Lithium Battery News and Events

Lithium Battery News and Events


Update - 5 November 2019

 

Another promising technology promises to enable a stable solar heat storage solution. If it’s heat that’s needed, this might be much better than a battery. And no exotic elements just Hydrogen, Nitrogen, and Carbon.

 


Update - 1 April 2019

 

The US Navy has insisted on rigorous consumer product safety standards for all Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) Navy purchased lithium battery systems.  The marketplace knows that a low price can bring in buyers, but when that low price is at the expense of lithium battery safety, the resulting fire hazards and catastrophes can cost more than any small savings up front. 

 

Forbes posted a good article of fires on eBikes.  Because eBikes might be charged, one of the riskiest operations for many batteries, very near each other in charging racks an ignition might propagate.  This can increase the severity of an already elevated probable ignition risk. 

 

eBikes also might be subject to heat stress during operations, which increases likelihood of thermal runaway, ignition, fire, and explosion.  This video shows how unfortunately ineffective a fire extinguisher might mitigate a lithium battery eBike fire.”

 


Update - 31 JULY 2017

 

Lithium Batteries behaving badly on flights have taken the headlines again. And again, it is carry-on systems grabbing attention. A battery meltdown caused a domestic JetBlue flight to divert when smoke and heat forced the crew to assume the worst.

 

Fortunately, limits on carry-on lithium batteries also limit the severity of any potential ignition, and in this case, the battery was isolated and allowed to run its course without causing more than alarm and damage to itself. However, heed the limits, as airlines take safety very seriously, and look to discourage violators with federally backed fines and penalties up to $50K per violation, which can add up for a pile of batteries! Ask MIT. For any transportation related questions about lithium batteries, contact Lithium Battery Safety program lead Scott Giles at x7568, or HAZMAT coordinator Kathleen Franklin x7661

 


Update - 31 MAY 2017

Need a nano-battery? Porous silicon supercapacitors can potentially be printed into the next generation of silicon computer chips. Results from research in Finland indicate porous silicon coated with titanium nitride and fashioned into supercapictor structures may be characterized by energy densities as high as those associated with lithium batteries, and beat lithium batteries for power density. Here is a [link] to a review of the work.

 


Update - 18 MAY 2017

 

Maybe it’s time to Think Zinc. NRL researchers have been working with zinc battery architectures that claim less expensive materials than lithium batteries, much improved safety, and promises to rival lithium for power and cycle life. Here is a link to a review of the original Science article.

 


Update - 18 APR 2017

 

The Vaping Lamp is out. E-cigarettes have an all-too-common failure mode where the batteries overheat and explode. Navy Ship operations have been disrupted. Navy Aircraft have been forced into emergency landings. And sailors have suffered facially disfiguring injuries. The Naval Safety Center maintains E-cigarettes pose an unacceptable risk to Navy personnel, facilities, submarines, ships, vessels and aircraft and recommended a full ban of the products on Navy property. U.S. Fleet Forces and U.S. Pacific Fleet jointly announced the ban aboard ships, submarines, aircraft, and heavy equipment on Friday, 14 April, 2017.

https://www.navytimes.com/articles/navy-bans-e-cigarettes-fleet-wide


Update - 17 MAR 2017

 

Great work by the System Engineering Department to secure NAVSEA Authorization of the 20V DeWalt battery system for Dewalt cordless toolsets. This common toolset was no excepted by the NAVSEA S9310 TECHMAN as UL listed Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) equipment because it was greater than the limit of 18 Volts. NAVSEA noted this system contained 10 Brand Name UL certified battery cells that were similar to larger capacity Brand Name cells of the same size that had been subject to a full complement of NSWC testing. NAVSEA also noted two major contributors to the overall abuse tolerance of the packs were two current interrupt devices and a positive temperature coefficient (PTC) device. The Dewalt Authorization can be viewed here.

 


Update - 16 MAR 2017

 

Kudos to the Meteorology Department for securing NAVSEA Authorization of Vaisala Radiosondes with the lithium battery power packs for airborne operations. The Radiosondes have a three cell primary pack which exceedes the excepted commercial system limit of NAVSEA S9310 TECHMAN of 2 cells. NAVSEA cited previous certification of this system in a different application, blanket certification of CRl23A type cells, low energy content, and presence of a 2A current fuse. The Vaisala Authorization can be viewed here.

 


Update - 5 DEC 2016

 

30 November 2016. Excellent work by the NPS Oceanography Department and Chris Miller to secure NAVSEA Authorization of the SAFT A size batteries in the Acousonde 3A data recorders. This one cell lithium Thionyl Chloride battery was not excepted by Section 3-5 the NAVSEA S9310 TECHMAN. The SAFT LS 17500 is 3.6 Ah per cell, which exceeds the excepted limit of 3.0 Ah per cell.

 

NAVSEA noted this battery had been UL rated, and could be Authorized by similarity (without extensive testing) since it was previously reviewed or tested notably in the Modi Counter Improvised Explosive Device system, and the Joint Tactical Radio System. This Acousonde 3A Authorization was provided only for NPS researchers at NPS and aboard Marine research vessels. Chris, kudos to your Oceanography team for supporting the NPS (and Navy) Lithium Battery Safety Program. You can operate this system with the confidence that it has been reviewed and authorized by the Navy’s most specialized lithium battery technical agents, warrant holders, and testers.

 

The Letter from Naval Sea Systems Command (SEA 05Z34) Authorizing the use of Saft part number (P/N) LS17500 lithium/thionyl chloride (Li/SOC12 ) battery in the Acoustimetrics Acousonde 3A system may be viewed HERE.


Update - 12 SEPT 2016

 

Samsung’s explanation for its recent Galaxy 7 battery issues:  “the quality control standards in the production process may have been insufficient.”  While commercial partners may be able to afford a $1.3 billion recall for exploding batteries, the Navy cannot.  Fires in aircraft, submarines, or ships from equipment powered by poorly produced batteries could result in monumentally larger losses or tragedy.  The Lithium Battery Safety Program requires acquisition reporting of all Lithium batteries, and formal authorization requests for any Lithium Battery System not nominally excepted as small or COTS as defined by the NAVSEA S9310 TECHMAN.  To read the latest on Samsung’s conundrum, here’s the state of affairs as of 5 SEPT 16 


Update - 1 NOV 2016

 

Even Toyota has revealed plans to abandoned NiCd battery packs in the Prime variant of its enormously popular (and safe) Prius lineup in favor of [adopting a specifically designed lithium battery system].  Toyota previously has stated that it regards lithium batteries as too hazardous for vehicle use, and has instead focused on hydrogen technology.  However after considerable analysis of engineering controls, management, and safeguards for their vehicles, they are announcing a shift.  NPS encourages operations, (with engineering controls, management, and safeguards appropriately applied) of lithium batteries where missions required it.

 

You can read more about Toyota's plans to adopt Lithium-ion battery technology in their vehicles at this link:  http://fortune.com/2016/10/31/toyota-prius-prime-lithium-batteries/

 

For a review of NPS best practices and requirements, follow the link to the NPS LiPo SOP 1.4 series, or the gouge. 


Update - 12 SEPT 2016

 

Samsung’s explanation for its recent Galaxy 7 battery issues:  “the quality control standards in the production process may have been insufficient.”  While commercial partners may be able to afford a $1.3 billion recall for exploding batteries, the Navy cannot.  Fires in aircraft, submarines, or ships from equipment powered by poorly produced batteries could result in monumentally larger losses or tragedy.  The Lithium Battery Safety Program requires acquisition reporting of all Lithium batteries, and formal authorization requests for any Lithium Battery System not nominally excepted as small or COTS as defined by the NAVSEA S9310 TECHMAN.  To read the latest on Samsung’s conundrum, here’s the state of affairs as of 5 SEPT 16 


Update - 4 AUG 2016

 

Tesla is innovating batteries, including the physical size. Will we soon see the new 21700 ubiquitous? To see the state of the art in the mass production of Lithium energy storage, here’s a review of a Giga-Factory tour.


Update - 15 JUL 2016

 

Fantastic work by the Persistent Radio team lead by John Gibson of the Computer Science Department. NAVSEA and NSWC approved the Brentronics 28.8V lithium battery pack for the Harris RF-7800M Radios for use in the lab, field, and YES, up and away on weather balloons! This relatively rapid response for Authorization marks a landmark in the teaming relationship of NPS, NSWC, and NAVSEA to provide project teams with timely and relevant hazard analysis, mitigation, and final documented approval decision. Special Thank to John and Charles Prince for their technical work that motivated the process, and support for the Navy and NPS Lithium Battery Safety program.


Update - 3 JUN 2016

 

An airline manufacture has worked with a battery industrial partner to provide safe and effective lithium battery energy storage for commercial aircraft functions.  The Airbus 350-900 is seeking FAA approval on its design that includes Saft rechargeable lithium ion batteries to serve as a back-up power source for the avionics system and to start the auxiliary power unit.  The energy density of lithium batteries makes them particularly desirable for aviation functions, although the safety concerns must be addressed.  The Boeing 787 realized lithium battery hazards almost immediately in 2013, but has since improved the design to considerably reduce the severity of future incidents.

https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/lithium-ion-batteries-fly-again-on-a350-900-425894/


Update - 13 MAY 2016

 

NPS Lithium Battery Policy was formalized last week (09 May 2016) to prioritize “non-excepted’ Formal Lithium Battery Authorization Requests over those systems that meet exception criteria.

 

The NPS Lithium Battery Safety Program has made every effort with available resources to comply administratively and in spirit with the NAVSEA guidance promulgated in NAVSEA (310.1C (2015) and the “TECHMAN” NAVSEA S9310-AQ-SAF-101 Second Revision (2011). 

 

Chapter 3 of the TECHMAN lists specific requirements for various classes of lithium batteries and lithium battery systems.  Some NPS lithium batteries and lithium battery systems qualify as “excepted” from testing, review, or approval by Technical Agents, Administrative Leads, or Technical Warrant Holders.  Some are not.  Those lithium batteries and lithium battery systems that are not excepted from testing, review, or approval often are batteries or systems that operate at higher power, contain higher energy, are larger size, contain more cells, reach higher voltages, or lack certification of national or international safety standards. 

 

Some lithium batteries and lithium battery systems meet all the requirements specified in Section 3 of the TECHMAN for exception from testing, yet still require a Formal Authorization Request Letter.  These systems are:

 

   a)  “Small” Rechargeable Batteries:  One battery, 1- 2 cells, no more than 3 Ah per cell

   b)  Non-rechargeable Batteries:  UL Listed, unmodified COTS, 1-2 cells, no more than 3Ah per cell, or 9 volt PP3 size snap connector battery, designed for commercial use

   c)  Non-rechargeable:  Specific Navy use, 1- 2 cells, no more than 3Ah per cell, protected from other electric power by blocking diodes and resistors.

 

 

NPS will assign resources for Formal Authorization Request Letters first to lithium batteries and lithium battery systems that fail to meet the exception criteria of Section 3 of the TECHMAN, then to lithium batteries and lithium battery systems that meet all the exception criteria of Section 3 of the TECHMAN. 

 

All NPS lithium batteries and lithium battery systems, whether meeting excepted criteria or not, are directed to submit all other required acquisition reports, and follow the remaining guidance of the TECHMAN for use, charging (if applicable), maintenance, storage, transportation, disposal, and manufacture’s guidance.


Update - 12 MAY 2016

What happens when Lasers are applied to Lithium Batteries?  This May, an extra special news event as two of NPS’s favorite research elements are paired to laser generate 3D capillary battery architectures where researchers achieve large energy capacities while maintaining high power densities at the same time.


Update - 29 MAR 2016

Great news for NPS Information Warfare projects using the Harris RF-7800-HH (Hand Held) Falcon III PRC-152A radios with the Harris 10.8V, 63Whr Lithium batteries.  NSWC Carderock issued the Authorizations last week.

 

With the local adoption of the controls from NAVSEA TECHMAN S9310, the NPS Harris AN/PRC-152 radios are now a complete Navy Lithium Battery system in full compliance with all Navy Lithium Battery Safety requirements.  The Harris battery system is AUTHORIZED for AN/PRC-152 radio use for Shore, Navy Surface Ship, Naval Aircraft, and MSC.  Looking forward to hearing the results as the teams progress on their research projects!


Update - 17 MAR 2016

NAVSEA has updated the Lithium Battery Hazards Awareness presentation.  We'll look for an opportunity to bring Julie Simmons to NPS in the near future to speak to the excitement of managing these energy systems for the Navy.  Contact the LSSO for the presentation.