, materials, and operations to spacecraft and mission design.
  2. Spacecraft Design:
    1. Graduates will examine the basic system design of a spacecraft including its various subsystems: propulsion; structure; thermal; attitude determination and control; electrical power; and telemetry, tracking and commanding.
    2. Graduates will assess key interactions between the various subsystems and their effects on system performance.
  3. National Security Systems:
    1. Graduates will examine the nature of space warfare (theory, history, doctrine, and policy); distinguish between the four JP 3-14 defined Space Mission Areas (Space Control, Space Support, Force Enhancement, Force Application); and interpret how current and planned space capabilities contribute to the satisfaction of these mission areas.
    2. Graduates will examine the roles, responsibilities, and relationships of National and DoD organizations in establishing policies, priorities, and requirements for National Security Space systems; and in the design, acquisition, operation, and exploitation of these systems.
    3. Graduates will examine the role of the Services / Agencies in establishing required space system capabilities, and will translate these capabilities into system performance requirements.
    4. Graduates will examine: current and planned Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities; how space systems contribute to these capabilities; the intelligence collection and analysis process; and how war-fighters access information from these sources.
  4. Project Management and System Acquisition:
    1. Graduates will examine project management and DoD system acquisition methods and procedures to include contract management, financial management and control, and the Planning, Programming, Budgeting and Execution System (PPBE).