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COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

Note: This guidance was created for the Naval Postgraduate School population.  If you are from another command, the information provided here may be useful for you but it is also highly recommended that you check with your command safety office for any special guidance or considerations.

 

 

Coronavirus-Side

Virus

 

Local Guidance:
 

What to do if you think you have COVID-19? (pdf)

 

Am I at risk:

CDC COVID-19 risk assessment is as follows: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nCoV/summary.html

  1. For most of the American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus at this time, the immediate health risk from COVID-19 is considered low.

  2. People in communities where ongoing community spread with the virus that causes COVID-19 has been reported are at elevated, though still relatively low risk of exposure.

  3. Healthcare workers caring for patients with COVID-19 are at elevated risk of exposure.

  4. Close contacts of persons with COVID-19 also are at elevated risk of exposure.

  5. Travelers returning from affected international locations where community spread is occurring also are at elevated risk of exposure. https://travel.state.gov/content/travel/en/traveladvisories/traveladvisories.html/

If you are sick (more information below):

  1. Am I at risk?

  2. Stay home when you are sick.

  3. Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  4. Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

Prevention:

There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after going to the bathroom; before eating; and after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing.

  • If soap and water are not readily available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol. Always wash hands with soap and water if hands are visibly dirty.

  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Stay home when you are sick.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces using a regular household cleaning spray or wipe.

For information about handwashing, see CDC’s Handwashing website

For information specific to healthcare, see CDC’s Hand Hygiene in Healthcare Settings

These are everyday habits that can help prevent the spread of several viruses. CDC does have specific guidance for travelers.

Symptoms:

For confirmed 2019-nCoV infections, reported illnesses have ranged from people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying. Symptoms can include:

  • Fever

  • Cough

  • Shortness of Breath

CDC believes at this time that symptoms of 2019-nCoV may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 after exposure. This is based on what has been seen previously as the incubation period of MERS viruses.

The latest situation summary updates are available on CDC's webpage 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China.
 

What to do if you are sick:


If you are sick with shortness of breath/cough + Fever/chills and/or traveled from at risk area or close contact with someone who has:

Do not go to ER.

IF YOU HAVE SCREENED POSITIVE FOR COVID-19, OR ARE QUARANTINED AWAITING RESULTS 
    • Call the Presidio of Monterey Department of Public Health at 831-242-4826 or 
    • Monterey County Health Department (MCHD) at 831-755-4521
    • Outside business hours, please call MAJ Jodi Brown at 831-234-9510 or
    • MCHD afterhours line at 831-755-5100 for further instructions. 

*Supervisors: Notify Chain of command, Deans and Directors send e-mail (ajcolon@nps.edu ) with information (sans names) of personnel sick.  
 

What to do if you were sick and returning to work


PurposePromulgate information on what to do if you were sick during COVID-19 Pandemic and return to work 

Actions:  Notify your supervisor*

1.If you have recovered from FLU-like symptoms.

a.After free of the following for at least 24 hours, without the use of fever-reducing or other symptom-altering medicines (e.g. cough suppressants):

  • Fever (100.4° F [38° C] or greater using an oral thermometer),
  • Symptoms of a fever (shivering, shaking, chills, body aches, headaches, excessive sweating, etc.)
  • Any other symptoms (sore throat, persistent cough, sinus congestion, fatigue, etc.)

b.Not everyone with flu will have a fever. 

  • Individuals with suspected or confirmed flu, who do not have a fever, should stay home from work at least 4-5 days after the onset of symptoms
  • Persons with the flu are most contagious during the first 3 days of their illness. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/business/stay-home-when-sick.htm

2.If you have tested positive and/or diagnosed with COVID-19:

NOTE: You will have already been working with and notified MAJ Brown, 831-234-9510 and a contact investigation would have been performed.  

a.Return to work is authorized: when medical provider has cleared you and MAJ Brown has been notified of results and using the below considerations.

i. Not based on FDA Lab Test:

  • At least 7 days have passed since symptoms first appeared and 
  • All symptoms are completely resolved or 
  • Until 14 days after illness onset, whichever is longer

ii. Based on Negative FDA Lab test:

  • 72 hours have passed since recovery from symptoms
  • Fever is gone, without the use of fever-reducing medications and
  • Respiratory symptoms gone (e.g., cough, shortness of breath), and
  • Negative 2 consecutive results of an FDA Emergency Use Authorized molecular assay for COVID-19 ≥24 hours apart (total of two negative results)

*Supervisors: Notify Chain of command, Deans and Directors send e-mail (ajcolon@nps.edu ) with information (sans names) of personnel recovering.  

Useful Contact information: 

Presidio of Monterey Department of Public Health at 831-242-4826 or 
Monterey County Health Department (MCHD) at 831-755-4521, 
Outside business hours, please call MAJ Jodi Brown at 831-234-9510 or
MCHD afterhours line at 831-755-5100

 

What to do if Homecare

PurposePromulgate information on what to do if you are executing home care COVID-19 Pandemic 

Actions:  Guidance for at Home Care:

Mechanics: Coronavirus is transmitted via larger liquid droplets when a person coughs or sneezes. The virus can enter through these droplets through the eyes, nose or throat if you are in close contact (within ~6ft or 3 m).  https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/about/prevention.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fabout%2Fprevention-treatment.html 

  • The virus is not known to be airborne (e.g. transmitted through the particles floating in the air) and it is not something that comes in through the skin.
  • It can be spread by touch if a person has used their hands to cover their mouth or nose when they cough. That’s why we recommend you cough or sneeze into your arm and wash your hands regularly.
  • Surgical masks should be used by sick people to prevent transmission to other people. A mask will help keep a person's droplets in. 

Recommendations: more detailed information can be found here; https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-home-care.html

  • Isolation is defined as the separation or restriction of activities of an ill person with a contagious disease from those who are well.
  • Quarantine is defined as the separation or restriction of movement of NOT-sick persons who might have been exposed to a communicable disease while determining if they become ill.

Quarantine:

For the health of your family, friends and community, you need to stay at home. That means do not have visitors and do not go to work or school, public areas, including places of worship, stores, shopping malls and restaurants. You can use delivery/pick up services for groceries or other needs but avoid face to face contact.   https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/home/cleaning-disinfection.html 

No need for separate washers and dryers.

Isolation:

If Isolation is required: the CDC recommendations are at https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/hcp/guidance-prevent-spread.html

  • Assess whether the residential setting is suitable and appropriate for home care;
  • Assess whether the patient is capable of adhering to precautions that will be recommended as part of home care or isolation (respiratory hygiene, hand hygiene, etc.); and
  • Contact local or state health department to notify them that the residential setting has been determined to be suitable for home care and that hospital discharge is planned. 
  • CALMED PH 831-242-4826 or the 
  • Monterey County Health Department (MCHD) at 831-755-4521.
  • After business hours (evenings/weekends) they can call the MCHD after hours line at 831-755-5100

Avoid contaminating common items and surfaces

  • At least once daily, clean and disinfect surfaces that you touch often, like toilets, bedside tables, doorknobs, phones and television remotes.
  • Do not share personal items with others, such as toothbrushes, towels, bed linen, utensils or electronic devices.
  • Use regular household disinfectants or diluted bleach (1 part bleach and 9 parts water) to disinfect.
  • Place contaminated items that cannot be cleaned in a lined container, secure the contents and dispose of them with other household waste.
  • Put the lid of the toilet down before flushing
  • Arrange to have groceries and supplies dropped off at your door to minimize contact.
  • Stay in a separate room and use a separate bathroom from others in your home, if possible.
  • If you have to be in contact with others, keep at least 6ft between yourself and the other person. Keep interactions brief and wear a mask.
  • Avoid contact with individuals with chronic conditions, compromised immune systems and older adults.  
  • Avoid contact with pets if you live with other people that may also be touching the pet.

For Quarantine or Isolation:

Keep your hands clean

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, and dry with disposable paper towels or dry reusable towel, replacing it when it becomes wet.
  • You can also remove dirt with a wet wipe and then use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Cough or sneeze into the bend of your arm or into a tissue.

Care for yourself

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/community/home/cleaning-disinfection.html 

  • No need for separate washers and dryers.
  • Monitor your symptoms as directed by your health care provider or public health authority.
  • If your symptoms get worse, immediately contact your health care provider or public health authority and follow their instructions.
    • CALMED PH 831-242-4826 or the 
    • Monterey County Health Department (MCHD) at 831-755-4521.
    • After business hours (evenings/weekends) they can call the MCHD after hours line at 831-755-5100

Supplies to have at home (primarily for Isolation)

  • Surgical/procedure masks (do not re-use)
  • Eye protection
  • Disposable gloves (do not re-use)
  • Disposable paper towels
  • Tissues
  • Waste container with plastic liner
  • Thermometer
  • Over the counter medication to reduce fever (e.g., ibuprofen or acetaminophen)
  • Running water
  • Hand soap
  • Alcohol-based sanitizer containing at least 60% alcohol
  • Dish soap
  • Regular laundry soap
  • Regular household cleaning products
  • Bleach (5% sodium hypochlorite) and a separate container for dilution (1-part bleach to 9 parts water)
  • Alcohol prep wipes
  • Arrange to have your groceries delivered to you

 

DoD Guidance

Effective immediately as the result of the ongoing Novel Coronavirus outbreak,  CDR USINDOPACOM has prohibited all DOD travel in mainland China until further notice.  This restriction includes military members (active, guard, and reserve), civilians, and contractors.  The blanket prohibition extends to connections at all Chinese airports, irrespective of the length layover/stopover and is consistent with the Department of State’s “Level 4: Do Not Travel” advisory.

The DoD will follow the regularly updated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidance for this outbreak, found at: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

This memorandum provides additional information and guidance regarding Novel Coronavirus (NPS User Account Log in Required).

Risk to DoD Personnel: Per the CDC, identifying a person at risk, or Patients Under Investigation (PUI), is based on symptoms and exposure history; additional criteria are here.
The risk to DoD personnel who do not meet the PUI criteria is low.  
 

Risk Assessment

Outbreaks of novel virus infections among people are always of public health concern. The risk from these outbreaks depends on characteristics of the virus, including whether and how well it spreads between people, the severity of resulting illness, and the medical or other measures available to control the impact of the virus (for example, vaccine or treatment medications).

This is a very serious public health threat. The fact that this virus has caused severe illness and sustained person-to-person spread in China is concerning, but it’s unclear how the situation in the United States will unfold at this time.

The risk to individuals is dependent on exposure. At this time, some people will have an increased risk of infection, for example healthcare workers caring for 2019-nCoV patients and other close contacts. For the general American public, who are unlikely to be exposed to this virus, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV is considered low. The goal of the ongoing U.S. public health response is to prevent sustained spread of 2019-nCov in this country.
 

Virus Background

CDC is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus (named “2019-nCoV”) that was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China and which continues to expand. Chinese health officials have reported thousands of infections with 2019-nCoV in China, with the virus reportedly spreading from person-to-person in many parts of that country. Infections with 2019-nCoV, most of them associated with travel from Wuhan, also are being reported in a growing number of international locations, including the United States. The United States reported the first confirmed instance of person-to-person spread with this virus on January 30, 2020. On January 30, 2020, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee of the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a “public health emergency of international concernexternal icon” (PHEIC).

On January 31, 2020, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex M. Azar II declared a public health emergency (PHE) for the United States to aid the nation’s healthcare community in responding to 2019-nCoV. Also on January 31, the President of the United States signed a presidential “Proclamation on Suspension of Entry as Immigrants and Nonimmigrants of Persons who Pose a Risk of Transmitting 2019 Novel Coronavirusexternal icon“. These measures were announced at a press briefing by members of the President’s Coronavirus Task Forceexternal icon. 

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS, SARS, and now with 2019-nCoV.

 

Coronavirus-Body

Update - 17 March 2020

First Two Cases Reported in Monterey County

 

Update - 12 March 2020

A warning from the Department of Health and Human Services about malicious website.

 

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY: A malicious website pretending to be the live map for Coronavirus COVID-19 Global Cases by Johns Hopkins University is circulating on the internet waiting for unwitting internet users to visit the website. Visiting the website infects the user with the AZORult trojan, an information stealing program which can exfiltrate a variety of sensitive data. It is likely being spread via infected email attachments, malicious online advertisements, and social engineering. Furthermore, anyone searching the internet for a Coronavirus map could unwittingly navigate to this malicious website.

THREAT DETAILS: A sample of the malware being deployed by "corona-virus-map[dot]com" was submitted and analyzed by and received an extremely malicious threat score of 100/100 with Anti-virus (AV) detection at 76%. This sample was labelled by Hybrid-Analysis as a Trojan.

RECOMMENDATIONS: End users should be warned about this cybersecurity risk and security teams should blacklist any indicators associated with this specific threat. IOCs and Analysis may be found here: https://blog.reasonsecurity.com/2020/03/09/covid-19-info-stealer-the-map-of-threats-threat-analysis-report/

REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION: Requests for Information Need information on a specific cybersecurity topic? Send your request for information (RFI) to HC3@HHS.GOV or call us Monday-Friday, between 9am-Spm (EST), at (202) 691-2110.

 

A copy of the white paper about this from HHS can be found HERE.

 

Update - 9 March 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • As of 9 MAR, 28 suspected PUIs being evaluated by DoD (Japan, Kuwait & the U.S.).
    • The latest confirmed case is a SM from Quantico Marine Corps Base with a history of travel to Ethiopia. This is the first CONUS DoD case. Contact tracing ongoing.
  • Grand Princess Cruise ship docked in Oakland, CA, with 21 COVID-19 positive cases.
    • Non-COVID-19 positive passengers to be transferred to federal military installations for medical screening, COVID-19 testing, and 14-day quarantine.
  • As of 9 MAR, 72 U.S. public health state labs can test with CDC assay; DoD-affiliated clinicians can access such labs within the same jurisdiction if testing unavailable at MTF.
  • AFHSD continues to assess the public health threat of COVID-19 infection as moderate.

 

Update - 6 March 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • As of 6 MAR, 62 U.S. public health state labs can test with CDC assay; DoD-affiliated clinicians can access such labs when not available at MTF and in same jurisdiction.
  • Contradicting reports on test capacity in the U.S.; FDA stated ~1 million tests by 6 MAR versus Association of Public Health Laboratories statement of only ~10,000 tests.
  • MTFs in OCONUS locations without testing capability are accepting host nation testing results and sending specimens to CDC for confirmation.

 

Update - 3 March 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • 60 confirmed and presumptive positive cases of COVID-19
  • 6 COVID-19 related deaths
  • 12 states reporting cases of COVID-19
  • Nonpharmaceutical interventions are actions, apart from getting vaccinated and taking medicine, that people and communities can take to help slow the spread of respiratory illnesses like COVID-19.
  • On March 3, a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) Update was published titled “Active Monitoring of Persons Exposed to Patients with Confirmed COVID-19 — United States, January–February 2020.” (See Section “MMWR Update.”)
  • As of March 3, 2020, 68 international locations (including the U.S.) have reported confirmed cases of COVID-19.
  • 60 reported cases of COVID-19 have been detected in Arizona, California, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington and Wisconsin.
    • 11 of these cases occurred through person-to-person spread.
    • 22 cases all were in persons who had travel to China.
    • 27 cases where the source of exposure is still under investigation.
  • As of March 3, CDC issued Travel Health Notices for the following locations:
    • Level 3 Travel Health Notice (avoid non-essential travel): China, Iran, South Korea, and Italy
    • Level 2 Travel Health Notices (Practice Enhanced Precautions): Japan
    • Level 1 (practice usual precautions): Hong Kong
  • The CDC Also Recommends that all travelers reconsider cruise ship voyages into or within Asia at this time. This is consistent with guidance by the U.S. State Department

 

Reporting:

  • More public health laboratories are able to test for the virus that causes COVID-19, and they are reporting their results publicly.
  • Because states are reporting publicly directly, sometimes in near real-time, CDC case counts may be different from what states, local authorities, or media are reporting.
  • If there are discrepancies between case counts reported by state or local officials versus CDC reported numbers, the numbers provided by states will be the most up-to-date.
  • State health laboratories are reporting their results to CDC.
  • CDC is consolidating state reports and combining them with CDC confirmed test results and presenting a national aggregated case count daily from Monday through Friday.
  • Case counts submitted to CDC by 4pm the prior day will be posted at noon.
  • CDC is reporting cumulative confirmed and presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 in the United States since January 21, 2020.
  • CDC is presenting data related to people who were repatriated via U.S. State Department flights from Wuhan, China and from the Diamond Princess cruise ship (Japan) in a separate chart available on the CDC website.
  • CDC has discontinued reporting of the numbers of persons under investigation (PUIs) tested and those that tested negative.
  • Now that states are testing and reporting their own results, CDC’s numbers will not be representative of all the testing being done nationwide.

MMWR Update:

What You Can Do:

Everyone can do their part to help us respond to this emerging public health threat:

  • It’s currently flu and respiratory disease season and CDC recommends getting a flu vaccine, taking everyday preventive actions to help stop the spread of germs, and taking flu antivirals if prescribed.
  • Individuals and communities should familiarize themselves with recommendations to protect themselves and their community from getting and spreading respiratory illnesses like coronavirus disease 2019.
  • If you are a healthcare provider, be on the look-out for people who have been in close contact with a person known to have COVID-19, and people who live in or have recently been in an area with ongoing spread, and have fever and respiratory symptoms.
  • If you are a healthcare provider caring for a COVID-19 patient or a public health responder, please take care of yourself and follow recommended infection control procedures.
  • If you have recently been to an area with ongoing spread of COVID-19 or have been exposed to someone sick with COVID-19 in the last 14 days, you may face some limitations on your movement and activity. Please follow instructions during this time. Your cooperation is integral to the ongoing public health response to try to slow spread of this virus. If you develop COVID-19 symptoms, contact your healthcare provider, and tell them about your symptoms and your travel or exposure to a COVID-19 patient.
  • For people who have had close contact with someone with COVID-19 who develop symptoms, contact your healthcare provider, and tell them about your symptoms and your exposure to a COVID-19 patient.
  • For people who are ill with COVID-19, please follow CDC guidance on how to reduce the risk of spreading your illness to others.

CDC Actions:

  • The federal government is working closely with state, local, tribal, and territorial partners, as well as public health partners, to respond to this public health threat.
  • The public health response is multi-layered, with the goal of detecting and minimizing introductions of this virus in the United States to reduce the spread and the impact of this virus.
  • CDC is operationalizing all of its pandemic preparedness and response plans, working on multiple fronts to meet these goals, including specific measures to prepare communities to respond local transmission of the virus that causes COVID-19.
  • Pandemic guidance developed in anticipation of an influenza pandemic is being repurposed and adapted for a COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Public health partners are encouraged to review their pandemic preparedness plans at this time.
  • CDC is aggressively responding to the global outbreak of COVID-19 and preparing for the potential of community spread in the United States.
  • CDC’s Action for Preparing Communities for Potential Spread of COVID-19 include:
    • Preparing first responders, healthcare providers, and health systems
    • Reinforcing state, territorial, and local public health readiness
    • Supporting communities, businesses, and schools

Community Based Interventions (AKA Community Mitigation):

  • Americans should be prepared for the possibility of a COVID-19 outbreak in their community. Everyone has a role to play.
  • Currently a vaccine is not available for COVID-19. Until a vaccine is developed, community-based interventions, such as school dismissals, event cancellations, social distancing, plans to work remotely can help slow the spread of coronavirus.
  • Your local public health department and community partners have been preparing for an event, like COVID-19 and have plans in place. Now is a good time for businesses, community and faith-based organizations, schools, and health-care systems to reexamine their preparedness plans to make sure they are ready.
  • Strong community partnerships between local health departments, the health care sector, faith-based organizations, and other community partners are vital for this response, and will be necessary to prepare for and coordinate if an outbreak occurs.

Community based interventions can be grouped in three categories:

  • Personal protective measures (e.g., voluntary home isolation of ill persons, voluntary home quarantine of exposed household members, covering nose/mouth when coughing or sneezing, hand hygiene, using face masks in community settings when ill)
  • Community measures aimed at increasing social distancing (e.g., school dismissals, social distancing in workplaces, postponing or cancelling mass gatherings)
  • Environmental measures (e.g., routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces)

CDC has recommendations to protect yourself and your community from getting and spreading respiratory illnesses like coronavirus disease 2019.

For more information please visit the Coronavirus Disease 2019 Outbreak Page at: www.cdc.gov/COVID19 .

 

Update - 2 March 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • CDC reports 100 confirmed U.S. cases (6 deaths); 52 detected through local surveillance and 48 detected among repatriated AMCITS from Wuhan & Diamond Princess cruise ship.
  • Possible community spread occurred in California, Oregon and Washington among people with no travel history and no known source of exposure. These cases include one case in a health care worker, four deaths in a potential outbreak in a long-term care facility in Washington. 
  • Data/results are pending for the three DoD clinical laboratories with EUA kits on hand.
  • Rapid increase to 1,694 cases (34 deaths) in Italy over past two weeks.
  • US DoS issued a Travel Advisory Level 4 (Do Not Travel) for Lombardy and Veneto regions of Italy; Travel Advisory Level 3 (Reconsider Travel) for the rest of Italy
  • INDOPACOM and USFJ issued Mission Essential Only travel to RoK on 27 FEB.
  • USFK remains at HPCON Charlie for Korean Peninsula since 25 FEB.
  • DoS Issued a Travel Advisory Level 4 for Daegu (3,081cases).
  • As of 2 MAR, 4,335 total cases in ROK, to include 26 deaths.
  • As of 2 MAR, there have been 80,026 cases in mainland China; and at least 5,000 cases elsewhere in INDOPACOM.

Update - 28 FEB 2020

  • As of 26 FEB, confirmed COVID-19 cases have been reported in at least one country in each U.S. Geographic Combatant Command. From mid-DEC 2019 to 27 FEB 2020, 78,947 cases (2,747 deaths) have been reported in mainland China. Additionally, 4,051 confirmed cases (64 deaths) have been reported in 49 countries and regions outside of mainland China, including USINDOPACOM (15), USAFRICOM (1), USCENTCOM (10), USEUCOM (20), USNORTHCOM (2), and USSOUTHCOM (1).
  • As of 27 FEB, CDC has reported 61 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S., including 15 cases detected via public health surveillance (AZ (1), CA (9), IL (2), MA (1), WA (1), and WI (1)), and 46 cases in repatriated American citizens from Wuhan City, China (3), and the Diamond Princess cruise ship (43). On 26 FEB, CDC reported the first U.S. COVID-19 case in an individual from Solano County, northern CA, who did not have relevant travel history or exposure to another COVID-19 case. CDC also reported that this case could be an instance of community spread of COVID-19, which would be the first time in the U.S. It is also possible, however, that the case may have been exposed to a returned traveler who was infected. No COVID-19-associated deaths have been reported in the U.S.
  • As of 27 FEB, 12 of the 14 authorized/approved CONUS and OCONUS DoD clinical laboratories have received COVID-19 diagnostic testing kits from CDC. Three DoD laboratories (NHRC, WBAMC, WAMC) have been approved to conduct diagnostic testing for COVID-19. Test results will be validated at CDC for a period of time, after which the laboratories will perform their own testing and report results to CDC.
  • CASE REPORT: As of 27 FEB, 78,947 (+3,169) confirmed cases of COVID-19, including 2,747 (+627) deaths have been reported in mainland China since mid-DEC 2019. The majority (84%) of cases in mainland China have been reported from Hubei Province, where Wuhan City, the epicenter of the outbreak, is located. On 20 FEB, WHO noted a significant decline in newly confirmed cases due to another change in China’s case reporting; after reporting both clinically-diagnosed and laboratory-confirmed cases for Hubei Province from 13-19 FEB, the country has reverted to reporting only lab-confirmed cases. On 24 FEB, the team from the joint WHO-China mission reported that the COVID-19 epidemic peaked and plateaued in China between 23 JAN and 2 FEB, and has been declining steadily since then. They also found that the case fatality proportion (CFP) is 2-4% in Wuhan City (Hubei Province) and in Iran, but is 0.7% elsewhere. A recent report by the China CDC found that of 44,672 confirmed cases in mainland China, the CFP was highest among cases >80 years old (14.8%), compared to 10-39 year olds (0.2%), 40-49 year olds (0.4%), and 5-10.5% among cases with pre-existing comorbidities. As of 25 FEB, 3,008 (+5) cases have been reported in healthcare workers (HCWs) globally: in mainland China (3,000), the Republic of Korea (5), the United Kingdom (UK) (2), and France (1) (see table). At least six deaths have been reported in HCWs in mainland China.
  • As of 26 FEB, COVID-19 has been reported in at least one country in each U.S. Geographic Combatant Command. As of 27 FEB, at least 4,051 (+2,836) cases of COVID-19 have been reported in 49 (+20) countries and regions outside of mainland China, including 15 countries/regions in INDOPACOM, 20 (+11) in EUCOM, ten (+7) in CENTCOM, two in NORTHCOM, one in AFRICOM, and one in SOUTHCOM (see table). On 26 FEB, CDC reported the first U.S. COVID-19 case in an individual from Solano County, northern CA, who did not have relevant travel history or exposure to another COVID-19 case. CDC also reported that this case could be an instance of community spread of COVID-19, which would be the first time in the U.S. It is also possible, however, that the case may have been exposed to a returned traveler who was infected. The case is being treated in isolation at UC Davis Medical Center. As of 24 FEB, CDC is separating confirmed COVID-19 cases in U.S. citizens into two categories: cases detected through U.S. public health surveillance systems, and cases among those repatriated via U.S. State Department flights from Wuhan City, and from the Diamond Princess cruise ship. As of 27 FEB, CDC has reported 61 confirmed COVID-19 cases in the U.S., including 15 cases detected via public health surveillance (AZ (1), CA (9 (+1)), IL (2), MA (1), WA (1), and WI (1)), and 46 cases in repatriated American citizens from Wuhan City (3) and the Diamond Princess cruise ship (43). No COVID-19-associated deaths have been reported in the U.S.
  • As of 27 FEB, 705 (+71) confirmed cases of COVID-19 have been identified among the crew and passengers of the Diamond Princess cruise ship, which is anchored at Yokohama Port, in Japanese territorial waters. As of 26 FEB, 109 U.S. citizens (passengers and crew) remain in Japan, of which 68 have been admitted to local infectious disease hospitals (62 confirmed COVID-19 cases, 6 with other health issues), 36 are in quarantine, and five are Diamond Princess crew members still onboard in ship. A travel restriction issued by DHS/CDC on 18 FEB stipulates that all remaining American citizens aboard the Diamond Princess will not be allowed to travel back to the U.S. via commercial aircraft until an additional 14 days have passed from the dates of their release from the Diamond Princess.
  • While the majority of COVID-19 cases reported outside mainland China are travel-associated, local transmission has been documented in three countries/regions in CENTCOM, two in NORTHCOM, four in EUCOM, and nine (+1) in INDOPACOM. Of the 528 cases reported in Italy, 305 (58%) have occurred in Lombardy Region; 98 (19%) in Veneto Region; and 97 (18%) in Emilia Romagna Region. At least three of the 14 deaths in Italy and many of the newly recorded cases in the country do not appear to have a clear epidemiological link to China or previously confirmed cases. On 21 FEB, the Lombardy Government and Italian Ministry of Health ordered the closure of all public and commercial activities in ten small towns in Southern Lombardy centered around the town of Codogno, a 45-60 minute drive from Vicenza. On 24 FEB, USAG Italy announced that it would be closing all Vicenza Military Community (VMC) DoD Education Activity (DODEA) schools and activities from 24-28 FEB as a precautionary measure. USAG Italy has also directed DoD personnel to limit non-essential travel to the Comune di Vo’ Euganeo and the Lombardy Region. As of 27 FEB, no COVID-19 cases have been reported in the city of Vicenza, or among MHS beneficiaries in the VMC or Darby and Ghedi military communities.
  • The 32-fold increase in cases reported from the ROK since 18 FEB is largely due to two new clusters of human-to-human transmission in and near Daegu, the fourth-largest city in the country. As of 27 FEB, ROK has reported 1,776 confirmed COVID-19 cases (13 deaths) since 20 JAN, 97% of which have been reported in the past week. Over half of the new cases are linked to the Shincheonji Church of Jesus in Daegu. On 24 FEB, a senior health official leading the Infection Preventive Medicine Department in Daegu admitted to being a member of the church after developing symptoms, resulting in the quarantine of 50 other health officials. At least 12% of the new cases are linked to the psychiatric ward at Cheongdo Daenam Hospital, located in a town near Daegu. As of 25 FEB, at least five cases have been confirmed in HCWs.
  • CASE REPORT (cont’d): The 32-fold increase in cases reported from the ROK since 18 FEB is largely due to two new clusters of human-to-human transmission in and near Daegu, the fourth-largest city in the country. As of 27 FEB, ROK has reported 1,776 confirmed COVID-19 cases (13 deaths) since 20 JAN, 97% of which have been reported in the past week. Over half of the new cases are linked to the Shincheonji Church of Jesus in Daegu. On 24 FEB, a senior health official leading the Infection Preventive Medicine Department in Daegu admitted to being a member of the church after developing symptoms, resulting in the quarantine of 50 other health officials. At least 12% of the new cases are linked to the psychiatric ward at Cheongdo Daenam Hospital, located in a town near Daegu. As of 25 FEB, at least five cases have been confirmed in HCWs.
  • BACKGROUND: On 7 JAN, Chinese health officials reported the isolation of a coronavirus disease (subsequently labelled “COVID-19”) from a sample collected from one of 27 hospitalized cases of viral pneumonia of unknown etiology from Wuhan, China. Chinese health authorities subsequently made the full genetic sequence available through publicly accessible databases/platforms including GenBank and GISAID, enabling multiple countries to develop PCR assays for the detection of COVID-19. As of 27 JAN, assays and sequencing protocols have been released by China, Hong Kong, Germany, Japan, Thailand, and the U.S. Preliminary analysis of C OVID-19 found it to be 73% similar to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV).
  • TRANSMISSION: According to WHO’s latest estimates, the incubation period for COVID-19 (time from infection to development of symptoms) ranges from 2-10 days. Chinese authorities have estimated an upper limit of 14 days. China CDC’s latest estimate of the R0 (basic reproduction number) ranges from 2.0-3.0. For comparison, the R0 of SARS-CoV ranges from 2.0-5.0. R0 represents the expected number of people an infected individual could spread a virus to in a susceptible population. On 14 FEB, CDC reported that droplet spread (exposure within six feet of someone with respiratory symptoms) and contaminated surfaces (touching a droplet-contaminated surface and then touching the eyes and mouth) are major routes of transmission. Due to a worldwide surge in demand for personal protective equipment (PPE), CDC does not recommend that the general public wear face masks, instead suggesting handwashing, covering coughs, and staying home if ill. PPE should be reserved for suspected or conf irmed COVID-19 cases and HCWs who are caring for such patients.
  • The source of COVID-19 is still unknown, but is most likely an animal reservoir. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) has issued recommended precautionary measures to take with live animals or animal products. OIE is also closely liaising with its network of experts involved in c urrent investigations of the potential role of animals in the outbreak and the detection of SARS-CoV-2 in animals.
  • TRAVEL ADVISORIES: CDC is continuing to implement enhanced entry screening, and has expanded screening to include 20 international airports in the U.S. From 22-24 FEB, CDC issued “Warning – Level 3, Avoid Nonessential Travel” advisories for COVID-19 in China and the Republic of Korea (ROK . From 22-23 FEB, CDC issued “Alert – Level 2, Practice Enhanced Precautions” advisories for Japan, Iran, and Italy due to “sustained community transmission” of COVID-19. On 19 FEB, CDC issued a “Watch – Level 1, Practice Usual Precautions” for COVID-19 in Hong Kong. From 20-22 FEB, the U.S. Department of State (DoS) upgraded its travel advisory for Hong Kong to “Level 2: Exercise Increased Caution,” and issued Level 2 advisories for Japan and ROK. The DoS issued a “Level 4, Do Not Travel” advisory for China on 2 FEB, a “Level 1, Exercise Normal Precautions” advisory for Thailand on 7 FEB, and a “Level 2” advisory for Macao on 11 FEB.
  • TRAVEL ADVISORIES (cont’d): On 31 JAN, following WHO’s declaration of a PHEIC, the U.S. Secretary of DHHS declared COVID-19 a Public Health Emergency in the U.S. Starting 2 FEB, CDC has implemented the following travel restrictions: flights with travelers who have been to mainland China within the last 14 days will arrive at one of 11 designated ports for entry (international airports); any U.S. citizen who has been in Hubei Province within the previous 14 d ays will be subject to up to 14 days of mandatory quarantine; and any U.S. citizen returning to the U.S. who has been in the rest of mainland China within the previous 14 days will undergo proactive entry health screening and self- quarantine. Additionally, the President signed a Presidential Proclamation on 31 JAN suspending the entry into the U.S. of foreign nationals, other than the immediate family of U.S. citizens and permanent residents, who have traveled in China within the last 14 days.
  • State and local health departments, when contacted by a DoD Public Health Authority and upon concurring with a case’s designation as a PUI, will, in coordination with the DoD Public Health Authority, immediately notify CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) to report the PUI and determine whether testing for COVID-19 is indicated. For PUIs within the U.S., DoD public health authorities should contact the relevant state and local health departments, who, upon concurring with a case’s designation as a PUI, will notify CDC’s EOC at 770-488-7100 to report the PUI and determine whether testing for COVID-19 is indicated. The EOC will assist with the collection, storage, and shipment of specimens to CDC, including after hours or on weekends/holidays. On 2 FEB, CDC issued updated interim guidance for Collecting, Handling, and Testing Clinical Specimens and Criteria to Guide Evaluation of PUIs for COVID-19.

Update - 26 FEB 2020

 

Update - 25 FEB 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • On 24 FEB, CDC issued Travel Health Notices: Level 3-Avoid Non-Essential Travel for China; Level 2-Practice Enhanced Precautions for South Korea and Japan; Level 1-Practice Usual Precautions for Hong Kong, Italy, and Iran.
  • As of 24 FEB, 79,553 COVID-19 cases have been reported from 37 (+ Afghanistan, Bahrain, Iraq, Kuwait, Oman) countries/regions with 2,628 deaths (case fatality rate=3.3%).
  • As of 24 FEB, CDC reports 53 confirmed U.S. cases; 14 detected through local surveillance and 39 detected among repatriated AMCITS from Wuhan & Diamond Princess cruise ship.
  • CDC believes the risk to communities quarantining repatriated U.S. citizens is low.
  • 12 of 14 DoD clinical laboratories approved to provide diagnostic testing services received their test kits and conducted panel verification studies. Nine laboratories encountered reagent problems and are awaiting CDC replacement reagents within the next few weeks.
  • NHRC, William Beaumont AMC, and Womack AMC are approved for clinical testing.
  • CDC believes the risk to communities quarantining repatriated U.S. citizens is low.

 

Update - 21 FEB 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • As of 21 FEB, Iran confirmed 18 COVID-19 cases (4 deaths) in individuals who are either residents of Qom or traveled recently to Qom. Qom is the seventh largest city in Iran, and a major pilgrimage destination for Shi'a Muslims from around the world.
  • Globally, 76,787 COVID-19 cases have been reported from 32 (+ Iran, Israel, Lebanon) countries/regions with 2,248 deaths (case fatality rate=2.9%); 75,467 of these cases have occurred in mainland China. 
  • COVID-19 infections continue to affect INDOPACOM (19 countries/regions including mainland China), NORTHCOM (2), EUCOM (10), and CENTCOM (4).
  • As of 21 FEB, 16 confirmed cases are reported in 7 U.S. states, with a new case in Humboldt County, CA; in addition, at least 11 of 13 presumptive positive COVID-19 cases repatriated from Japan were confirmed positive at University Nebraska Med Center.
  • CDC believes the risk to communities quarantining repatriated U.S. citizens is low.
  • As of 21 FEB, NHRC and William Beaumont AMC are approved for clinical testing.

 

Update - 19 FEB 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • 950 passengers are quarantined by HHS on five DoD facilities (Travis AFB, March ARB, MCAS-Miramar (2 cases), Camp Ashland NE (14 cases), JBSA-Lackland (1 case)).
  • All repatriated COVID-19 cases are isolated in local hospitals.
  • CDC believes the risk to communities quarantining repatriated U.S. citizens is low.
  • As of 18 FEB, 15 confirmed cases are reported in seven U.S. states with 14 repatriated cases from the Diamond Princess cruise-ship increasing total case count in the U.S. to 29.
  • CDC projects additional cases of COVID-19 are likely to be detected in the U.S.
  • 12 of 14 DoD clinical labs have received testing kits; CDC reported problems in manufacture of one of the control reagents used in the test verification process.
  • Only NHRC lab passed initial panel verification; remaining 13 DoD clinical labs expect new kits as well as replacement reagents from CDC early this week.
  • Confirmatory testing for COVID-19 continues to be performed at the CDC.
  • As of 17 FEB, CDC has identified 467 PUIs in 42 states and territories (392 ruled out).
  • COVID-19 infections continue to affect INDOPACOM (16 countries/regions including mainland China), NORTHCOM (2), EUCOM (9), and CENTCOM (2).
  • 74,335 lab confirmed and clinically diagnosed cases have been reported from 29 countries/regions with 1,873 deaths (case fatality rate=2.5%).
  • 40,417 air travelers have been screened in the U.S.; two individuals currently quarantined.
  • Diamond Princess cruise-ship: 335 U.S. citizens repatriated to Travis (177) and Lackland (158) Air Force Bases; 61 U.S. citizens remain quarantined on the ship; shipboard COVID-19 case count increased by 70 over the past 24 hours to 542.
  • According to the CDC, current COVID-19 global public health threat is high but current immediate risk to most Americans is low.

 

Update - 14 FEB 2020

For Continued Situational Awareness Only.

  • PUI criteria has been amended to include any person, including health care workers, who has had close contact with a lab-confirmed COVID-19 patient < 14 days of symptom onset.
  • “COVID-19” page added to DRSi, simplifying reporting of PUIs and confirmed cases. 
  • 608 passengers are in quarantine by HHS on 6 separate DOD facilities (Travis AFB, March ARB, MCAS-Miramar, Camp Ashland NE, JBSA-Lackland, JBPH-Hickam).
  • 12 of 13 DoD clinical labs have received testing kits; only NHRC approved for testing.
  • As of 13 FEB, 15 confirmed cases have been reported in seven U.S. states (14th case in MCAS-Miramar, 15th case in JBSA-Lackland (both on isolation at local hospitals)
  • As of 13 FEB, there are 428 PUIs in 41 states and territories.
  • The spread of COVID-19 infections continues to affect countries in INDOPACOM (16 countries/regions including mainland China), NORTHCOM (2), EUCOM (9), and CENTCOM (1). Confirmed cases continued to increase to 59,822 confirmed cases worldwide; 1,367 deaths for a case fatality rate=2.3%).
  • As of 13 FEB, CDC has identified 428 PUIs in 41 states and territories.

 

Update - 12 FEB 2020

  • WHO has announced that the official name for 2019-nCoV will be COVID-19.
  • 800 passengers are in quarantine by HHS on 5 separate DOD facilities (Travis AFB, March ARB, MCAS-Miramar, Camp Ashland NE, JBSA-Lackland).
  • As of 11 FEB, AFHSB-GEIS confirms testing reagents for COVID-19 surveillance have been shipped to 8 DoD OCONUS labs (Cambodia, Thailand, Jordan, Egypt, Peru, Kenya, Tanzania and Georgia) as well as to 3 DoD CONUS labs (USAFSAM, NHRC & USAMRIID) and will arrive by the end of the week.
  • CDC has confirmed that an American evacuee from Wuhan has been found COVID-19-positive at MCAS-Miramar; patient is under isolation at UCSD Med Center and has become the 7th case in CA and the 13th case in the U.S.
  • The spread of COVID-19 infections continues to affect countries in INDOPACOM (16 countries/regions including mainland China), NORTHCOM (2), EUCOM (9), and CENTCOM (1). Confirmed cases continued to increase to 43,138 confirmed cases worldwide (1,016 deaths in China, one in the Philippines, one in Hong Kong; case fatality rate=2.4%); 42,670 cases are in mainland China and 471 cases have occurred elsewhere.
  • As of 11 FEB, CDC has identified 416 PUIs in 37 states.
  • Human-to-human (HTH) transmission continues to occur among close & community contacts in China; limited HTH transmission has been reported in multiple countries.
  • Per CDC, COVID-19 is NOT spreading in the community in the U.S. at this time.
  • The global death toll from the novel coronavirus has surpassed that of 2002-03 SARS outbreak (774 people in 26 countries); mortality rate much lower at ~2% (SARS~10%).
  • Significant risk for health care workers (HCWs) documented at Wuhan treatment center (Zhongnan hospital); 57 (41%) of 138 cases occurred among HCWs (NEJM, 7 FEB).
  • Cruise Ship (Off shore Japan): 3,711 passengers continue on quarantine; COVID-19 case count has increased to 130 including 33 U.S. citizens.
  • WHO is investigating serologic tests for detection of milder/asymptomatic cases.

 

Update - 11 FEB 2020

We have recieved updated guidance from the Monterey County Health Department  (MCHD) for schoolsThere are no major changes to report.  The risk to the general community remains low.  CAL MED will continue to monitor the situation and provide key updates as we receive them.  Below is a FAQ from the MCHD for Parents:

 

  1. What is 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)? 2019-nCoV is a respiratory illness caused by a virus in the coronavirus family. It is called a “novel” coronavirus because it is a new type of coronavirus not seen before. It was first identified in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. Because this is a new virus, experts are still learning about the virus.
  2. How does 2019-nCoV spread? 2019-nCoV spreads from person-to-person when someone coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza virus is spread. Also, if a person’s hands are contaminated with respiratory secretions containing virus, they can transfer the virus to things they touch like door handles and pens. Another person can touch the contaminated items then touch their eyes or mouth and become infected.
  3. What are the symptoms of 2019-nCoV? It takes 2 to14 days after being infected for most people to show symptoms. Individuals with 2019-nCov have a fever, usually above 100.4° F, with cough, chest pain, or shortness of breath. Other symptoms can include headache, sore throat, fatigue, and nasal congestion. 2019-nCoV can cause mild to severe respiratory illness.
  4. How is 2019-nCov treated? Unlike influenza, there is no vaccine or medication for 2019-nCoV. Instead, treatment focuses on relieving symptoms and keeping the person comfortable.
  5. Does 2019-nCoV pose a health risk to Monterey County? Right now, there have only been 6 cases diagnosed in California and none in Monterey County. There have also been 6 individuals diagnosed in other states who recently traveled to China or had close contact with someone who was sick with 2019-nCoV. The risk of getting 2019-nCoV is very low unless a person has close contact with a person sick with 2019-nCoV or recently traveled to an area with a 2019-nCoV outbreak.
  6. How can I keep from getting 2019-nCoV? The same healthy habits we practice during influenza season can help prevent the spread of 2019-nCoV:
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. 
    • Avoid touching your eyes or mouth with your hands.
    • Clean or sanitize commonly touched surfaces like doorknobs, light switches, and telephones.
    • Avoid people who appear ill. Stay back at least 6 feet from someone who appears sick.
    • When possible, avoid traveling to an area where there is an outbreak of 2019-nCoV occurring.
    • If you do feel ill, cover coughs and sneezes with your elbow, not your hands, and stay home until you are better.
  7. How should I talk to children about 2019-nCoV? Sometimes children may feel a sense of anxiety or nervousness based on what is being reported in the news. The following tips may help you talk to children about their feelings:
    • Listen to your children. Reassure them that they are safe and try to focus on the facts.
    • Allow them to ask questions. Help your children understand how the illness is spread.
    • Make a game of showing children how to cough into their elbow or practicing good hand washing techniques.
    • Embrace teachable moments. This may be a good time to talk to your child about how misunderstanding and misinformation can create fear.
  8. What should schools do if they suspect there is someone ill with 2019-nCoV? Call the Monterey County Health Department at 831-755-4521. Public health workers will assist schools in assessing the individual’s risk of having 2019-nCoV by asking questions about travel history and symptoms. They will also provide guidance on any next steps that should be taken. If the individual is critically ill (for example, having trouble breathing), call 9-1-1 and provide as much information as possible.
  9. Will schools be alerted if a 2019-nCoV case is confirmed in Monterey County? Yes. The Monterey County Health Department will notify schools and the general public if an individual is confirmed to have 2019-nCoV in Monterey County. The Monterey County Health Department will also provide information about any risk to schools and the public at that time. The Health Department will guide schools and parents on any actions they may need to take.
  10. What is the Health Department doing about 2019-nCoV? Despite the low risk of a 2019-nCoV outbreak locally, we want to make sure you are aware of the facts and what proactive steps are being taken. The Monterey County Health Department is working closely with local hospitals, clinics, and other agencies to be prepared for a case of 2019-nCoV in Monterey County and to implement measures to stop the spread of the virus.

 

Update - 7 FEB 2020

  • No confirmed DoD cases; 5 DoD Patients Under Investigation (PUI) to-date (all ruled out).
  • AFHSB ensuring timely capture of all 2019-nCoV persons under investigation (PUI) by clarifying DoD 2019-nCoV reporting requirements: Key points; 1) Follow CDC PUI case definition; 2) Report PUIs as Reportable Medical Event in DRSi; 3) Report using established PH authority reporting procedures; 4) Direct reporting link to AFHSB.
  • Establishing MTF level 2019-nCoV Health Surveillance Explorer (HSE) MTF level map similar to current HSE influenza map.
  • 2019-nCoV ESSENCE query developed by the CDC now available in DoD ESSENCE.
  • Coordinating DoD 2019-nCoV laboratory data sharing to ensure timely MHS reporting.
  • The CDC 2019-nCoV Real-Time RT-PCR Diagnostic Panel is ready for distribution to qualified domestic public health laboratories for detection of 2019 novel coronavirus.
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) 4 FEB, 2020, to enable emergency use of the test kit in the U.S.
  • The spread of 2019-nCoV infections continues to affect countries in INDOPACOM (13), NORTHCOM (2), EUCOM (9), CENTCOM (1); Facilitated by international travel. Confirmed cases rapidly increased to 24,631 confirmed cases worldwide; 24,447 in China (493 deaths in China, one death in the Philippines; case fatality rate=2.0%) and at least 184 cases in other countries; including 12 in the United States.
  • As of 5 FEB, CDC is investigating 293 PUIs in the U.S. (36 states); 12 have been found positive; 206 have been negative, and 76 are pending lab results.

Update - 4 FEB 2020

  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that although the situation poses a very serious public health threat, the immediate risk to the U.S. public continues to be low.
  • There have been six confirmed cases of the 2019-nCoV in California, none are from Monterey County.
  • Those at highest risk for acquiring 2019-nCoV are those who have recently traveled to China in the past 14 days or a close contact to someone positive for 2019-nCoV in the past 14 days.
  • The Department of Defense has established a Spotlight page to disseminate the latest information on the outbreak and to highlight coordination efforts with other organizations throughout the U.S. government: https://health.mil/News/In-the-Spotlight/Coronavirus 
  • Please see the "CDC 2019-nCoV Daily Key Points" for updated Travel Advisories/information.

 

 

CORVID19 Resources

 

 

2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) 
 

This is an emerging, rapidly evolving situation and CDC will provide updated information as it becomes available, in addition to updated guidance.

Resources from the CDC:

 

For the latest updates on virus, it is recommended that you visit the CDC webpage here.

 

 

Information for Travelers
 

Information about 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) for travelers from China can be found on this CDC Travel webpage.

 

Resources:

 

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